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FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
ENCLOSURE COVER SHEET 

subject djTTLe $VTJL/!T/S)A) 



CROSS-REFERENCES 

3£L PAGES REVIEWED FOR THIS RELEASE 
PAGES AVAILABLE FOR RELEASE 



THIS IS ENCLOSURE 



OF ENCLOSURES 



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September 10, U74 



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Honorable Carl T. Curtis 
United States Senate 
Washington, D. C. 30510 



Dear Senator 



V.'.- -»- /r 



This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 
September 4th, with enclosure, concerning the recent 
ing and killing of cattle in several nebraska 



On August 23rd Z answered year letter of August 31st 
and indicated Z was baring s representative of our Qaaha . 
m •» c Cf ice contact Mr. George Hitchcock of Stuart, VebraSka* 



J 



4 a t ermine whether the facts constituted s possible violation 
• gtff law within the investigative jurisdiction of the 

S e ~ • Zjisve lost received a men mica tics frou < 



■-.•'.V-'¥t>*'-A** *• ■ ' 

"rp ^ • Z^urve just received s men mica tics from Our 
*, uj $< aahhk)ff ice which sets forth the results of interviews 
i v> +i 1th Hr.rBftchcock and Charles Pom, Sheriff of Bolt flemm*m»- >ae£ 

IN 



Jebraska encased on the information furnished by tJ 
. individual It appears that mo Federal law within 



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stigatiare Jurisdiction of the FmZ has 
-bs there isbeo indication of inters 
Ipaimeb^or k&led animals. Z am imf 

►currently under investigation by the Kebraska State Petrol*;- 
end law enforcement officers in the counties involved. 



wiolstmd, 

ansportatlom of the 
that this matter is. 





f€3<4410) 



Sincerely 

C M. Katrj 
Clarence n« Kelley 

-♦if / ;» 





^ona^felervices Of ficer 




— mOTBt Bureau has had prior cordial correspondence with Senator 
pi»ii'«i_ Curtis (R-Heb.)>0m constituent setters*' ./•^♦-ir 

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CARLAi CURTIS 



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mtxiUeb £>lctU& Jbenale \ 

WASHINGTON, DjC SMtO 

September 4, 1974 




Dir. , - 
Dfp.-A.D.-Adra. 

Dcp.-A.D.-Inv. 

Attt Dir.: 
Admin. 




Mr. Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice y\ 
Washington, D. C» (^J 

Dear Mr. Kelley: 

This will refer to my previous letter of August 21 to 
you regarding the series of incidents stretching from Oklahoma y 
to Nebraska in which cattle have been dismembered in some kind / 
of strange witchcraft cult. 

Enclosed is a newspaper article which appeared in the ** 
Hastings, Nebraska, Daily Tribune concerning these weird events. 
Articles similar to this one have appeared in many of the Nebraska 
newspapers. I thought you would want to see this article in 
order to substantiate the claims which have been made. 

I am wondering if your good offices have instigated an 
investigation into this situation either in Nebraska or any of 
the other states experiencing similar acts of mutilation to 
livestock. I will appreciate hearing from you. 



:Uon 

Intel!. 

Laboratory 

Plan, * KvaL . 

Spec Inv. 

Training 

Le?*l Coon. 

Telephone Rm, . 
Director Sec'y _ 



Thanking you, I am 




icerely yours 



f CARL^T. CURTIS, USS 




End. 
CTC:fjp 



65-0 



si 




H^SS^-e- 1974 



CORRESPOND 




Are VFO 



Th«jr*day,Au9ua» ». WM Dally Tribone, HmHw, 



? itfhtingt itrxd mutilationi related? \ V^t ^1^^ - 

utilated li vestocl^ elicVt)^ ai 

^^^^^^^^ mmm ^ m ^^ m _ . « ^^^™"*"^^^^^"**^^^f^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ , ^BBtwawaWawaenn^nWWnwawWW^"^— ^n^ _ ^ * tf k 



hfstOated Nveeteck, WMSthorlaad -*>ar mOes west af 
helkopteraanewildMttftedflyW objects flee head of cwttkhavt beat 
have resides ts vooderinf tad wuijluf It 

arut of NctrMkj. ' taw 



m aroof flat there* 

. *e Huts he had ***** 

taw^^francata 



J) 

atdefte 



•today three mdea eootfaeatt af Maria* Bat Robert Marls af 

— the Warms Papetda Cam. . . ttrestfeater for the criminal 
FIFTH KILLED 

Ibis vat the fifth 
aaatilated la HadUoe 
•syfterioof drtwiftOTco. Vtav tasd of 

cattle have been focal with Mr sac fthflcatfaaa thai 

tftifii cot fSHll. fa Mn4rfi£iflB OP dj tLibtf kftd t^djgn^ 

mc tye, iv atr, to mt, Booth Md tenon wfco It 

hm chopfw) afl. . faaad tracks h attt caaaa-V* « 

fetifflafteafebeaerapairialewjr " ^(Mtf^.eWthnwwM 4 

Che state. Similar eases hare haea Is or Ttnri ai rtianj HlTa-in as hHiliat 
reported ha Texas, law* etd atber . Camtj, SbMifT Larrr Yfijm&otfcni aajs 

IGdwetten states. Each caaabnohaa the he frankly doeaat kaowrtat to aUafttw 

reomral af the animal i an erfta*. kmiap At first he hlamed Ilea predated. 



'IfeortandkxUdaadfavarelaawsd*' V? the kfltafa. Itadiaca Conatj cattle here heat atria* 4 lew <a7a.H1 

1 raral Oakltad, accardiai t* aaa htarrtn Adam tin that the eaet he hat rfflttaaartMw? awjfldt«*wtcay! 

widest. tweatipled hare heaa doa* hy liatli, taed tew*, aajfthtt w^thMpat la I 

A ejoarterborte was fowad metflatad frebthfr a eaH of tome kaad. ' - ,'wjrwiiwi» 

wtheatt at Nsriaft BatRobert Marls af WitaflaW, at thewWwMMflnV' 

la (arm. tovatthntor lor the crtmtaal ftrfciea af "wfcdhwa;eean6et ate 

tteSUte Patrol, tela. There art a lot af lsnntttea aai jawB 

aatmal kffled and traiat af thoafbt. there hate haea ta taW WhaV^ 



their 
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UFQs sou rce of wonlerli^ 

feme art F^Cbamtf^ dtrpBci; 'Witch. Harold Crete- *M ato :i attf«t Mf 

■ttTonaadUmuhlpolIldblttatftf T«**d M If H ted a ftttk aWaVfraaa * 

the towns ts tfae camtj. ■ ,• w v. fchl oa each ride with a gtow — l oaadtof 

OTHER HAPPENINGS .* • v. (L K wa§ bcttad a tnc aatf fnmd from • 

Cattle kffliaci aren't toe aefr ttraafft eee afcfc ef toe tree to toe attar. 

tagpenlap to aartbatat Katoaata. Tfcata oookinHtenbowckmkwMcraowbetJt 

here been awneroes reports ef tat- waa aaaajaf ." _>\ . ,>Vi'j»M 

Ueetified flyiflf objects ti both Aatalgpa ANOTHER LIGHT . > * & < 
ItdKancMBta. • 
fittrifl Herbert ltosnpesa af 





FBI # 

Date: 1/&/15 



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Transmit th* following In 
Vt» ATBTEL 



(Tjpt i* plaintext or *0*f«# 



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(Priority) 



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TO: 

FROM: 

SUBJECT! 



DIRECTOR, FBI ATTENTION t FBI LABORATORY 

SACt MINNEAPOLIS (&&0>)(t&-0 

AWTILATIONS OF ANIMALS S 
1 MINNESOT A. NORTH & SOUTH DAKOT A t/<S \ 

RESEARCH MATTER — ■=» 




For the information of the Bureau, animal* 
mostly livestock, have been reported as mutilated in 
the three-state area of this division and parts of their 
bodies missing* The parts listed as missing have been 
the sexual organs, ears, lips and udders, and in some 
instances, the blood from the animals was considered 
"completely drained." No evidence of value ever located 
at the scene* 

State veterinarians, after examination of 
mutilated animal carcasses', contend dead animals were 
eaten by other animals or varmits, believed to be foxes 
due to their sharp side teeth, which were described as 
"shearing teeth like scissors." 

The Bureau is requested to furnish the 
Minneapolis Division with any supporting information to 
the above connects made by st*\e veterinarians or, if 
already contacted by other .jaw* enforcement agencies, the 
results of their investigations or your laboratory results 
of evidence previously submitted in similar cases* OSftfO 1 

ments made 



Enclosed is a xerox clipp 
by RICHARD HILDE (NA), Chief Agent, 
Bureau, Bismarck* *t***t *" ifiA. 

X * Minneapolis 
BAEira* 

(4) 



ȣC-23 
ing 



North 



ffcO^UM 



Dakota Crime 



A^tovodt 



Special Ago* la C 





Stat 



Pot 



^V^To: SAC, Minnea|olia (62-0-U7A3) 

"from: Director. FBI 4 3 ~& ~~ ^6^^ ' 

hutilXttoks or animals 

MINNESOTA, NORTH 6 SOUTH DAKOTA 
RESEARCH MATTER 



Reference Minneapolis airtel dated January 21, 1975* 

Tha circumstances tat forth in raf tranced airtel 
vara discussed vitb Dr. Don Wilson, Chief, Mammalogy Section, 
U. 3. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Wilson said that the circumstances set forth in 
. referenced airtel are consistent "with natural phenomena. 
According to Dr. Wilson, vhen small manuals such as foxes and 
opposums feed on the carcasses of large mammals such as 
cattle that have not decayed they first feed on soft tissues 
such as the nose, lips, udders and genital arees. Be said 
that it has been frequently observed that the genital area 
its most often the first soft tissue to be attacked. 

Dr. Wilson had no information concerning the specific 
appearance of tissue bitten by foxes. 



*sc:&(5) 



_ MAILED 21 ^ 

JAN 271975 




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WSWaKCK t API - An 
explanation ai/ have beta 
Ion :« a rash of Umcock 
oeliiira thai fcavt pbgued 

SUV Zftlttl *rJ h*Yt fKtfl^y 
ftMttd ss North Dudu. 
srft ae> tf£bat of (he Zvortb 
buU Cricie Bureatt 

Cub k2*A Richard Wide 
said Lj office had been getting 
acadared mvj recently of 
Sw;<k mutilation across 
Sixth *b*a were sin- 

Qar to a rail a culiblion re 
■ from South Dakota ttfli*r 

'Ai i=a puUt -veto the Crist 
l * ed *jjt amruli died of 



says esauf BBsffScraas 



asturaJ causrs and that animals 
hive eaten tbe parti af the 
Evestock after they art deoV 
HrtJessld. 

StcenUf, the bureaa has re- 
ceived reports of livestock mu- 
tilations in several North Dakota 
counties, be said, Two cows and 
a bull we reported at killed is 
KcKenry County, four cattle 
were found (ted with parts of 
their bodies missing in Dickey 
County asd a cow was found ta a 
simitar coadirion fa Foster 
County, be said. la addition 
theft via m bars* reported Dual 

UtrA'nf ta Hclatosh Gmaiy, 
- — j m 



which was alio r eported as being 
mutilated, be added. 

~W« had been getting these 
ttpcfU aad they bid aalfcd it 
mutilation," he said. Tanam 
could ©ever find (aoipnni* and 
they could never Gad vehicle 
trarta." 

la moot casei there was aha 
no blond reportedly found, be 
said. However carU of the dead 
attimais, iacluding aciual 
organs. «rs. Gps and udders 
were found missing oa tike ani- 
mals leading the assumption tbo 
mutilaUons might have beta tha 
wort of humans, be sail. 

"J'm complexly satisfied at 



I svsot R23y' fcav© fcoam Souflfad 



ity. rerfgmed an au- 
1 !m ( Hiidt ukL 
Tie 4»c*.sr*ft feci^fi showed 
^e wsrje lad data of dysentery, 
ElotxcitfA 

Be ecihaiiieS that fanes and 
ccher Kill viuls may hava 
bam myoewUe for the mulila- 
owm»35t bad an killed the ami* 
tail*. He Acted Eat such malt 
at abk to kill 
£:* size of a bane or 
faA ba wotiS aat pans of the 
aaaa! adk a£v to ware 

. SO aba acted that oa w*l- 
U nr^cal incisions wai 
e± tfct bant, although II 



had parts <d Iht body mittinf. 

-What we had been toU aonul 
tfct muulatione wis that the cut 
was so dean it (coked like a 
tefitil cut" be said* However, 
ha added that tha bureau news 
-betiinras the cuts war* made by 
the side tttlb of aatmalSt 
prabaMy feses/* 

He said the dead ammab la 
North DakoU Had beta found ta 
scatttrtd tocations, aad the 
Bureau brlievwi they died of 
aanril causes and tim amsD 
aaimals ajcb as foaea had tatea 
tbc soft pam ol the aaiauJs. 

GPde said veteriaahafts had 
^'■ir^ thai faus haft sharp 



si^V teeth, which ha described as 
^he*h*m teeth tike w^V 
Became the fade of hows and 
cattie b UHigh p tha smalt 
animals, such as foseak wwld 
cat the aoftcr parte of the 
animal* audi as the lipa and 
adders, he said. 

-He fihe «rima!> k «!^ 
with the aide of Us nouth with 
shearing teeth that mailt it look 
tike a surgical cut,** Hilda said, 

The Crime Bureau afctit a!sa 
aotedthattmaH animals— Hut 
iues-*aidd kave oa tracks ta 
rough areas and pastures. Siaco ' 
they would act ttavatrtcfc* that 
would provide Ik* applanation aa 



ta why oa hynaa root prims or 
vetweie trades found at tha 
scent af the livastacfc 
muttiaiions, he added 

IradcHtwrx if the animals had 
been dead for Sftveratdavs there 
would bt little if any blood, 
since ft would ha*? caagulotad. 
ha sild. 

Klde said bt contacted the 
South Dakota Crime Bureau 
Tuesday "aid Owy Ye satisfied 
the deaths were rataraL" He 
ate noted that a iaterin South 
oakou had provided aa ax* 
planatian similar ta tha 00a 
Msg died by theNortit Dakota' 
CrincSvaau, 



this point that we da net have a 
maniac or cult aa the knte." 
Hilda aald. 

lie noted that taw enfercemeot 
officials in both states had beat 
^tndered in their iovrsiifiyons 
because the bodies of the dead 
Evcsuxk were usually found 
days after they had died *% 
wfaua stages af btirtg da* 
composed.* 4 The horse found 
dead ia Mcintosh County waa 
relatively "fresh" id a t 
thorough autopsy could bt per* 
formed, be saul 

Dr. Ivan &rg. a veteriaaHaa 
with the Vnefiaaiy 5 o>k t Do- * 
partment at North DakcuStatt j 




I * v>- ; : me a 8 ood a son' not only to meet them personally but. to discuss^ 
siTV natters of mutual, interest. 




press 

that the FBI enter the 



: . interest in Senator HASKELL* s request tha 
k./'V livestock mutilation case.' '-' :» - 



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* ' UNlTM) STAI^SjCV;VKRN\(tNT *»«,d* _ 

Memorandum ' 

A**ta, — 

Cp-^ trti 

* *^ 1 _1 ... - - * i . 4 A 4AM? f Mi AH#tt# 

Tt> : Mr, Auams iiati;: DcptemDer ivia nt#**/i^ 

# jit ./ 1- Mr. Adams g£2± 

' from :R. J. G&ttgtfr ' J - Mr- Si 1 ^ K 

A \ ■ 1 - Mr. O'ConneU £L,"^Z 

. w iMi»ce)t.-.!tco U i . Npn Sutivcj«jve 1 - Mr. COOtfee ^ n-.*t»u_ 

-^I'BjEaifKlUTILATION OF LIVESTOCK . 1 - Mr. Sheer 

STATE OF COLORADO 1 - Mr. Bower* . 

INFORMATION CONCERNING 4 | ^\^pSt* 

In response to a telephone call from Honorable Floyd K. /*' ■ 
/Haskell, United States Senator from Colorado, to the Director 9/11/75, 
rcohtacted Senator Haskell teiephonicaiiy today, S/12/7 5. 

Senator Haskell Indicated his concern for a situation occurring 
in the western states where cattle have been discovered mutilated. The 
bizarre mutilations involve loss of left ear, left eye, sex organ, and the 
blood drained from the carcass with no traces of blood left on the ground 
and no footprints. 

Senator Haskell repeated his request that the FBI enter the 
investigation. The provisions of the Interstate Transportation of Stolen 
Cattle Statute, Title 18, U. S. Code, Section 2311, were explained to <■ 
him. It was pointed out that there must be an interstate transportation, 
Senator Haskell said that he had no information that an Interstate transporta- 
tion had occurred in any of these cases. He said he felt this was too big 
for the local authorities, and the FBI with its resources could come to a 
solution. He said the ranchers are getting considerably worried out there 
and he felt if the FBI would just enter the investigation it would have a 
deterrent effect. Our jurisdiction was explained to Senator Haskell and 
he said that be understood our statutory limitations and inquired as to 
whether a resolution would give us the necessary investigative jurisdiction.^ 

Senator Haskell was'aiv'fied tha?Si?robably would taki^Sawf ^ 
whereupon he asked if there were anyone that he could discuss this matter 
with. He was referred to the Criminal Division of the Department of 
justice. — _ ^ - jut- 

Senator Haskell thanked me for calli« h^jpd. jgated he Cjjjb^ 



understood but he wished there was something we could^ot^ 
BJG:lge , 07 r , CONTINUED - OVER 

f «ciosiM,r 



( ) 
Memorandum to Mr. Adams 
RE: MUTILATION OF LIVESTOCK 
STATE OF COLORADO 



Senator Haskell recontacted me this afternoon and said that . 
he had received a call from DanpEdwards, editor of the paper in 
Brush, Colorado, who furnished information that U. S. Army helicopters 
had been seen in the vicinity of where some of the cattle were mutilated 
and that he, Edwards, had been threatened but Senator Haskell did not 
know what sort of threats Edwards had received or by whom. 

He was advised that this information would be furnished to 
our Denver Office and that Denver would closely follow the situation. 
Senator Haskell expressed his appreciation. 

Inasmuch as Senator Haskell stated he might call the Criminal 
Division of the Department of Justice, John Keeney, Deputy Assistant 
Attorney General, Criminal Division, was telephonically advised of my 
contact with Senator Haskell and he was furnished background information 
concerning this situation. 

The above information was also furnished to SA Jim Bristol, 
Denver Office. Bristol was instructed to have Mr. Edwards contacted 
concerning the alleged threats that he has received. 



ACTION : 

For information. 



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September 12, 1575 




Honorable Floyd S. Caswell 
United State* Senate - - ■ 

Washington, D. C. 20510 

Dear Senator Haskell: 

Tour letter of August 29th to Special Agent in 
Charge Theodore Rosach has been forvardefi to ny office 

and X deeply appreciate the sincere concern expressed by you 
and your constituents* 

. • 

The information set forth In your letter regarding 
the mutilation of cattle in Colorado and several other Western 
states and the reported use of an unidentified helicopter by 
those individuals responsible has been carefully reviewed. r 
Z regret to lnfonc you that these actions do not constitute 
a violation f bf Federal lev cosing within the FEX'e Investiga- 
tive jurisdiction. 

X ait sprry that X cannot give you a sore favorable 
response an<£l hope the investigation currently being con* 
ducted by local J.av enforcement agencies regarding this . 
scatter vill Woon be successfully concluded* • 

Sincerely yours. 





Clarence M. Eel ley 
Director 

1 - Denver (1-62-0) ■* 

.Personal Attention SAC: Reurairtel B/29rtS afid r wAial "1/9/75. 
1 - Mr, Gallagher - Enclosures t2) "4** 
"> Attention Mr. Sheer »a 
1_— Mr. Berington - Enclosures/ (8^ 

1 - Office of Congressional Affairs - Enclosures" (2) V 

VOTE: Response coordinate^ with Legal Counsel end General . *HS' 
Investigative revisions. . ^OC^ - * * j*.^ 

«PH:eac (9kA» I^^T^/ U Xt.^^ 



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TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROMi — jyASAC, DENVER 



iicettancou* * Non-Subvcnln 



/ SUBJECT: yKirriLAIION.. QF_LIVESJJJCK 




] STATE OF COLORADO 
I N FORMATION" con cern in g 



Enclosed herewith is the original of 'a letter from 
U. S. Senator FLOYD K. HASKELL which was personally handed to 
ne this date relating to incidents involving mutilation of 
cattle and other livestock in Colorado. 

Senator HASKELL indicates that 130 such cases have 
been reported to local officials. He makes reference to the 
fact that such mutilation has occurred during the past two 
years in nine states. 

In his communication Senator HASKELL requests that 
the FBI enter the investigations being conducted in order to. 
provide unified direction to the overall matter of «uch 
mutilations. 



A 



I indi 
be furnished to F 
would receive a r 
out to the Sena 
any case, ve mus 1 
inarily by statut 
not aware of any 
in this natter. 



[ted to Senator HASKELL that his request would 
Headquarters, Washington, D-C. , and that he 
ly pertaining to his reouest. I also pointed 
that as he well knew, before the FBI can enter 
ve investigative jurisdiction provided pri- 

pointed out that £n this instance I vas 
tute which would provide for jurisdiction 




Bureau 

Denver 



(Enc. DC 
(1 - 62-0) 
CI - 80 -NEW) 



TFR: jb 




Approved: 



Special Aytit is Cbog* 



Scot 



Per 



• . " ■* * ■ -V-" * 

- . • ? • 

On this date I personally contacted United States ; 
Attorney JAKES L. TPXECE f District of Colorado, discussed ; ? - 

Senator's HASKELL* s letter vith his f and he concurred with- 
my comments to Senator HASKELL* ■ ■ -• ' - >V^V- 

In connection with furnishing me this letter,* : * * -V. 
Senator HASKELL, in advance, had released a statement to the S 
press indicating that he was asking the FBI to enter the 
investigation. Several inquiries have been received and I have 
indicated to the news media that the Senator's letter was 
being referred to FBI Headquarters in Washington and that his 
request would be resolved* * Upon being pressed I indicated that 
1, personally, knew of no legislation specifically covering the 
mutilation of livestock which would enable the FBI to enter 
such an investigation* • < 

The above is being furnished to the Bureau for "■ V * ■ 
information and for an official reply to Senator HASKELL* s * 
request* Senator HASKELL indicated that he is returning to 
Washington, D.C* in connection with the reconvening of the . *jj 
Senate session. 



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I * 'SCnMeb .Slake Senate 



7Z~j \ ■ Theodore P. Rosack 

: Special Agent In Charge 

■* I Denver Federal Building 

! •! .. 1961 Stout Street 

Denver, Colorado 80202 



Washington, txc mm 

August 29, 1975 



Dear Nr. Rosack: 

For several months my office has been receiving reports of cattle 
mutilations throughout Colorado and other western states. At least 130 
cases in Colorado alone have been reported to local officials and the 
Colorado Bureau of Investigation (C6I); the Cfil has verified that the 
incidents have occured for the last two years In nine states. 



^ | The ranchers and rural residents of Colorado are concerned and 

frightened by these incidents. The bizarre mutilations are frightening 
in themselves: 1n virtually all the cases, the left ear, left eye. rectum 
and sex organ of each animal has been cut away and the blood drained from 
the carcass, but with no traces of blood left on the ground and no foot* 
RLl prints. 

fcShf In Colorado's Morgan County area, there has also been reports that 

I a helicopter was used by those who mutilated the carcasses of the cattle, 

| and several persons have reported being chased by a similar helicopter. 



Because I am gravely concerned by this situation, I am asking that 
J • the Federal Bureau of Investigation enter the case. Although the CBI 

t has been investigating the incidents, and local officials also have been 

' Involved, the lack of a central unified direction has frustrated the In* 
M « vestlgation. It seems to have progressed little, except for the 

recognition at long last that the Incidents must be taken seriously. 



;3 i Now it appears that ranchers are arming themselves to protect their 

j?» -c livestock, as well as their families and themselves, because they are 

•3'* frustrated by the unsuccessful investigation. Clearly something must be 

- done before someone gets hurt. 



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The fact that allegations have been made of the loss of livestock 
In 21 states under similar circumstances strongly suggests the very 
real possibility that the crossing of state lines Is Involved and, this 
alone, I feel, should justify the participation of the FBI In this case. 

I urge you to begin your investigation as soon as possible, and to 
contact my office to discuss In more detail the incidents I have described. 
We stand ready to give you all possible assistance. 




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#ui* ten tomoei 



|!|!f>^'MjvWNfTED STATES*. VERNMENT 

Memorandum 



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DIRECTOR i FBI date! 10/14/76 'WM't 



AC, SPRINGFIELD (62^2559) (F) 



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ami' flhSUUUXjeS M#-8u£>*i£$t\/i 

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Springfield alrtel to Bureau dated 10/1/76, 

SnMpsed for the Bureau la one copy of an article *. ' - . 
entitled "Jhe^utllttlon Mystery**, which allegedly appeared ;-" 
In Oul Magazine^ September, 1976 Issue. 



For the Information of the Bureau, Sheriff RUSSELL 
CREWS, Marshall County, Illinois Sheriff's Department, La con, ? 
Illinois, on 9/30/76, furnished enclosed article to SA DONALD R. 
80RENSEK since it pertained to widespread incidents such an 
those set forth In referenced alrtel. This is furnished to 
the Bureau in view of numerous references In this article to 
Federal investigative agencies and also theories that these 
mutilations of cattle are only a forerunner for later mutilations 
of human beings. 



f v) 



.4- ^ 




U3 




\\% Bureau. (End 1) 

1 - Springfield (62-2559) ' jfiF* 4 OCT fiO WS 

ti : T - ir ,WtS/dc t . 





if •• ■-. 



•-T^XtTfltvm 





OURiNCS THE PAST THREE YEARS. • ' „ - 
■ WORE THAN 1500 CATTLE IN [22 ^STATES HAVE BEEN 
• KILLED AND MUTtLATED.THEtR BLOOD DRAINED , 
" ANDSELECTED -ORGANS REMOVED 
. " WITHSURGtCALPREClSfON. 
SUSPECTS RANGE FROM SATANIC CULTtSTS - * 
TO GOVERNMENT RESEARCHERS. 



AN EXCLUSIVE REPORT BY ED SANDERS . 



YT 1 * ** M ° r 1973 * ***** wm ftbgut 

40 frightening cattle mutilations in 
4 dozen counties io north-central 
Ksnsss. most of ibem occurring 
J ZLalong U.S. tl, which runs north 
through Ktitiis info Nebraska. Nebraska 
abo had tomt mutilated moot. 

Kaqus sheriff departments, the high- 
way patrol tod the state bureau of in* 
vtstigattan teemed baffled, as did the 
-vkliroited caute rancher*. The ranchers 
w*re used lo the nocturnal depredations 
of predators, but they hid never seen 
anything like the surg ical precision ud 
methodic*! discrimination with which 
these animals had been chopped vp: 
some with their ear* and tongue and, 
lay. an aye removed; other* with a 
fwiih of tail, their udden and a patch of 
Mck fteih cut cfcant/ away; and Dearly 
all of them with the nmn and genitals 
neatly excised* " " * * " ' 

The removal of cow vulm and bull 
dongs cawed (peculation thxt weirdos 
wen Involved. $*ttpiclon fall upon one 
or more of tte following; (1) the in* 
tpocuibU altnanigans of thou great 
scapegoats, the hippies; (2) «* deviates 
practicing bu1Mong/cow*vulva «rocU 
Iks; of O) the rim of some religious 
cuIiUu of a devn-wonhiping nature. 

Many authorities demurred. Or. Har- 
ry Anthony, director of the Ksnsas Suie 
Unmrsliy veterinarian laboratory, stated 
fa laic lf?3 that four out of *e nine 
mutilated animals that the bb bad ex- 
amined apparently had died of s cattle 
dilute calfed blackleg; the Kansas fUte 
brands commissioner declared that 99 
pertem of the deaths of animals that had 



been mutilated had been caused by natu- 
ral factors. Such statements triggered a 
bit of outrage in law-cnforocmcnt circles 
hi the 12 Kansas counties effected, with 
muty officials flAUiEaintng iheir belief 
that humans were involved. 

There were ecvcral bit* of «*Mjnce 
thai poinied away from predators. There 
was the absence of blood and footprints, 
for example. One cow was even found in 
a Urge mirihck, but still there were no 
tracks* Then, there w*i a peculiar ab* 
state of dangling guts and scattered 
hunks of Ae>h (predators do not read 
Emily Pott). Alio, though many animals 
were found m secluded areas, others wtrt 
found near barns or a few fact from 
deeping fanner** window*— doser to civ- 
fljzation than predators usually roam, # 
• And then there were the helicopter*. 
Helicopters without filed flight plans wet* 
sighted quite often in the afflicted coun- 
ties, eomctimea hovering above cattle 
pens, But authorities wen not able to 
catch Che choppers or to locate their 
landing and refueling anas. One of the 
early theories was that a helicopter-borne 
ntftling operation was going on, but when 
ft was discovered thai all that was being 
lustkd ware eyebatfs, genitals, milk sacs 
and sphinoerf, , that theory eotLapied 
Then there was a rumor, apparently with* 
out foundation, that the helicopters were 
pan of a seem military exercise out of 
FoilRiky.Kaius. 

The situation invited off-the-wall spec- 
trfsiion. specially as more and more 
strange facts became known such as, 
when removing the cyca from cattle, the 
amfiaurs would take not only the eye* 



bait but also the eyefid7 rwmbr* /w and 
*% There was to be more* Much more.* 

tfw: YtM or Tti*j*xnt$ 
In April 1974, (he mutilators wen at 
it again In Nebraska, with the same 
familiar media tptmdli Blood was 
drained In some Instances; there were no 
footprint*; and various organs were tv- 
niovW. apparently surgkulty* High <*S- 
ctals Again leaned inward m predatory 
coyotc/crow/cacoon-with^-scalpd -th> 
ory. The toO of mutes, as wiutilttica 
buffs began referring to the acta, mounted 
throughout the wmmcr, and by Septem- 
ber, some SO cam had been reported to 
the Cor nhuskcr State* n 

As h Kansas, the rumor that the mu- 
tiUtiont were the am of bcUcopter* 
equipped dievfl wonhipert. 9f *fc«itU> 
ritualists,* began to spread among the 
food farmers of Nebraska* Shagun- 
toting vigpaata took to riding the back 
roads from dawn to dusk. JLtnche-v 
sometimes stopped out-of-suta vehicles < 
for a cow-Mood check. Same inarksper< - 
eon Io a pickup apparent!/ tried to wbj 
an aircraft that was checking a po^ci 
(oe near Grand Island, Nebraska; aa a 
mull. Ibe state National Guard ordered 
iu choppers to fly at a mJelmum erf tCOC 
feet father than at the normal low of *W 
feet. Sheriff Herb Thompson of hard-tu 
Kno\ County* tcportej that, to aeserd 
occasions, Wicopten *«re see^ m niphu 
when 'mutilations oceurrcu. 4 There ve:« 
ilso,copten spottte just o\tt the fcoffr: 
in Jo^a; Where oft f ttty If th, a Honey 
t Creek farmer Vas shot ti fr«n a eoy- 
that bora no identification number* 

In the fall 1974. as the mute 
Upend off in Nebmka. the Byi&i 
mutilation khow worked its way up in: 
South Dakota and m into Minnest: 
Again, copters and bonrg goriaass w 
much fa evidence and the nuthorib 
chose to place the blame on predate! 
Then was one notaMe saeeptiofL C 
hfahloo W. Vorhtes, aa»ociite profess 
of veterinarian science at South Ds&r 
State Urivenfey. said thai ten anJ*r' 
had been examined at the echoed and \ 
some of them had probably* hetn w» 
tated by Homo sapiens. 

In Mt&nesotB* meanwhile; there « 
one caae thax points so * possible %c 
tion <n a part of the mystery* On F;l 
night, October 4. J*?4. a 400-poone S 
was mutilated at Ac Charles Mcz 
farm, tn the cxtmnc southwestern dp 
Urn tfate, . Both «t the bulls <an * 
chewwd/cut off -and ks feted en^ v 
-damaged.* The local W oaid ftat i 
came of death wis bbcUtg, 1 diseu 
the Clostridia family of bacteria*, 
vtt added, however, that there w^ 
sign of «nrg0c, as is usual in w 
bbckleg* wot was then much blood 
in Om Camas, la fact. anltvul 
apparently been tnutBated J 



•THE MUTILATION MYStEKY 
foil a prelude to what 



U 



SKY Most tcrrtfytng hfatt, Bankston corned fimt the onhnot mutihthtiicrt 
hall htrt celt hum-sac, or human sacr tqe. :>>»y;^ 



caused by disease. The copier-cruising- 
fcilanitt hypothecs was so compelling, 
however. that no one was yet ready lo en* 
lensirt the theory that the bull had been 
Jffjt-tfttf *fth Clostridia bacteria or tox- 
in— perhaps tor experimental purposes. 
For indeed, how difficult it would have 
been for • bunch of airborne turkeys to 
Jocaic a cold, dead animal in the dark! 
And potlHfcath mutirt would have had to 
be ready for weird smclU also, as the 
fumes from a rotting cow causes one to 
seriously consider puking a* a h!gh- 
priority activity, * . „\ ' 
■ * * » . * ■ * ^ ^ 

The Incident that ultimately brou|Jht 
the UFO-slcuth nexus into the unite pie- 
turc occurred in mid-December J974, 
when a cow was found chopped up at the 
farm of Frank Sehifclbita, near Kfnv 
ball Minnesota* At the same time, there 
were a number of UFO sightings in the 
ftate. After a rather cursory examination 
of the mutilation site, * Minnesota flying- 
saucer buff (snd avowed Sasquatch con- 
tactcc) named Terry Mitchell can* to 
the conclusion that hovering aliens had 

* burned a high-energy ray at the cow, 
'There were also auspiciously broken 
buncho, undoubtedly caused, so Miich- 
fltl theory went, by heedless sauccrjtc 
aeronautics; and then there wt strange 
jodeftttiions In the ice on the farmers 
fond— obviously gouged by UFO landing 
t^r— ar*H peculiar circles in -the snow, 
which appeared in an aerial photo. 
*:>!itchea weal on to postulate: dial 
UFOlk like steak as much as most Amer* 
leans— although, again, the pans of the 
onimal taken were those seldom found in 
any hut i weirdo's casserole. Neverthe- 
less, 'MiicheM theory created t media 
tap that culminated in, a telephone, fatter^ 
»fcw en Tom Snyder's hfSC rottwro** 
AewtnUtcMft, 

was at this point that serious saucer* 
jtudrots decided to get into the caw. Dr. 
J. AUen Hynek, director of the prrv 
ligioui Center for UFO Studies end pro- 
fessor of astronomy at North wetfem 
Unjver-ity, Jud a friend in Minneapolis 
who had done tome fkld*in*cstigation 
work for the center in his fctsure time. 
-This man was Donald £. FEfcitngcr* a 
epeosl agent for the Treasury Depart* 
vest's Bureau of Akehol Tobacco and 
, Firearms, and in January IWS, Dr. Hy* 
pek ofced htm to fcavesiigaia j*e Minm* 
aou mutilations. 
F&kiagtr twvekd to Kimball, Inter- 

* 4e*r* Prank Sehifctbien aad rapidly 
wenothhed the UFO hypothesis. Toe 

; saucer -landing divots In the pond turned 
' OU to be watering notes chopped in the 
jet; the tree brandies had been broken by 



the wind and by Sehifrlbfai himself; fh* 
sauce/ tl rcfes were xtually siaw-covered 
Sit age pilct 

Word spread qtiklly among UFO re* 
searchers actus* the United Slates that the 
highly respected Dr. Hynek had taken an 
interest in the mutilations. One of those 
who heard the news was lerome Clark* 
■ UFO icvtiKhcf of aonte rcknown. who 
had been investigating the cattle mtntta* 
tiom since they first occurred in his home 
state of Minnesota in the spring of 197). 
Clark wrote to agent FKckingcr in Janu- 
ary 1973 and related the etlcfatiofts of a 
Convict named A. Kenneth Ba&LstocL 

entuiatan 
During hb many months of bivestiga* 
tioru dark had talked with Ross Do>ca, 
a Kamas state senator who, -in late 1973, 
had found a 500*pound heifer dead on 
his farm, with a six-inch bote carved hi 
its belly. When I report of the incident 
was carried in Kansas newspaper*, Doyen 
told Clark, be was contacted by Bankston, 
who at the time was serving t sentence 
for bank robbery at the Uiwwrth, 
{Kansai> Federal Penitentiary, BanUtt* f 
wrote to Dojen that the mutt butons were 
fhc work of "a clandestine society of 
Satan, which had decided to expand its 
public vkKxancn. , - - , 

Do>en did not place much, credibility. * 
in Bsnk»tou*s story, but this did not deter. I 
Clark from calling the warden at Leaven- \ 
wonh and, obtaining ptftnUsioo to\cor* 
mpond with the inrnate/ . * * *i 
* K-rThtre folded an !Achange>of ktteri. 
in which Bankston*s fim missis— dated 
fanuary Z3 t 197*—toW Clark that Ihis' 
eultbof Saun,** that iu mecutvrs scarfed 
the animals' blood with hypodermic noe- 
' dies and that the animals* "lex organs, are 
vtakfn for «... fertility rit<L^ Banksioa 
' sAeged in subsequent letters thit the tamij 
Cult was also involved In tome w»y whh 
the bombing of the Army main* lab it 
the University of WuoMsin ta August 
1970, o grim deed that left a university 
nseaitber dead. .Most terrifying +t all, 
Bankston claimed that the animal fnuti- 
lanons are but i prelude to what we shaft 
■ere cati hum-sac, or human sacrifice. 

Bankslott was quick lo sdt Clark thai 
he wanted lo help authorities round op 
the cuhists, but he was afraid of it* 
frisab within she prison system. He asUd 
that Clank Intcrvfnt lo have bun and 
some other possible informants it* 
waved to a jail in hlinnaota whet* they 
mud talk more freely. 

Clark could wot help Bankston and 
had aUowed his correspondence with him 
lo tapir by die lime he contacted Flick* 
infer in early 197$. When FfcUnget met 
with Clark shortly thereafter and heard 



mote details of die "cult of Satan,* t v * 
seeds of a large and mysterious FeJt-_ 
Investigate were brought .to shoo: 
osw the peat few months, the cattle n-r 
titations spread ttU a psj^hotk epIJex z 
feto 22 Western states. , 

ttft glNCSTON ICgtf AltO 
At-FKckingerls surging. Out wr;i 
ogatn to Bankston, who bad been trtrj- 
fcrrcJ to Marion Federal FenHentiarv 4 
0uiois- Bankiroo replied with mtnl ir- 
lefs. and the horrifying aHe^atiom c:^ 
dnued to Bow. In a letter of January Si, 
1975, for instance, Bankston avtnvs tzz 
bull pn organs bad been embedded - 
At bodies of a young" runaway c?w7 t j 
murdered aomewhen in the 
Bankston aho continued to ask thai he dc 
transfened lo a Minnesota prooo, »>*rx 
be would be safe from inmate repinls. 

FStkbger contacted she United l^s 
District Attorney's office in hfinrwL?; 
Es, and the US- Attorney approirs, 
Federal fudge Hyfes tori a reiprr-r 
Minnesota liberal Jurist. Judge Lord «s 
tactcd the warden at Marion Penher^r 
|o explore the posstbilitici of a transfer. 
' When be learned of fudge Urd \ ± 
teres^ howe^vr, Sbnt 4on wme to Clzsi 
and expressed tone fear at the prwpe^ zi 
being ren>o^toa*Mimtfapoliaj^u- X 
said that he feared a grottp of tt' 
oriented biten *ho were heavily mc- j 
in the nsutilationa and some otwhc^*.. : 
ietievtd. had contacts within hw<tf 
menf cirtleC The group' wis ioclteJ £ ^ 
^MinAeapolU area, and if they shoi^ ; 
hip to the snitching, they might haft i + 
What he wanted,, Bankston saidV 
small county jail, out el the wpy. * 
- - Bankston mbo urged that the sjir* 
ties bring to Minnesota for qucsitajr 
former Leavenv^imb inmate*frieni: c: 
Cnamad Dan DugaflLDugan: *h4 w^ 
ierving time at LaTuna Comet!* 
itituUon in Texas, had actually, so i - 
atooa'ciaim went, been a men:**: 
the satanie society and bad panVr* 
in iu rituals— including the drtii 



It appears that the most mr.pt 
reason for lud> Lord lo fasue an : 
to bring Bankston (and later D»';~? 
Minnesota was the former's «i?r;: 
taken very aeriotn!y i • 
\ oSat then - . 
Ime ri can s ^r i^ 
1hem potttkal tibetab-Hwte were :: 
taiod by the aotfiteton. Mmne^ : 
•tor Hubert Humpbrty, a ctose fr^r. 
LordX was on the alleged Ik * *■ 
tthe names of newieasten. mer zc 
Congress and even movie actr^ 
Novak. Acoofdtngly, on Fcbncrv 
l97J,Bank&n JCo*tht*t4*nrt; 



f 



i.?. 
15 

ill 



J? \ 



T11E MUTILATION Mv£ M He saU that the cult members h ">fltt«f about fiumdh iacrifciZs 'jkt . 
* itexf step, but he had thought they were fust engagfae In Satanic »v$ and " 



f ) 



scribed was ilt-Ceiiceslin; It wai «• 
trcmely ami-bhtk and anti-Mexican. Its 
adHerents. in /act, cooU be calkd SaUrv 
necks. AnJ what was the tame of this 
organization? 1a bit letters— and 1 h*ve 
seen some 15 ol them— B^nUion ft fen 



* Authorities In Gezad were tftformiJ 
of Dug story god at scon is the 
tMii mclicd fit was March), pefice spent I 
nuey long howi looVIng for Ac bodice - 
but no skeletons **rt found. > . . - # 
During interrogation, B^nUion reptiv 



J 6?" 

r * 



:1! 



■A- 



ft 



2 

I* . 

Si 



life 
1 



1 



ft 
If" 

<:t.^ 

8ft 



fCeniiniierf /rom p*te 331 taken 
from Mirk* to the DakoU County Jail. 
m Histiagt. Minnesota, by U.S. Mar- 
shals, Oft February ISih. stent Flickittgcr 
conducted hti first interrogation; with kirn, 
at observer^ wcte Icreme CUrft tod f 
former Army p«raUoop commando 
named Brad A>crs, active wiih the Center 
br UFO Studies* » • - 
. While .claiming not to hsve beta i 
member of the rninQaiion mob himself, 

Bankiioa alleged* vurmg iU Interview . *7«" ™— - tr.^ ■ ^T^ 77 

tfuc be hid been In coireipondenc* with by the cult io Fon Worth. Te«t iroumJ ui» ttpV^vet expert, 
divene neiabeit .«f lh< mob around ihc 1965, lie w« into drugs it the limt f ^e opoUnued, *u l**t%*d k • theft ; 
rAfttV«*^-*^^fc^ -4ttg^i*i&ui-1M.p*!* worjbioe«9fTered fbjiomum fa Otbhoma Id toie I* r 
heird about the froup from oiher inmatei * Sim ewdta'ar**ci other ittotei ^ifc!^^^:^^ 



lo the uvtiuiot* tlmj>ly n the Octuh; w >d Ws tili^ioa that the owJ!«©n «a 
Kcktnjef, ho**v*r< both E*nUk» md ' km*rtd somehow b Die JW b^^I 
Dugin nihied a Wcll-inown mtfonil »t the Vclwutf ol Wjcot^ji. Ihu Lrrc 
oreantiatioa devoted lo the worship he nvneJ t man whom he tod I net is 
of Stxuu • twvtnwortl Feoitotliiy it fcivw* w?- 

Diifiwi dsi^ to have beta foennied- pUe4 the ^pt»w* used by the bombm 



nj had recorded his eon*emtioni in » 
notebook crammed with priftotvcell goe* 
pp. He then outlined i scenvto that 
ihed hf,ht on many poxzUnf aspects of 
Che mutilations. 
-Bmtuton aucfted that the group used a 
. fowexfui animal tranquilizer called fCf 
.*> calm the cattle. They next held 
; . intyt oiiriie to an anlmaVs nose to cause 
\ iu* heart -to beat rapidly, then withdnr^ 
, Wood via i W|e veterinarian tyriftft. 
" There were no footprints because the men 
, walked on pieces of cardboard; m anow r 
Ihey usad bto^orches to meh the tracks 
* around the animals. One reason for em- 
*Jng evidence. Bankstoo claimed, wis so 
* 'that die ^iritKiUtions *oul^ appear in be 

thtwork of eauaterrettfials. . . 
< Banksion stated that at Leavenworth 
\ Penitentiary around 1969, be had^mn ih* 



Citbhoma'rf RaVfcf WrWfJ 

Cutonium in her basement Vtlut »- 
mlfyint was the po^stbHity this ft* 
pluionJum theft was connected lo fhect* ; 
^ Karen SUk wood. Siikwood «ed 
mysterious circumstances fe KovtT.sr 
1974, nhlte tawtifaUni appafW - 
k&propritOea «t n ptutonlunvparl^ 
plant. Kerr-McCee's Cimarron 
- in Crescent. Okbhomal ' * • % -. 
* Mulooium is exitemely eamnrjr,, 
and. h one of \he deadltcU of po^ ^. 
*Mly 4.4 pounds of it axe needed to mi^ 
* an atomic bomb pwt rf ul enough tttfr 
out the dowmownrtf % city. WV« £. 
. wood dioi in an automoWk accident, s^ 
. had with MaCUof inmiipuve gxl l 
was a Sasaoifi n&itesz .m^ohix to paVtd Bunthamof T*cAt 
tiwork TV aeria) One r^k^r^f. Jha daV Wu^lw^iy^ 



into chopping up small animals and twng 
their pans in ceremonies. The man who 
Dugan said recruited him also happened 
lo be a helicopter pilot and a suspected 
smuggler and dope dealer. Authorities in 
Ttju* Liter placed him vmfcr surveillance 
to fee if he was piloting any wbiriybini 
sallies of fetan* - 

' lankston and Dugan supplied a Etf of 
- jnuiilaiion-mob members and many of 
them were found by authorities to have 
a Vaeiground in occult pcacuces and 
.criminality.. One woman on the list, for 
imtinct, had been arrested in \H9 tot 
robbing grsva fa North Dakota. (An-, 
other allegation would, if -pfoyid* k*ve 
Vwint m*i there 
with her own network 



when friends eeafcbad bar 
rtbe'fitt wis mkuru> B^ik^Xjehi^ 



obvious great fw of the Satanbi aotey. ' 'isad vcrtemdy Wmse iht |ni^5 
Qugan told agent FJiUuoger that he sob as it ripped & plvrtonkam tor r 
Sin to drift away from jfce'Satiuta , a domestic terror weapon. & \ 



begin ^ 

when be was actually exposed to hurrv. 
aac Ha said that the cult members had 
yjk«*ibotft hurroj! sattince as the next 
cfep v but he had thought tfcfey wcriflMst' 
ongap'ng in aaianie Jive and hyperbole. 
But in 1M5. Dugaa cUimcd. he and eight 
Other manh e rs we're camped oA n 4ake 
Mir Corari. Wehrukx. preparing for 1 
ceremony. "The group 'hod been, Ming 
TCF So iftnquftxc animals and now de- 
cided to try th*4rug out on four yosmg 
campers from Kansas City. MutiUwoo* 
mcmben with trmquiliw hfld then 
&<* the f out youngsters, who died two 
tours later, apparently from fCt c*tr- 
rfosc. Since *e campen wen already 
tod, the group decided to try out to 
namoejes en Ihe deceasad. and withdrew 
Uood a wt wofkedeatarvie cruelties. After, 
ward. Dugan cbinicd, the bodies weft 
cut up and plaeod fa burlap ta^. Dwcan 
•rid that ha Ad not sac what happened 
^bythei^^rJt)atthcbo4ic4wm 
interred ion nearby gn*d pit , 



When Federal offiebh cheeirtVt*: 
attorney accviid by Bankstoo of SU£ 
the stokn ptutontum. It was disc: 
that she dtMy . su: fc«*i b> . 
horns authorities of having eonr^r. 
wiih'i promioeof member of the m Z ^ 



factor that seamed lojpve Dugth etedK 
^ wswi *l icMpirof aTiinopy'hW>- -Mitjv . %ecording^ ^to^a , wd^onnad^ rm 

Oxk • gang and Ait -this • biker nalked- »uree privy lo the wvobgirion. was hb- nh^j ^ po^Vhty th^i v rakwoc< 
* . about earlier cattle eauiilat^es. The biker 
** aho described hh experiences hi the. Air 
Force, where he had driven a general 
" : around to inspect various miuik sOos. In- 
^ffadiag ^rne,inA)v^ He lold Baal- 
SM of an kita to^seiie a mssBa dt one ' 
> of the isolatad sites; assumlog that the 
. missile was aimed with a nuclear war- 
9m th* tftken would thrnfcmlhe. 

oftimiti jansom or tew device. In 
■J AtlSl Oddly enough. atrwge # «^» ^ . 
4 ^seu did hover above Minutemaa mtatile . 
- Aa in Montana, near which there were 
*K oho numerous animat ttotilations: ac- 
cording lo law^nforcemcnt orTWah fa 
Uibnstmn Air Feme Bat 
ecrmmWed )* fig^tcn to inurarp* the By- 
tag Qtjec u uoiuece tif ully. ■ - 
On March l«u\ after ialenriewfag 
' ^Bankston for a enowh.' Federal official* 
Binstomd Dan ©ugsn SO the Dakota 
County laQ from die Taxes prisoru in 

• 'wfckh he was serving e lerm lor crimes 
■dated to auto theft Ougan. though kept 

^ a^art {rem Bankston, confirmed virtually 

* .(gwythtog in Bsntaon's scenario. 

The organ>ttk» 



All in alL the BanbtonVugan ee-* 
, win the tritimau) ta|e of lercor- i 
everything: kidnaped mbtiWsilovrJ 
How In the name of Satan. 
tenor, quarries with buried vktrrv , 
even the ominous ponttery of 
Otodkbrotei end foiwteppy mit^r.: 
among the smm mob's 400 merr -- 
; Because seme of wha| the infer 
wete myfag agreed with £nt*r < 
BbUnncr was feJicvad of his % 
ATF duties and assigned full ter- \. 
nnUations can, under the supr** - 
United Stales Attorney Boben Rrv 
jUfanaapoBs. \ • 
What aetualb went on 
^TonrtaW t«n 

i i 



THE MUI1LATI0N MYSTfcV* Texas had 
Satan. In 1974. a KilgorcToUege student 




iCtntlmteJ from post 92) Investigation 
li unclear, t have read one report, pre* 
pared by Flickinjcr and dated April 10, 
if 75, in which many other reports and 
iftttffrtiom **t mentioned. For a few 
Aoniltt in 1975, the Federal Government 
apparently investigated Satanic organiza- 
tion* and activities all over the country. 

The motives of the informants also 
fttiuta a bit unclear. Bankston. (or in- 
appears to have wanted to make 
, a A jI k> Out he could be transferred -to 
a Mr jail in his hoinc state of Missis* 
upf*: he ako seems fioni hH letters to 
have » anted to make some money from 



head of cattle— In fact there arc more 
cattle than people la Tew— and B k 
obvious Uui • group of moneyed muti- 
lators could chop away pretty much to 
the tune of their own ferity. More than. 
500,000 cattle reportedly die each year 
In Texas from natural eauws. so a few 
hundred moos mutilated by night stealth 
would not be significant 

The Texas mutes reached public at- 
tention fat November 1974 and then ap- 
peared to stop. More e**s occurred in 
Cariy 1975, with parattek fo in 
otltcr states. On January 2f»h, for in- 
stance, Hopkins County sheriff Paul IL 



Satanic suspects In the tnutitations cast* • 
group called the Sons of S*ten. In 1974, * 
a Ktffore College student had written a 
paper in which he said that this group 
performed dawn rituals in which cattk 
were chopped up. The student's theme 
was destroyed by one or more of Jas 
teachers, who Mt that the matcrU *a» 
disgusting. But word of the paper reached 
T. O. Tinslcy, an employee of tKc Tew* 
and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Associ- 
ation," who was Investigating 'the mutt- " 
latium; Tinslcy located the ardent and " 
traveled around Texas, talking with \ 
era! of the student's sources." 



* £ jy^icatioA of to »Joqt. pan Dvfan, ; Jones announced that j Wood -slurping f™* 
dfe.«her pciribiH informant. *an)cd to%*ruup-*g«ihg hscIT tictttvii'i t>i«ipkl' "^Jf 1 ?]* **?S c ^ 



c\dui£c his testimony for a rcductioh of 
hit ktcn-ycar sentence. 

For reasons unknown, Federal of- 
irub decided In the late spring of 1975 
a* I* pursue the Investigation further. 
Oar apparent problem with the inform- 
ant** story was their allegations regarding 
Ae aational leader of the mute mob. Ac- 

•coniinj to Bankston and Dugan, this 
Kid served a sentence Ift Leaven- 
Werth" orr a. bank-robbery conviction 

, .{wbieh was accurate) and had recently 

- ew»eJ to* Austin/ Texas (also accurate); 
however, when Texas reporter John 
ttfc*f obuined the alleged leader's ar- 
M and jail Jiisiory. it indicated that he 
kaf been to jail during most of the time 

*'<bt thefnformanti 'cfa'irhed he wit roam- 



was believed responsible for the mutes.. 
In Kaufman County, cast of Dallas, 
mysterious helicopters were reported and 
police officers started directing their 'spot- 
lights Into 4ie night sky. And Texas au- 
thorities tended to atcribc the mutes to 
those coyotes with table manners and 
stomachs big enough to hold eight gallons 
of moo blood— even though, as fat other 



forma that also called kwli the Son* c; 
Satan; in 1970. a pack of its members 
murdered an Orange County woman and. 
according So a young man who later 
confessed, offered her heart so Satan by 
placing It in the woman's station wagon 
and setting the vehiefc afar. The leader of 
the California Sons of Satan claimed go 
belong to a larger satanic organization 



stales^ there . were instances in Texas tftal *IHl*rty sacrificed *uman victims 

v fci ccrcmooks la Nonheoi aftd Southern 
California. One Colorado investigator be* 
Bern that the S*ns of Satan are involved 
in the mutilation* *nd thaf.the>urpose of 
the mutilations H cUnd^inc b^ctcnotof-* 
fcil-wmrfire research/ 1 fc*m3 no indica- 
tion, however, ehat.the, California and- 
Texas Sons pf Satan were connected. 



where predators had uncharacteristically 
avoided cattle that had been mutilated. 
(Usually, when a cow hes dead for a 
lew days, the ripening fumes spread wide- * 
I:' and predators quickly arrive by land.* < 
air and burrow for the feast.) 
• % - *Aho,«in January; the Forr M'urlh Star* ■ 
Telegram paid for toxicology tests, on * 



leg from state to state performing hema- 
^r-W^emonies.. ... . ,\ . v beife? found near fcownwoc*!. ar*d the* • Between January «S September 1975. 

Ji3me.auth.oritjesbelicve.Jlie BanKston-.! WishcMtdr^inipci^amoitnt VAco- ,|ohn MaWg o(.the Fori* Wbrth Star- 
, frjan affair w# pan of a master escape . tinc"»in thc.livcr* and the blood; nicotine m wjbte a gife df. inkle* orf 

fix predicated on the assumption that is tha Material most commonly used m « mutilationX The articles eventually # 
a imift «ounty jail is easier to flee than .tranquilizer guns. In March, a cow was M^aed tf* attention, of mute-mc* in- 
Sbi| Federal prisdtt On May^l.Bank- chopped up nonh of Big Spring; hs udder lormaot Bankaton. whb began fox^ 
ite did, in fact, escape from the jail in had been removed— hut carefully, ao that 
rbtoka. Minncsott (to which he had I been the stomach lining had not been punc* 

2?*^ iM^nd.jts hean.bau: t^t le^^: 

Uer prisoner, when they were appre- th r0Uf h t hple in its chest. 



bended six hours later. Banks* on insisted 
dtt the other prisoner, a murderer. h*d 
Uced him to go along with the caper. 
D-'pn, rtk^nuhile, had been remanded 
|p Ttx3% and the day Mtcr Bankstoo's 
«|Sc Dupn escaped, too; he was cap* 
aasd on June 19th, during a holdup 
nwmpt in Clenwood Springs. Colo ra do. 
Bankooa later asserted that Dugan had 
eicaped in fear for his life. 



THtrc were UFOs reported also. In 
Cochran County, following numerous fly- 
ing-object reports in early March, two 
mules were found .in a. large wheat field*, 
each lying hi a' circle of borncil, stubNcd" 
wheat about SO feet in diameter. Sheriff 
C. G. Richards checked the circles and 
reported finding some radiation residue. 
. By late March 1975. Texas investiga- 
tors had cot ten word of Ac Federal 



Despite the doubt cast on the satani* 

theory, the mutilations continued to - h wtiption of the mute mob in Maine 
i and to iacrcae in frequency m • aula. As several of vie eupeeteu mot 



trod 

1175. They were bpecially common in 
Texas, where Bankston was to have his 
fcar-fit led innings as welL • 
• 

MNE-CTaa MUTES 

One stare* at a map of Texas, with its* 
254 counties cuctaining some 17,000,000 



me mbe rs in cluding the .leader were 
supposedly residing in Texas, the Stale 
department of puMic safety, as well as 
local police departments, conducted sur- 
veilUnce operations in Austin 
Hurst, Texas, near Fort Worth. 
Texas, however. Bad its 



apondence with Makeig. In which Be 
fepeatul some of his old charges and , 
also c^me .up with aum^ new* opcf tailor- 
made for Texis. thcrt k s£TTiiejsunng * 
the terror that Bankston caused in Texas 
that spring aid summer of 1975. • 

la a smalt city south of Houston, for 
example, Texas Duparunent of Public 
Safety agents called Jogohcr the mayor, 
the chief -of police and the city manager 
aid announced that the town water sup- 
ply was poing to be poisoned by occult 
aermrats. In Mayflower, a aenaO so** 
wear the Louisiana Bolder, m ebcriiTs 
weputy called together the tuwn*s *IW cni- 
aens and eanuunued that tww dt *em 
were going to be mutilated. The sewfc m 
Both places was total fear-Are. • - 
Meanwhile, learning that the JFcdera* 
investigation had been called off, Mjkci; 
began to treat Bantam with vme »u- 
tsocL When BanksuetwmikMintvd in a 
letter that die mutilators werr p*r>t I* 

-in 



. ttie' MUTILAnof^ iVSTERY in Utah, a United Statf\S)epartmenl oj AgrtcuUurt .veh'fiw, 
'• announced that an animal he had autopsled had been Injected with bacteria or a toxin. • 
. ( : ' ^ . , . y : — — 

„ My cow tongue haJ been postm 
in Sacramento, California, anj ihe v 
had used CtiriilnuiS stamps with 
robed ahgch on them. Aha! I Iho 
a clue! For were not Squeaky Fr< 
and tier pal Sandy Good running a; 
Sacramento rijht at that time, acnou 
Imminent gore — anJ were they oot 
attired in red robes and red*icnni» i 
Had ihty tent the tongue? tt *** a 
tion I was never able to ans»er. 12 
I could arrange to hate someoor ai 
girts ff they had *ent the tongue. Sq 
had lunged at Preside*! Ford wfch 
and was in Jail • 
About a. month after I re.wi 



rendezvous in August at the (tig Bend 
National Park in south Texas* Makeig 
contacted the park superintendent, who 

' watched, but no gathering took place. 
When Bunktton promi>ed 10 deliver a list 

. of iroitc-mob names, Makcig waited 
• patiently (or several weeks, but no list 

\ arrived. . ■ • ■ ■ 

; . Bankston then compounded his crcd- 
Miiy problems by hinting that a stock* 
broker^ daughter he had already Angered 
•\as a member of the mute mob was about 

• lp do .something possibly baleful to 

• .Makcig. Makeig took the veiled threat 
_ seriously and gave the Fort Worth police 
~ VVdlominbus jrfat* on )he.mui^mob..* 4 lf I. „ 

•V *jftkty%\'Makcif toltfoic in Severn-" s 



ptopte disucittig deed c*x*uts far bio* 
toxica! or expetbnrntot put pons [empha- 
sis addcdl" The report also staled: "We 
are of the opinion that the human In- 
volvement in mutilations b a /ad gener- 
ate J by publicity and is only temporary * 
A fad! You know: Hula Hoops, phone* 
booth packing, the twist, riots against the 
war, and now rcciectocny and teenagers 
with secret dried udder sacs hidden in 
their closets. The rcporfs prophecy did, 
in fact, come true; the mutilations virtu- 
ally ceased until the fall of 1975, when 
mutilations occurred' in the north* est 
part of the state. . 
There had been mutilations on Opposite 



ber 1975, "J want the police to have 
plenty of leads. 1 * *" • > 

: Around this time, CJ^tain Keith Wol- 
.tcrton, a very diligent investigator from 
the Cascade County, Montana, sheriffs 
department, traveled to Marion Peniten- 
tiary lo g{ve " Bankston a polygraph 
m -examination; Bankston failed on impor- 

* tant questions. Makeig followed up by 
*-\.;$a!ling alleged ipembcr* of the mutilation 

• ind£-including the alleged leader and 
• the woman — *nd found no'tftdication of 

fevolvemcot. • * 

■ I* early October 1975, Makeig wrote 
i scathing a ruck in ti*'$w*Tttewm 
'tfdoounring snotf of Baruuiun's a!U^a- 



<[on* • as . >^*jy/pg . Mk 
.babble. Bankston *as fm*h 



fmiJicd in Teus. 



sides: of* tolorado -In^ovtmtier'- 1974*} longC^ however, I *a%fa Boulder. 
They spread in the spring of 1975. and 
by the fall, animals were being carved up 
all over the state. Ftbert County, in par- 
ticular, experienced a summer and fall of 
terror of the tort that talk-show comedi- 
ans ascribe to U*e streets of New York 
City/ People were afraid to venture far 
abroad in country where • helicopters 
hovered *t night and anusk&s cattle ky 
st iff a.nd mutilated in .the dawn. • , 
• 'Despise the organized efforts 6T law- 
enforcement officials, the mutilations con* 
tinned unchecked in Colorado until the 
Yr>t incus fell iiVtKe fall; then they cam* 
lo a virtual hah. The investigators had 
gotten wiser over the year lhry now. 

if. 



lido, for a poetry reading and a k 
and I decided to drive down to 
County, which hid been bauly 
the 1975 mute wave My family 
dtove along Colorado** Roxxu t 
area of vast terrain and fences fh. 
for mites, broken occasionally by a 
entrance* • * I # * " * * * 

When we ermrd ttXiowi the c 
aeat, I went Jo the sheriff's oSsct 
learned that a mitigation had |w 
covered that veiy 'morning. -As J 
talking with undcaheriff Bai Wau^ 
deputy Bill fcrr, sheriff George Y. 
returned from the C^obdo Statt'l: 
Itty laboratory in Ket Cottm. where 
taken the eninui-^* fcmsfc $ScrtS 
4or< an '-autopsy* La|c* +op.: jm . 



% WiffiO£RAKOM-CI«nEa 



^Unded* to * dtsooaet' any *jmatvcmc*t 

* Wood drankeis.or sex<razcd Saunas; if * of the sheriff* pos*^ flopped by— t 
«uch weir Jos weic involve^ the thinking /dmicd'pwn with sihTT-hjckkd be! 



^* '^venVs^ 5mr-TWri'ro*i anicle*a>-v w«nt,.to laoked ai 1 

* 'Reared, howeVer;routita"tiorti were^iscoY- *0*ef for the real^illaios in-the chojKipa^ fnmkjy^'as v MWe H4ggST}TI- ti 



Reared. I 

tied in ten more sutes. and were beoom- 
• faig .inci^singly weird; in .Montana and . 
"New Mexico, for Instance, "wounds were* 
/ (bund to have serrated edges. In Utah, a 

United States. Dcpartnsent of Agriculture 



%aftd. The cooveriadotr w^i" fcouv 
/myvhyownhncuabov;naixcoa • . mutildiioos. • . 
• 1 did not wint to^ecooK* invoNtd^ta v Bbert County Ka4 h*d fas Bm n 
this ease, lo New York, where t ivc, tioos in earty April 1975, and w 
there kid been several small items about visited* fc luly, the number was 
A 'veterinarian announced, that .an animal- the ^mutilation* so Ac press fas early. JO; the figure was to swell to arei: 

dips to my fck Vfill llS Tc^iyVas a ttweX 



t had auiopsied had' been injected with 
cteria or a toxin; his superiors told him 
If he didnl shut up, he would be fired* 
>*Ip. Oklahoma— ^here the it had been N 
i** mute ft port in 1974— citizens ?nd 



1975; I had added the 
marked ln*ac (animal saainces) — 
opened -during my investigation of the 
Msnson dan in 1970 Oftd 1971— and 
forgotten about them. My mind Jhad bttn 



f^y • ta "«?.*7 0 * c -bdmbardcJto' too many yurvvUh tort 
• ' riSTJSrj^S?! WJZZSZ ^. a*! I ««y ^iVmpite from 



•-David Borcn ordered a full investigation 
: under the aegis of the Oklahoma Depan- 
/ : merit of Public Safety, which, after In* 
' tvestigatiog 26 possibly mutilated animals 
. land consulting various patholughts, theft 
^Invcatigitofa ana radiation experts, iasue< 
• a report dat«d March 3, 1975. 

The report was a ssasurpicoe of accu* 
, The animals had died of "natural 



1 And who w«s chopping away at 

s? -It was the opinion of the box in which resided a large 
**-force members that the human' in- *' tongue. 1 instantly recalled *y file 



the image* of violence and wsuff-bulTery, 
especially regarding the killing of cattle. 

Then one morning— h was June It, 
1975—1 received a phone call from the 
office of my literary agent- The caller said 
tf»t a package forwarded lo mi from the 
publisher of my Mamon book w^ 
ingodorifcrousness. Upon my urging, the 
WTapptngs wxre removed; inside was a 

of 



tuiv***^: t» t; ^rri^-jJ t> H*-*K*id»^k 
"WBempting lo pet in on a fad or ponng 

4M 



muttUim ctipv and the fact that tongues 
ere often mming trum the ammah. 



mutilators, as there were only thre 
HTs officers to com LS64 suture r 
totresnelV rvgg^l land. And the Y 
Igrs^oo ooc cou!d c^tch thcrx T 
ceri would gd.cfcw. and then tin 
would vanish. Ihc sheriff tbid n«e 
Vietnam the copter pilots had tea 
hug the landscape even in rugged 
ao as to muffle their own sound. 

There was an unstated attitude 
. the.sheruT and h».men that, becu 
implications, was awful to* think 
Someho w, in smm way, tisg 
is involved in the aautilaiiunv 

* task* pr aium%Toas- 
It was alnivct dark as we ! 
AcrilTa affix and drvn-e wen 
«itJO*a aiuua «u*ju: J J 



"•...it,, • . • * * 

Sprtagi. Naturally, I wa* eetnninY *ae 
Mid for flying mute iquadt. Suddenly 1 
* la* t lirht apjv*r under the ctoudt. 1 wei 



fftt IHVtSTJGUO* OftOUCI iNTCftiTATE- 

uutoa CAte/* I looted for vt entrance 
m fte gruing range, envisioning a cran- 
oatmtry chitt-efter ev3 Satan ectenthtt. 1 
stopped the car and *ot out to linen for 
jk *Jiimng of ccpttr bl/dei; tin, the 
Sjht M .dbipft ired, >nJ ihtrt .wai 
/M*w< MJ^bul drl«c tmwfd- I %£k 
fcrfktg a mixture of tUupprffiimcm ml 
fblioe^I mean, vbo «at!y wwu to 
im « titfwbif wUn airiwrp* wgW-u 
fvofenEnub? And the ugly headlines: 

1UTIOK . tKVflTltATC* MAUXD TO 

**M «c,nndnu^l however. were t 

'•Huj*^ > kKjny WV.tf "Which 

«v pulling * large thiny white trailer 
. and mult hai* been traveling at IS miles 
per hour. 1 tried to catch tip. hoping to 
copy down the license number, but 
{ouidnt keep up; The trailer, I decided, 
. vas definitely large enough to carry a 
■uG atltopLcr* and ! had just auggeiicd 
• tt «me*oe at* the fherilTt .office that 
\m)bc Ac stuff mot was using trucks to 
.tnporr fcipicri ^np jht ^dnhy o( 



ttench. bier; I wit locating with the 
efcirf Imrigit&r at the dittrict attmvy's 
dkt la Trinidad, Cokndo/ Liuu 
9a«Jk abou: th* theory that the tuuuli- 
t» a ere port of a hacurWopcal-war- 
afrfaWh" >r^ct7 r Wed WroOa 
the Urging Ifci or giwnd-fupport 
that the 1 muuUtkm* fnofr would 
M*t fa «nkc opcratafVkh 
adtiy Bid impunity, a * v 

jwad.*,he replied. ^iiufflbatut' . 
Jtataeaince people en the- around with 
■Kb." He maikmed • taochet in Kim, 
Cetondo, who hid (hoc at tod bit eat. 
'I then tsfced, .*£>o you have aoythinr 
Mkif while vub ptiDhu white tnilmr 
* Aid be replied: n'eeh, Teu» piein; 
jeahewt da" . * ■ i j^vf- . 
•■■ Gtredo went c* to" describe w r** 
Ctfendo reach thai -he- tanr is ** 
■wrf ne*vy security— with guami, fuan) 
dtfL, chtbwt acent muttt, and to forth. 
He nacb in owned by awn* ten of 
4m Mad," he aoatiaued, -&3* «m 
m abee when they bad tales abetn 



W aaU. taailkJ* 



1c armed rmnch to take photoi of the 
wJwkt and th* doctor had catted Bp 
4* bed Federal Aviation Mrttohu** 
te aAce to conpUn: «Mn nAcuk 
thaadvl lobe iikr*cdm** the prop- 
arty.tk doctor itfiwd/ t • . 

*We Sad Aet ie^ Aoat dam 
3r>^* 9iiodr ^aiat "That aatup h 



THE MUTILATION MYST^kY j /«r « f./ia« &f«t cbleto deterge, ft wtu Investigators in 'Colorado 
• who first suggested that I iterlohgtcahwarfare research was be. )/ the mutilations. ffl^J^Jfap::' 



4* •" 



perfect: They've got ft van; they>e cm 
" ill the found support in thai van putting 
that trailer; ami tbt chopper h in the 
trailer* Tht chopper* the Investigator 

* CHitmttd/couU be put in the air in a 
matter oT minutes* * 

* > tacTCJtiDLdbfCALw'AitrAftt^ * * 

As far a* 1 have been able to determine* 

* & ms investigators in Colorado who first 

* amgnted thai batterWot»cat*warfare re- 

. aearch was behind the riuiirbtiofis— tfur ' 
eplmatt uerc being Injected »iih bacteria 
or toxins and that gtiruk and other (bra 
- yen being removed to test .the effects of 
igenta^ Th© jftoti^tqn, the. theory > 
r Vent were deliberately frying* to purthe * 
Hume en UFO* or satanftts or predaton 
as a cover for whal wu realty going on. 
* The theory has s&me appeal* as ft makes * 



die whnte pScnoincnon more cogent, 
§nd it makei many things about it very 
understandable* 

Vacieriotagical and chemical-warfare 
research, eittpr for purely defensive pur- 
poses, luv been banned in the United 
States since 1970/ The bin grew out of 
an incident tnjUtah in Marti MM* uteri 
thousand* of sheep mere aeeidenuity 
killed by ttejJIy VX two* pi that ap* 
pa/encly fkqt cJ my from the Dvgoay 
Proving Grounds,* *» bactcriofagieal- 
warfare research center located south*?*, 
Of Sah Lake City* The Army paid local 
jsnchcrs something tike, t3?£ t 0()0 in 
•Afna^trft^aniiflellhrfp. 

After that tittle ovine indrfemtton, 
there »as tremendous pressure* particular* * 
ty in Utah, to ban such research and 



tfevelopftWnt, Trf^Jtnt Richard Niton 
himself ordered a.haH to the bioIetfeJ 
and chemical programs and the destruc- 
tion of eOttfof stock piles/The order was 
framed fit November 1*6* and sent to 
Fcdtral agencies In Frftfuary W'd^ - 

• Not aU Government agencies compEeJ 
with the Presidential order, fcutever. 
Senator Frank Church*! Senate Select 
Committee on Intelligence found earlier 
this year that the CIA, for instance, had 
Stored, a quantity of cobra neman and 
enough taiitoiin (hhcllftth lurinj So Utl^ 
hundreds of ihousand* of humaftC $M> 
lor Church's committee aho found that * 
^P v U4ad«ockeda^yinany^^Hterf 

.oftoiI*.viiL*oc^^ 
genus. One of the theories in the ttwlti* 
sute mutilations cave b that a rogue ber.2 
of. researcher? is working wkh haetetia 
of the Clostridia genus. " • * ' * * * 
There are some 91 species of Ctatld- 
U. among which are several diseases thai 
iflltct cattle;- these include bbckkg (Ovx- 
iridium ctarirQ and malignant odsma 
ifhttfUtum jftik*m\ Clostridia attack 
bumaaa, also. Tfunis * 
Omrridia {CkstrUwm frtml} mod ftoe- 
of the «*rffcTs most potent loxmi la pro- 
duced, by Chptidiutn bot^nMm (which 
chutes boSuliuhh nceordbl to Seymour 
Uv&% C*e#»iSrrf *pf AWe^uf 

>cithf «uta*»<f ^nfimot* Ionia #ouU 
iNomfeatty tiU evcr>body h the vwkt 

* la virtually mry state **^re twtft* 

1ft tone am. two «cQ4of onaed 'Cc\d~ 

.Mp bynxwely 4wdM-bboniMy arpeni 
prepared ty A* su(t fovenuwat wts> 
fttorp-ft ki» m« .tsen chvx«4 ^ 
itpeiu cxy'the mm Km Ibem' sup* 
prated. The wctUnfoimad 'kw«U|Koc 
Cirade. for.infUiwt, toU^M ol i ftou* 
buffalo tfttt wu PHOliHd w » see i 
Cofendo Spnap OB October 21.. IV*i- 
•An aufopey mi 'ptrtwmSl*' CWi? 
■aid. "tad Men of a chemical fmifn 
#te animat woe fouiU io it* Uoci arcc~ 
lop. tAcr (bat tey danpad ikwB « a 
Tbey dttit-Irt- another void pul" t: 
Fbw CbMnty.^CotonJo, nndenher^ 
Oafy-QMa. «bo oaordbaMd nuch c: 
•any MOatiooa auntfesrierr ta *j 



ttut a damp 
•4uently put on lefts at Ac tibontpnc 
tm by the Colorado Surau of Invc<- 
gttioa In Dcnm a*! at Ceteada Si^f 
Omvtnity in Fori CoKm. : 

•ut why j*uU an apeney "«f tbr 
C uiu r ^to *L>k ^otjTJiikJit p^rig^-U * 



/{ \ i 

The Colorado Bureau o( Jnvc*^ 
ofltcbHy beg^n In investigation of tht 
mutitations in the summer of ltf ; at 
the urging of Governor Richau D. 
Umm; however, its report — *hich was 
ideated to November— showed thai 
sane investigation had been done as 
early ss April 1975. The report was 
Used on some 2QJ Incidents of apparent 
Btftibtloo: the conclusion was that 95 
of thfc mutilation* had been 
caused by prcdatora. , 

This prompted a fcross-state chorus of 
«*trs and jctrs flooj local law-enforce* 
sent officials, who must have begun to 
faTtfuttbc CB.1. was tfeating tbcmlike 
a bunch of dumdums. Moreover, of the 
jftto number oT.eaimals chat* the C£,l»* 
hhuiwi io *hk\% b::- s>?ffH up Sy 
hmn hand, all had first died, the report 
Med, from "natural causes/ 1 The impli- 
cation, of course, was that ranchers had 
dcypoJ the animals up In order to collect 
money for malicious-mischief 



j 



djfpj^Jpd^njo,} ranchers noted, Juv- - 
ew, thai the report was ya|ue as to this # v 
•eamag of "ruiural causes.* 

tut It *a* future* that ultimately shot * 
top the GM.Vuf relator story, -as rr- ; 
torn Dorothy Afdridge, elf the Coio- 
m3*1 Sprint* CouUe Tcftgrop/C has 
wacry observed. A blizzard in.Novcnv 
far 1975 Ut thousands* of cattle dead 



'I. 



aa the range and the coyotes of th: West lea: Sat of icejningly impossible. surferv 
,nsu en, instant cattlc-gorg* maneuvers. . whereby .the antmaU* hearts had been 
S*>*fc Xl^rid^chec^d isitlTtic tip 



fcrfof plant at Tobune, Kansas, which 
filmed 30,000 of the ravaged carcase 
: i^ll»'lHmtfd v that thrtpreditoa 

no qtbafls, *ars, jtecp/ or othe* 
tomtit treats of.th* mutilators. So miich' 



Amoved*- U'ftiutH tKotiC^'tffcSbm too' 
email for the bovine heart. There had 
been*, two * such heart attraction*-- on* 
smites f otmdnear'Wsfscnburg. Colorado. 
■Whcfc Susan CottV.did^V auropsfr err 
that one heifer^ Girodo said, "I told her, 
icrthe C pJ, report %\ \ ; ; . „i:iM± try and get tfct^eaftoutotthc**.** 
fa the fall of 1975, investigator Cirodo t /showed her the way it appeared' to 
rrakged for Or . Su&ao Colter, director have been done on two other animals, 
ef the Trinidad, Colorado, Animal Clink; And she said. There's no way you can ' 
t> conduct a field autopsy on a jnutfliied\Wfc/. ShtiriW^^ shecouldnH^otL-* 1 
kritct whose carcass had been discovered- .Wash possible. I began to wpnder, that 
fas than 12 hours after death. the mutilators were using razor -sharp ex- 

. "Was it *a. healthy hei(crT*I later * trading devices— «iroiiar. aay, lo core 
■M Girodo. t • samplers Hied in geologic dritlmg^-in' 

>!Btfnitely/* hr icpCcd. TAs a. matter -order to aeerf otjt glands, or Jiearts or 
ef fact, tike rancher had her fattened tip whatever "the. they needed for " their 
sedreaJy to butcher.* • • ancarch? That way. assuming that k*s 

- Or. Colter removed various parts of 
fc animal including tfie heart, hap. 
kidneys and liver, and tent samples to a 
Moratory fee analysis. I called up Or. 
K*cr to mk tee If a Ooatridia . had 
boa found, and she told m that, fa 
feet, a euhurt of CbttfUwm sortf* had 
tea imsd from the ted animal. The 
favr organs of the fmhly dead animal 
fad already earned to mta h . a character- 
Ucofcfastridialmfection. - 

Cirodo had also asked Or. Colter to try 
w clear up one uf the mutilations mysten 



form of toxic research, they would 
have been able to stand at some distance 
from the animal so as afco so avoid aeU- 
tap from germs and poisons. 

CHormsAH0W|aen.ga ' 
Colorado k a tey Oate M the nuclear- 
defense apparatus of vie "oitsd States. 
The state contain* several military bases 
and missile fatfalbtions, aa wdf as the 
Air Force Academy, in Colorado Springs. 
One would think, then, that the military- 
imdligencv agencies wuyld have gotten 



on ihe. stick -a*), tried to solve * o*|ltl % 
state case jn . which hciico?tcr4}orne 

^ir«5.v,vi&it^aw^ #r:- k »} 

' Indeed, there here alarming reports • 
that m>tiertous helicopter* >tie am 

»«hovcrink abovc» nuclear-mhwlc\ fastalla-.* 
lions. Sterhnf ioti^^voCwi^'itpcn^ . 
KU lacksdn' told me , of apeoding long; 

% fights duting • helicopters il northern* . 
Cotorido;'where <heti are puny # 
tieman mosaic ailor operate!! .by the.' ' 
Air Force. The area has also experienced 

• feotond heavy wave* of mutilatk»K£91fc . 
don*t know if thcre ; s any connection wish m 
the mutilations.* he told mc in February 
1976, **ut there have been incidents hctc 

' in the past month of ah individual or in- . 

• dHahuh tC)ing $o jbrc^U into two oC'lfee 
•fastaliattonw And missiles at both sites, ac- 
cording to information thai I've got. have 
nuclear warheads.* 1 . 

lacksofi detailed one incident fa 
northern Colorado bto fa 4hr summer of 
1975 similar to that which happened at 

.MahmuoroAir Force Rase fa Montana 
tfwt roOowing November. One mitt, at * 
about ten ottuefc. facbun and tow- 

, oa foesesoerf pmomel laduding gome* 
one from the Air Fbrotv began diasing 
what appearod lo be three different flying 

'objects. "We. chased thex things -until 
about fburnMrty fa. tha wotting before 
they disappcartd over a o^silc site in 

^ . Ill 



TIIE MUTILATION 
• down and that %yetrjioi 

— ( 

*Hitfc*<t(ern Nebraska. They just flat 
disappeared off the ridar." 
,*DhI they land?" I ailed. 
"Well* faction (replied. Vc W i 
plane b die air that was on the die and 
taw the lifhu below; it w*s % clear night, 
and when tbe lights wen! out. everybody 
thought, that they'd LinfaL Out when the 
pi UK canie down to 100 to 150 fcvl, the 
pilot couldrrt aee anything • 
• . •What was there?** I asked. 
"The only thing tlut was there was a 



iMTiON^vAy Can it he that US Untied Stable 

that nre free Jo perform drooling flamenco W (ftp out mhs!te-slh hatches 9 



Sierlinf In a remote area called Chimney 
Canyon. Tlwrc's al*olutely nothing up 
there. The animals were mutilated on a 
big ranch, and jmt out of curiosity, the 
sheriff took a Cci^r counter along and 
got a reading on both animak around the 
head and am*— but not on the rc*j of 



bticn* consists, of edenttst* whei 
fired In 1*70 when die Kiuhi kin eit 
bactcriologfeal-wart jre research went in:j> 
effect; .somehow, ihe story goe<. 'the** 
apostles of germ ft* aubieyieatly ob- 
lained clandestine funding from the Gov«> 

their W^'lSftlSlrf- 2Ef£^^ 
radioactivity at . mutiUion W k ^t^^J?^*^^ 
Wyoming aha ft-id^ researdi. icrhap, In ant<ip*i 0 :ii 

The thought that radioactive-mutant !L5sSfJ!i2 **% f^wmienl bam 
bacteria, or pcrhap* a bacteria taJfeac •^^-i"** , • * W 
i^M^. t..: Y— One of the fruit powlbflit** b that/ 



• rftob Jackson said. live-material mickey, are being slipped to «* «* potionttie* - la Hut. ■ 

# - " . Ahal I thought^the ultiinate cover! tnimals causes ihe mind to go *H*i*ir oncc targeted ggoimi. 

VU a levaniped missile site as a landing. » . # OricnlaK. the rc*»rch may w *Vc 

•S^!^* 1 ^' 0 '.**'^ • _ tii* Dei* cttve • , , >nir*.t. different human jfcrget. 

1975. when an un^r itiftcd heHcopier had' fa Colorado Springs who began •» ,or » *■* tfe'mucous mc'mhraWes rf s # 

. Hovered above a Straiicgic Air Command u» tt_ mfll i^c eow't tve bohm nr awh^ «k. 



. -hovered above a Straiiegic Air Command 
missile site south of Bushnell. Nebraska, 
then had disappeared into Colorado. 

The only problem with miixilc installa- 
tions a* Unding rones b their sue. Ac- 
jfVJtyttoJpcjison, *c siicj-iiost .pf • 
which are unmanned — ere enaosed" with 
barbed-wire fence ami are approximately 
40* a 40\ There b a itmall shack on each 



cow'a eye posse* progenies simitar to the 
mucous membranes of a particular race. : 
and that tbe cow, therefore, is a perfect : 
aubject on which u> test the effects of j* 0 
.hactcriologieal agenL . 
v ltanao^dedfbjmeto^a^vatfskr^ 
padded walb of ooh^oo. la tailing with ♦ 
reporter Bill Jfendiix of KTV'X-TV b V 



*amctcr with about a foot and a half 
showing abo%-c ^e girounj. Ji would be 
AfficuN iff hide three helicopters in sued 
a amatl apace, unless ithert>a».some son 
. of camoiiffaged bunker nearby. I would 
<*bn 'giieV ih^r the- eien ron*c ■ee\mryU 
. Jrairly intense near a nuke site, but— <ari 
'* be dut the United Sta(ct % nudonr- 



hg into the mutilations in May 1975 # 
takes the bacteriological-research theory' 
very seriously. For a number of years. 
Erianne wat an emftoyee of one of the 
clandestine intelligence, services; he waa 
Mtioned in Europe SL%1«tc^lC^cctaV 
fat in Russian affjin;; later, la the early 

- w a w. inere n a imau shack on each *f !i 5!' 'or a short time.in 

v.-jsitr and fhep there's .the sealed mistfe . Wa>hington. DC. w*th the o«oe of the • fM e hqwt%tr B I kamri uVt t 

* — =- ^ - * — • eurcd nK that he has no current cbnnec- VCWd did work on an aoti-Orienut I 

lion with the Agency; in faet. he seems. # m or toxin; .thc^ruff had been sent f* 
so have joined the ever-gro^iog eoocr- pre^umaBly Uvm Fort Oetrfefc .• 
of pairkxic but<Ticiail former emrkiyoe* . ^ Edge wood AirseiMl^the Mainland i 
of Government imelili|:enct agencies, \ 4 bcrtn of such ffsearchWwhor aclenmci ; 
•- Somtof Errunnc'a Go\ nrrancnt oicn- ^ha4je>tfd.U fc t>rva»tm*V-* \ % 
ences lead him to suifevt that uy revolt * .An ofhcial at Dujgf-ay bad oonftrmed J; 
mufilaiiorw are really tlw work of rope to Htndrix that an cliu group m tbe j! 

, £rbatK cbunsv he '.teP^otef fcaKreicairwh' fk^litkV to jit " 

lr«arcl?&^rt f&T 
atop our . jnii*iic-silo ' conducted by .die U.S. -in jega*l : t6 ',««^ # Tliey •.usually woric^unjer 
.!£ td *< . • V s • A .t. ■ -# ,Ucteyia.- He aa»: ^rhprrwv a meeting .Uborafcnr^condjtiona. bu on two occi- 1 

• > TV ' ^ " • ^ - m A?kto*AO£ltau Hospital hWi Uoc^ the ^^"tfi*^/ 

• # : • fcAWOACTivnrlHO ocrm^ - OWe of the people there was (Secretary o£ powibly fo Minnesotaz-wheje the}* itSe' 

*J recent months, there has been a.! Defense Robert) McNamara. At the fr^y injected range imimah. " 
*»PW.*cg9l Soviet f tinK.l.wwkoifortheSceTeuO'-t«^ 

- <«>IaGom of the Vnited Nations fem»- so it's pretty weU srttlamiated tfa they CtoWtta? Vkty pc^bl>;"Ulfle*aoC^ 
trarfare ban. ' Jack Anderson wrote a ' did ha\e a meeting in regard 'to some tridia is very comrpoo, it hak. ^ccorUini^ 

type of bacteria.- < 

•-What - kind of bacteriari asked . * 
■ -WVHin regard te» Oriental watfare.-. 
Eriannir replied- 

I bad-long heard it rumored that there* 
had been a Government germ-warfare 
jprogram that had been targeted against 
"Orientals. It waa a bit disgusting to con- 




. column to which he itcuud 4he Soviets 
9 • t4 continuing " germ-warfare mearch, 
■ m%k. sutiog that tbe ,V. S. ,h keeping iu 
^Vfeombe to Sesttby 'biological weapons. 
"Both nation** Anderson said, -have de- 

• %ebped new virus aikl Rickettsia strains 
gfainat which the world has no immunity. 

" Tbb has been achieved by using chemi- 
cab, ndiatio*, ultraviolet light and other template, I anusi uy. Ibut let us not forget Edwai ds. 

•twttsTo produce fraaka or mtanu" jthat d* United States Jhas n* besiuied.. »^.io eqjeri 

;r«rnipteis added). " • •* (ho W iefolbnu, «ipolm and the A* •Wtudtia.^cltottlri^W . 

Traces of radiation were, ip fact, found Ibeab agaimt.these aaime people, b it urv opparemfy lo aca if d& panicuhr 

, . ml arveral mutilation sites, one of them, mtonable to think tihe United Stales is «™o *Bi work to the various pans of 

* already Motioned, to Cochran County, capable of devetoping a term, or teiin. the world where the target nee^ftochs. I : 
* Texas. And Bill Jack** aays that radia- iK'nene aftnt, that picked on die en- *kcd tovestigatorCirodo bliy he rfa^upc 
\ 'on waa found at a Miuulation site near ;rymc* of a porwvbr riceT «the mutici might wjm to caue lenpr %td* 

fierting. Coforado: Two of the ourtila- According to the Ikje^riologkal-war* . he replied: cWelL there* are manv iLh^ 
tioos we bad to If75 were anrth of ISare theory, the group behind the muti- ibOiUes: ooe b that the me*rdi?Trt ? 
* • IN : - ■ . _ • 



to soensbts, the pptentiat fur aophrukaied " 
development against ispedlie targets. . * 
■ Or* question epincs tojmcdi^eJy ;; . 
•tod: Why; hsteaHMof our Kg search ' 
donl the mutilators jua rent a rarcb: 
•omewheie nnd btqr a herd of cm& 
and atet chopping? One theory, as sur. 
ffed by. a Colorado wewip^per edtv* 
•wwl Dane Edwai^b. b that the kv 
tti^rimem at diffiSrctc « 
* #f the 



' w cryinx to'tlck** off tbeU own back* m 

i T f Ancftec question b: Since Wcf '. 
! »5 %Y ' • michcr* are among the nx»t paf rkxic o! 
■ •* £ American** *by w Jtnt band them 
I * ; % cbccki and tell them ilui the CIA wants 
j > t couple of their wufc—**iten*i aec* 
T J * rity, you know— *nd to pk*e leave the 
i \ ja* unlocked ari to keep quiet about b7 
7 /. ; Dawn in N-tf* Vhu, NcwMesko, for 
i * i;1h>urbct, Kithy Caoimack operates a 
5 t tJivb ifeh bef hiabafld to m area that 
$ f * baa Wen harJ-hU wilh mutes and copiers 
j f" and m UFGa. Mn. Cemmack bet 
J fevestfcated the mutet for a local ocwv 
A f ! '* lW**- to spfie of the weifdnesi and tar* 
&V ; t ; toe, ibe mot* *lf thb b Government 
?4« * riT- * aJEory nuneuvtn/Uwn It b time people 
f ft* *ftfe Infornpd. To say that there art eiper- 
V ot i«waicfc.-ift.prieAi that «tt; 

i i t 4 classified would tet many minds 'at ease. 
* tV - And. at the same time, Americam could 
be pleased, prwd end appreciate of 
the e>Jcavc*. We, the people, arc called 
on 10 provitft tax ononcy aod to provide 
yooat men to light in win Surely «* 
" ^ cm - be tn*od aefbc ke^tajarme^ aba* . 

*Oajt that aff« us* 
H «/• Appatently hol First of all the ectiv- 
i ■ . hfet of a mue jroup of cbopopith* who' 
-■"V My 1 fiwteidil^Ofdcr.mdd well he- 
-K cocoa a tm tkction-ytit campaign bsue 
<•? .in a ."country when millions distrust the 
• I* Gov e rn m ent otter years of Watcrpte. 
I J . £IA revelation corruption, cr mtfiu mtm. 

; * Secondly," tbtre 4a a food chance that 
1^ Joe* o(*V* ta^artfjfcrv .whatever U»> 4 
:* ' -CTtdcotuVa-r Insane. They may bave T 
•f .eon* of the highest security cfeafaoees 
V* . ofafatnabte bnd impeccable itpuut!o|ii b * 

toonnws Iihln^ these bovine turfebn*: 
; Jose ttyini for ait You look at photos of.. 
• theae amooA W-pcrfea - AopHifr-paj r - 
w' aew— neat ctrdei, occasionally aportiop * 
<T a aaw-iooOied odse, etc— ood you 



It 

it 



1 



.7* 4er tt they •rn»*t»aivint tujrfodje* mom 



IJ"* iculpiwe oevxanC CootkJcr, fcc 
t! - tunc*, the tPHHtk-dd alf kilkd sear 
f t J ^fterifli| i 'Cotertdo,fc«ftrty Ktttfa 1976. 
'-j -..k Mt mall cbou^i lor the muiks to 
f W t*»y, tftt >ody, (faiy th* b»d wpi 
. KTt bebuxj. tlaey cut off U* btefc pan of 
-,. «k teecuc aad then idiwiud the tip 
tat» (be aVk weufli. «Am h w» hter 
fouuJ by ibc kjeky pawn «Ao had to 



P 



yoke wuhlo* ^ 



J ' It w« (he MMBtf mS Wl of 1^75 
! *ci luUy rrmkJ ** tnemow mfc 

K . ftcMTtn 5ej«mbcf aod Deeanbcr, *» 
mewmbrsbh 1) Kates and then 
w« urr« i* dcKta e< crx»ik» iKfow^v 
«ut lae hol iiuc toMC o* i.- 
Mi coficn aad UFO ttpMta. The** 



ft: 

*t 



.ex 



THE MvTlLAHON MYSTERY to Mflfttf, fl man' Wnt iWvfof A& /«p fif about SSO'AM.Whtn, he 
claims, 15 masked pcoA wood across the highway with tocke yms and tried to Hap hh «ar. 0l ' 



■4 
■» » 

u 



V! 



ww few footprints. No ora w»s caught 
^herc wa i particularly Interesting 
n*e in ApJthe County, Arizona, where 
'mutiteted tmnttU were found to have 
mvitcrioua eoTLbaU-iiied burm. I catted 
sheriff Art fee and askeS him about thif 
Import. ~Ihrrc *e« thuc H * them that 
had the burn* on the inside of ihe righi 
hindqiufler. about halfway up the ham,* 
he said. *The livestock Investigator out of 
v Phoenix wrote i letter to the local news- 
paper here,- Lee' (old roc, "and said that 

vn£ iff iii pfvda«Off*i3¥*je £ C*i€i**» 

1 answered him and I wasn't very nice 

*z* , p» 



proper UFO appearance, there was a 
bunch of ^n>xcrioua yetkrw cfofcC 
about two fort fa oiameter, thai were 
located from ten to WO yard* bom 
thermite the* 

In Idaho that' September* ■ forest- 
i?Tvir? tnwtaycc tnottcd several persons 
■i nuoueu dkw* rum mumiwwn ^ v*« 
Greek fa Bbinc County; the Ocxl day. 



walked along* a fence for about a ha'f 
mile to the roaf, where presumably they 

were picked lip* Peep f"OSSv JnembcTi 

•earthed the entire area, but found no 
further clue*. - t**^*- > 

II was itrkdy by dunce that He Jet:* 
happened lo.be in the rktuty Ihe fcffo*- 



Hi* 



drove by and 



tf _ 



tevtral dead cattle wen found, but the . HedeEus told me. He went to the 

an tolerate where the heifer by and perfumed a 



hikers— despite 
jaevch— were "a** 1 



Then, 



, fa 6eld autopsy; he then prepared a /cpan 



ore not predator-ravaged carcasses.*' 
i'.In Montana, the mutilations began 



sheriff. Reading the Heddiut report, oat 
that the vtuet thing* had bet* 



the number of carcasses found was clow 
,So 100. They were definitely human 
; Auie4' jjccqW.inf toC^in Wottcdon, 
of Cascade County. Wolvenon has stud- 
1*4 the fnuffUtioni jaatiDnHide {as men* 
r - Uomd eartkr» he went to .Marfan Federal 
; #ertitrtilidfy 4o five* a-yo)ytrapr\ l&ant- 

* fetation to A. Kenneth Bpnkston), and he 
told m about a mutilation case that 

* .Occurred % t «aHy tt7J^ in »hich the 
/Onirnal had been onililatcd with an in- 

- eaharaent that eiwes a uu-tootKed cul 
,>*te tfcauptff b/pinViW $**n. Solver- 
ion also had a case tftvo)vin| bums. *W 
a have one tab report that came to on a 



was driving his jctp along S. >5 at 
tkSwMtr j^trj a-w, when, he datms. 15 
nuileJ people tiooj a£ro»s tne rugn^jy 
with .locieJ arms and tried to atop his 

ur- the nun gni £wav. Klb thf tplrh af 
terror did sol The Ttton FWfey AV^ 
of Dri{*v ldaho« for Insunce, mponded 
_ by printini this warning last H aUo*een; 
'-PerAii^caSrte aut^you'UloVMm 
,your chiWren are at sight and. especially 
•Halloween night. On Hiillowecn bight, 

iwiih xhe happenings in. our qwn area, k 4c 4utop^y t it was apparent that 'die £j- 
h wWki be odvttiWe to fevf fe^ftoK-Vto^fc 

chiWren h&me before dark and the ofcter, an area about the size of « h^ejult - 

ones home immediate^ after the fotMbaQ ••That night, after the autopsy. Hedeir^' 
"^me scheduled" on ^that nighL"* * bf^hioo that s^rr^oof h*d infttttU a ic^iT. 
> Idaho %as fHfJ^hlt. TrW mutes were /or a disease info She heifer was hr**»i;-^ 

iru duso^ered in June ^ She wtj:'d* friiUEi Cis 3V; >nt MeiUia 
V^«T*«rtt'*rer*lt» by ih^tmW*aX**jaaw4 -<.Ns^^^ -W^fr 

weaiher arrhed m the ML Police <used * aaketf the foUo^mg «tyetddo;^AM fc - 



miuing; the tdtrus had been ex iz 
two and was lying on the around jwx* u 
|hc three-fnomh-otd fetus; which hadfVer 
eemoved; the tip of the heifer's 
abo removed, fuel an average mic 
**h*t ttuifdjhe,*fKi^ deatfLp^ft?; 
iKiferT "It wat h disease of the Cfcosniij. 
family* Hedelius loU me. *When I c.i 



. toth. Wgok the iul^is bhdt mk( -fe-.*mhodt 
V«W.dwt tte edge* of tbe,lipl had been 
aerrated and frurned.* * , t * 
TW mitci Hgafr fci Hew bfetko fa 
.'Auftutind laitedunlil arOgr^Thanksftlv- 
4 fag; thOr" euneS op again to *4riy If 76/ 
^ In October and Novernber, there were 

* mblhatma in |febntka;id Missouri the 
- mutts began in early October and con- 
' finued in ee*¥ra! cotoiAet into December 

'J97J; These wese about- ten c*vn te- 
poqed in Harney'Count>\ Oregon, at iht 
^tnd.of'the awomcrvie tbe'ftgion that 
, Borden Nevada Ln the touthwc&rn pan* 
of 'the Mate* There were a number of 
mutes fa Wisconsin in October 197 J, one 
of which Involved animals belo n ging so 
fttchard Boom, of Eastman. "Boom 
K Ainl* that the cattle**, were killed with 
* * fas grenad^ TAr UtlwuUr iooW; 
ftponad on October 12th. , 
"in Wyoming* beginning fa September^ 

• there wet thai ladtous mi& o( hdicofHcn, 
*VF<h and a lot of mutilaud cattle; there 
- pas one modem in Wert on County on 

October 6th, wtare m ISO-pound Here- 
ford cerw its «amd up and an nreo in* 
aide hi left-rear tank apparently shaved 
hen, to pW Ihe ak 



V^^ te ;_%t 

— — 




r ,.Aa Cirjtf.* have 4 beeh able to deitr- fafected animal Hoiever. fa -ttk ^* 
; mine; the onty Ol"* ; Government 6lhd^ v -E W^ *JJrrVV ^^-^^ 

^atatf puHidy that a mutittitd anirnal ^aay k «Mpin^viotodr/ar^t I beScvt ^l: 
had been injected wiib * toxin or bacteria r|« b^aeria were mtoed talo (h* heir * 
vat Dr, Robert 'Heddltos,. a veterinary .|a one of severat subsequent conxtrw 
medial officer for the V- S. Department tfdbt whh HtfeW I 'asked tt% *r r ji 
* of Airicuhure, who works In Utah. Dr/ Ihe wamings'be repdrtedjy had*rtr? , ^ 
Hedelii^i n one of a group of about ISO from higher officials after his TV it-jj 
4 fcijhty trained tadiWJuats who acme aa * *iew. ^niOaByr be oaU, 1 talked 
foragn^md-ilHcaae ^diagnosti- ^itponers; but aftcrwul >tu tet ! 
dans " doctors who play w major-part in 
fcceoinE forei^n-aniinal dheases out of the 
United' States. Heddku* mutilation cue* 
involved a pregnant heifer that was dfc- 
novnred hat before dawn on t en t em b er 
J0 # 1975* two miles outside of Emery, 
>:LHarvfa tf» pdddie.ff the Law^ 
onfortemerd offictah auspectad that die 
mutitaton had been disturhed in their 
work Md had had so apltt precipitously 
.before they were through. 'According to 
a npprt prepared by the Emery County 
JfamTs office, two -prafessionil lack* 
an* analyaed the dry pasture grass at 
tK- mi* and determined that twr* ocrsons 
had left the acene *nJ that they had 



by ecatc pd ft±\ 
people. I waa laid that I was not t? n . 
io any o( the news madia." 1 then sC* 
him about a . campaign auppt**:- 
launched lo «scredn fam. *U p dt. ^ 
0 week after this (interview} kin*?** 
of Utah fifi^- 



dim wis a ml effort .made so dUct^ : 
over/thing. He told it was die ***r* 
predion and that the nwuw-lnowU-. 
^gative. The mice that wtrt rjt 
Iwtih tectecb taken Irc^ 
i ami were wcB«nd hapjn ^ 
*» nptafft Jhis by wring that the 



(i J 

jui>n«vutJttiv.i 4««»i.V^«a a tnttt m m uiihhi «// jmm tU.KJVVtl'nmCHt VCMCles In 

or4cr that local law-enjorcemtnt officials niay. not check or search tlieuu ; yOZSttf" 



• live In ft* open tlr. ThrougH to sloth 
or a deliberate bo<dh~up, Hedelius* tissue 
sample* were c\po« il to oxygen by others 
fa the Jab tod therefore the inoculation 
test* were useless.) 

When I talked to him, Hedctius stood 
'firmly behind his findings. Tm sure 

• fhJt whoever <W this, that the animal 
. with a dirt gun, an J that he used cither 

• culture of the bacteria or a dots of 
a Cbe tc&in proJuccJ by the bacteria." 
."Do* you think," I asled, 1hat uVre's 
' tome sort of research going on?" 

*Yeah, I think so. And jt&t why aft 
•bein| done b the question." 
r&Hcdcttus.rnaoc d£iu} tsiiebt*bbserva> 
-rtom relative lo due else*. For instance",* 
when inked how i-asy it would be to 
, obtain thc*c bacteria or toxins, he re- 
plied: "It's very easy. There are perhaps 
m 'm couple of hundred biological-supply 
bouses in the emmry. . ... They could 



animals as Instant bacteria or ~Jk\ 
farmv. Hctding 5/ liter ah*s wary book oni 
chentscal and biological snuff, ocie en- 
counters something the U. S. developed 
called mortality-enhancing factont 
(known, naturally, ns Mfc'F*); these agenui 
•are added to ordina ry Kolog icah so a» to 
greatly speed op ihc kill time of a di»ca*e 
Perhaps the mutios arc uwng MEFs tc> < 
produce quick dcjih. or a ^JUL ru>h oJ 
production of something they want to 
collect. One researcher, in fact, doa 
claim thai the mutilators have got their 
disease death time down to IS minutes. 



may not died or tcarttfthenUcten is 
the event of • hiaJliway accident If thtr t 
b a wreck/ only Government people 
examine the wreckage. Therefore, sttfeir 
Government or military equipment— tvHl 
way cars or tfueU — can travel in 
secrecy aqy where in the United Sates. 
. Erianne h sfcej* fcal about what wis 
occur when* some mutilator fa actutf- 
caught carving a Hertford in some ur. m 
county. "I think the only person mh: 
can break aoroeihjing like this." Friasac 
tays. Is spovonc with knowledge of t*ie 
affairs of a Jargc urbanization and of hn» 



There afc mUh ttpotU that the gUndi 

that are removed from the animals, as * P*od**t% its pairiicubr type of ojw:^ 

weH fcthetfr^ey****! tfalMk^^ ft* think a deputy eher.?' 

kinds of thirty that buna-fide rc«carchcrs w,lh 1 ril * hl b»ck«rounJ in law eiuVtas 

might take, in order to check the spread mtnt « hlelligcncf h going to be ab s 

of chemical or biological agents. to do it If he catch a guy, or x*: - 

• . • fuyti *e culprit's background^ fa gcteg 7 

how to aaiEAK the case *° ^ covered as fcir as foible! And * • * 

Whoever breaks this case could collect %fc * im b «? !* P»cifci The p**^- 

and :pcopjgaie.ihe «Heajl SM J^*Tdl>^approfii,L Sf , 

. % f^^^.^T.^; Would it ^ ^ ^ ,^Wii^l^ng^e«J a^enkanorl^ei^t" • ^ # -V/l 

by various ^atc caittle aaociaiiom. gov. I mentioned to Erianne. as 1 bad vr 

•rnors. newspapers,, etc. Fm*atc bivesti-' lnvTSunlon, > the odious wevC;- - 

gator Erianne h& ]^tieiuVd %i«t seems: mujics^hat. i^afirver 

to me to he a good approach to cracking bwwable sc*ntiflc ot security creJe> . 

tfiis caK. bateJ on \hh long experienae in m :!>»^Wi-*te * 
die intttfcgencc field: Anal>ae the mutiuv:. be rwponded, fwc ^ fioa\ know w^: ; 

•on" *vu-Un in u.^Krr «o kxiir them. *J *• second or thifd eChcVei aT high Cr-v 

iu»kthe>VtifMJ< ^•uL^aJ5>lrv;*^'' t T w ^*^* V i • ^ l..^ : 

+ p*»4*4t* p»uocfc or rumen iihc Aim ^««y^ u4J sc im «utiU- ^J:^c« • » KaJWig H*-5>- 

. • HomacM U thg heifer he autop^ieJ. He ^ %yUan ^ulon tbif chtora!'l*<rV4 «u^^ 

. apecttbtc^ Uut, for iiume reaaon, the mu- ^ ^ Uc ^ inad.*** * Beat that that scene lends aa.am.ai 

riXatf animab faart ta^i quae rapidly . «c«ci In thit cCt litfthe sk^ateutKir-r^ ^/^.^^^^r^i^ 5 ^^: 



take great cipcrthelio isolate the poisom? 
flot really. "ActwUlly, an>-body who has 

•hid a tavc eeune'iiA batficriblogy xooW 
4o it. tft net that complicated ~ 
- On she other kind. Hedelius itrrued 
the poswKUiy thai ithc whole case vitfu 

. be ilkan it appears to be. 

For bw jner, Acre was a comptrte |a;i 



toV^i quite ripidty' 
after* the) -die, eipetuatly .Ijn 'the hot. run; ., 



eccrtcy.b) this ca*e lio^tKe seefec^ aVtrfd; 
. aay. the U-2.oicrtlighU.The- 0-2 Afchts ™* X****" * the Arm>a.Che«« 
t • but t wjih this animal the first thing that have been uncovered by favcitigai - Corps "are Quoted ai pbcing nerve . 



.bfodting— anJ I wasui^ called. in on this,' 
until the late afternoon. The carcass was 

• ' Just about a* (foh.au it could be/ . 

'nlow^aXkr'Vfeath-dc^gdeceaKrf 
■'%~«inulsxapbloattagr 

•;*5Qh,km about immediately," Hedctius 
•° gaiu^.nSireeiaSy in the case of a Tumi- 
« ©apt ahuiul like a eow t Com alwa>^s 
kaV^ a clruin aiwkinl, bf ♦gi\. / iiJt*%hen 
*l pfvoed this animal up, the intestinal 
track and the rumen were absolutely 

• * empty anJ compiddy devoid of gas. I 

• h*I never seen anything Uke it. Even when 
a cow fa shugbterwl at a packing plant, 

• • * certain aowunt of gas preient 

■ *1mmedlaidr afleriiranl And so I can Only 
conjecture that, with this research, per* 
V bape there's a Bob more to b. Maybe 

• *thc> are; in fact, strutting the rumen, ao 
thai tkaCfjtesamiDt produced." 

\ - It's enough la boggle thf tnind of a 
* * iiK|4«Ho» poet like me/ Perhaps 
♦ . they are uvug the Irving aystcnw ot* Itec 



1 civilian-based juppJIy^nMofitiical com-' 
.panics: e%cn requisition or order forms 
a heU ducj fa to the; nature of the enter- 
prise myolveJ.* In the mutilation case, 
Erianne points oou one could check heH- 
copter-fuct delivery: systems^ and repain 
ordered for supply vehicles; one could 



koowsr Assuming that the wWtc rrsztz 
b not the twk of floppy oucr->r- r: 
•owtry bums, ma>be in lV7p-th^ • 
patrjoa waxed wioeb over Niaon's is* 
and began to figure oot ways to ccr~-t 
their activities. 



Jook tor unimial \ans, perhaps with FjJ- »Whoc\er thejT ate. they're *r£Af % 
, Ml UaK Mod. «W*.mar oppcar to \ grating y^y^ T a^ w ? th. a 

havebrolcn down t-y the side of the road.- of orpnc* «cl*t^r4ucl Cost! ^ 

• Jt turns out than the way that flying ™**e up there m act figures; in l- 

aetvices transport bdicupters-for oil- f* ^ *** cn the c^^ 

field work, for ctampfe— b to carry them * (ct » W^ffll r 5 
bi big vans; thoc rehicfa have a sling* 
ahot 
•o- 

Erianne points l~ 

or a rogue unit **hin b," could easily •«» «N» « h ** v 

anove vans, bcticopderi and supply equip- «roy ttnan. The o*d Greek p^ 



shot is $125 an Ihour. At for sn^r 
rtie muties'atty.ivetl be tfetemua/. 



lot loading ilo ice. etubbne the copteii ***** m^Aww oe ceicr 
r-bc awung In iimf iutVthc vaa> ^kea^«uge rf *tfW«£ 
rianne points out that the Covcnmnt ta ** Eaecuttvc branch ai^thie t 



throughout mutilation country,, 
There h, be reb|et, ascertain type of scJ 
'that b affiveJ so Government vchkks Mr 
orucr mux sue^l iaw<<niuivciuuii 4 »»miilu 



of hubrlr. overweening anJ 
gam and careless |prmk of cimoWu w 
4riO cause Ae biutiei jo mate ja c 
br%-AIag ^:wr. Ti^r - A % * s^ *~ 

.A 



mi l_ . I. .1 M^iJ. ^I MM .'I 

rm wins mvesugaiion qijui WW muiuain 



Linked'tQiWUs 




^■y ■ MkfL to ftttey'tMHuwd 
l'' .«•», iMdatat* u* i 

* /* OUtofVOfll 

? thrir ow* nM'rW Mp Is 

• ^ data, thf, auttltoUpiu 
?** hava-feaon aa tnyatarfaua aa 

- bet* grkriy/' ho aald. 



Juottoa OopartaMot an* 
H • llMffaad Utt FBI offlci In Albu- 
r -wwwla'bacamalavalvadbi 
* jam kaaftttiatlon ol Lbeaa 
V 'orlmai'aftthobaiiiiluitaavaral 
1 \ if tht flWtibUoa UIUQM QO* 
. ^(WnM aa tfritna Luido/ 1 
• * ^vV Haqy *«**■ occurred 
f<4aa TinhMta'rt lha.JkarUia 



tald* f*vrt hava awt pratUlori 
villi aupar poworo* Wa fltod 
p, . tfaqif narraitcn at* bttaa llftad 
local law up (all Urn ground) a*i>laier 
they laava ciamp marki m lha 
!■ afaa vary ■*■■« fwr^sa 

to helluva that a predator can | ' 
tuba lha haari out of nu kulmul F" 5 *- ' 1 
through a tmall wound la tha 



Utt 

4 **Thar# fcova 

or 

kaowa about. 7fca fodtaat *i* 
umaUr (rigMmd U*ath/' bo 
aahl -t^ ■ 

"Thay-doa'i luy'oaytliJag 
about It baoauH (hoy koow Us 



_ ; \ ^— — « - 1 attach* - ariS tit uoiai iba 

Many attar hwattigatora 



u aad UFp ra* 
?^wa«raatl« UPOa 
ite^aMy poooUsta avplana* 

Said Richard Slgiimuad. a 



*WiiM'toKr«.-'il 
lUr ttw miriiTiHwM' * 

BffpdL'j-feil f 



iki MNi «- UK^." ^ : ^ 
ummr Mtaowjt.Sta Iter* 

. /uimhilMprot «• • ftp* V 

NUtv.lwwM; .• r T r >< . v 

"I mi«M h* Ik* lint ***** . 
atlormtr to Um minify lo 

GUwiiimicii ffjijii Oincr 



Or* Hoar/ Moolakh, aa oagl- 
phytlclit at fiaadlo 



Labaralariai which handlaa aa- 
oral tovaramant projotis, ra- 
vaalad that lodiani art aa tar* 
r If tad by tha muittatkma, thay 
bury ibo earcaMat Immaolato* 
ly and ara raluctaat la dtoetiAo 
what happa n od, Evan tholrdoff 
lataaatofanaarthoearoaaaoi. | 
Or, IfftMaUb, wh» hao batat 
la^laattoi tha ftta«M Kwf Hl 




- , — ■.■«| l >kHi |imu 

estiniiiutl (-2H nullum *uuure nuiu urea otrtAchino from TeniujuuM tn nr«« 



mutilations begun uround 1870, The 141 million oqi 
total lend eree In the jpOttr> '* 
tjpeniej United luiet. ; 



a&-lttdKf 




tfr t *thaf f*ft t of hntM activity 

l^ .ewl^ntteM- 
l>*. eerooeeoi. •• * • ♦ 
rv vTi piOy thf Meed mi eeitole,.^ 










as 


**** - ^'V- 





"etfeetod jne^-,iJ*e« 



^•endm 

♦C- - e)2ae^^e4 'eiweteTV 

ion. tdiw^Wi re bo lonl ■ If p r e dt efrew IneebeeV he 
\; fHO. la eaotofyW-JUtw/ti e*i< "we b*vo D*«Ut*ri 

i . t, .Ueivemty- ene wee • meame J «lth ' ouper pewen. r We DM 
i>\ef the.- Anon* IT iitoen4ieo#ng thfee 

f f • SSwe^wneWdlele bjlve * 

i '*•»•. the mutilation* 

• V hewe boon m myetertoue 
>. • 4b»y>o boon irtoly.*' bo aeji 



.^-fbtJutgcc DeMrtnMMt«u. 
k-f thertoed thi FBI offloo InJtlbu. 
f.a query* trnecome Jnogfvod In 



i ."oriiMteeibabMui th«i Mvoral 

\fa v# occurred 

*nlm*U m the JicartUa 
Dtilce, 

* V f, Any irtaee we'vr had * 
. „ mutifciUufw we have mIao had 
, UFO tighiing*," reported Gube 



fag the umiJ ) 



I lifted 



beta* 

>!fto*Ipt*r 
the* We damp mark* ao the 
top, U It eieo very hard fbr yap' 
to believe that a predator oaa 
lake the honnaut eC aa animal 
tWgy a om^woiMdla the 

Dr. Uatvy Motfaith, ao ea*|: 
wring l»taB***l fiudb 
i bee i to rt at whleh haadJae ae- 
or^at a <>ven*/Mnt prajocu, re- 
vaatod that ladtaiu are ao tar- 
rifled by the mutittitionf. they 
miry the earepteee Immedbifta- 
ty and are reluctant to diacufce 
what happened. Evan their doge 
rafuee to go near the carcaaeee. 

Dr. MonteiUi. who haa been 
inveetlgatbig the attacka since 
they beges), eatd Indiana have 
told him of actually aeelng 
aaaceehipa land and untpad 
,f atar people*' who chaac down 



*;■♦*> n<y 4di< 

gieepa^oiarT &£7h\ 
*flm* mm ' 




H^HMM'aaM twr IumTm 

4hM allnWH tf^nW g& Hno% m 

>T_ ^■iri7 r Lo!Tii n *L£liiVtfW 
afw^^vppnfpofa^v* iam *mm 

JjBSMtSL 

o^n^penjnjn/ fotfj^onsn^^pp vnvJ^n^n^ojo^> v^Pr 

M. • . \ v:.' • ' 

"Thn-doe't ■«/ onytbini , 
•bout It faeuMiM Oiejr booor WtL bold .JUekurd Jlf UmuoA • 
Woe dflno hy/fUr pooplu.' thay | Bo ubJer, Onto.. 




HUr biwv* ofno tndt UfOn \ Ao^nolngilrai 

.moburd " iJ r : - - ^ TJSgf 

per. One., m 

Mataa 



..•WoVMfo 





■ « . • » . 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
ENCLOSURE COVER SHEET 

SUBJECT ; ft&TTLE 
FILE: 

SECTION / OF / 



THIS SECTION IS COMPRISED OF PAGES 
WHICH WERE REVIEWED FOR THIS RELEASE. 



FOR RELEASE. 



PAGES ARE AVAILABLE FROM THIS SECTION 



THIS IS ENCLOSURE OF ENCLOSURE(S) 



NO DUPLICATION FEE 
FOR THIS PAGE 



Alrtel 



To : SAC ,/Albuquerque 

Vrony^ Director, FBI 

THE nKUTi: ryiONS _g g 
/ 16 ANIMALS }' 

H cur — 

M50:, Albuquerque 




3/12/79 



1 - J. E. Smith 



Re Bureau ftlrtel to Albuquerque, 3/6/79. 

Enclosed for the Albuquerque Division Is a' package 
containing numerous documents from the Department of Justice 
concerning captioned matter* It is forwarded for the 
information of the Albuquerque Division. 

Enclosure 



UJ 



CO 



CD 



Atttt. Dfr 

Dee. AD A*. 

Dee. AD In. H 

Aiit. &f.i 

Crfau Uv 



letelL. 



LvqsJ Ceee> _ 
Plan. £ tn*p. . 
Kec, Meat* _ 
Teca. Sem, _ 
Trelehf _ 



fttUU Atf». Off 



Tel***** a R« 




9 MAR 13 1379 



(" 



January 10, 1979 



Honorable Harrison II* Schnjitt 
United States Senate 

12S1 DSOC 

Washington, D.C, 2^010 

\ 

Dear Senator Sch:nitt: 

As I told you over the telephone yesterday, I 
have asked Philip Ileymann, head of the Criminal Division, 
to loo--: into our" jurisdiction over the cattle mutilation 
problen with which you are concerned. Ug v*ill be in 
touch with you at an early date. 

I nust say that the materials sent no indica;** tho 
existence of one of ths strangest phenorr.enons in ray 
r.c-nory. 

v:am regards. 

Sincerely, 



Griffin B. Bell 



bec: w/materials to Terry Adamson 

Ray Calamaro 
^/Phil Heyjnann 



- Please have someone loolc into 
this matter at an early date. 
Sen. Schmitt is our frc^nd and 
there have been about 60 
mutilations in New Mexico in 
recent months. Gr&ftBB 



HARniSOti SCHMITT 
' NEWVEXICO 

* CO-VMITTCE ON COMMERCE. 
SCIENCE. AND TRANSPORTATION 

CCMMtTTCCON BANKING. 
HOUi'NC, AND URBAN AFFAIRS 

SEkECT COMMiTTEE ON ETHICS 



O 



QiCnsieft £>{ct{c<z Jz>crxalc 

WASHINGTON. D.C 20510 



December 21, 1978 



The Honorable Griffin B. Bell 

Attorney General 

Department of Justice 

10th and Constitution Avenue, K.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20530 

Dear Mr* Attorney General: 



RECEIVED 



• i 



G£'A. 



c 



CO 



During the past several years, ranchers throughout the West 
including my home state of Kew Mexico, have been victimized 
by a series of cattle mutilations. As a result, these ranchers 
have as a group and individually suffered serious economic 
losses. 

These mysterious killings have been the subject of at least 
two articles in national publications, copies of which are 
enclosed. Mr, Cockburn's article in the December 1975 issue 
of Ssguire states that there had been a federal investigation 
into this matter, but it was dropped, to. Cockburn implies 
the investigation may have been terminated because cattle 
mutilation per se is not a federal offense. 

VThile an individual cattle mutilation may not be a federal 
offense, I am very concerned at what appears to be a continued 
pattern of an organized interstate criminal activity. Therefore, 
I am requesting that the Justice Department re-examine its 
jurisdiction in this area with respect to the possible reopening 
of this investigation. 

Enclosed are copies of my files on this subject. While awaiting 
what will hopefully be a favorable reply, 1 shall continue to 
gather materials that could be of help in such an investigation. 
If you need further information in studying this matter, please 
do not hesitate to contact me. 



Sincereiyi 




Harrison Schmitt 



HS: jri 

Enclosures I f 



23; dec 23 19 



KA0. 



CHIMlN'AL-GliNV 



0 



NEW MEXICO STATE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



INTER-DEPARTMENTAL CORRESPONDENCE 



subject CORRESPONDENCE - SENATOR SCHMITT 
(LIVESTOCK MUTILATIONS) 



date JULY 18, 1971 



FROM 



TO 



ATTENTION or ^ 

MAJOR M. S.- CHAVg^ 

w 
e 



MARTIN E. VIGIL, DIRECTOR 

CAPTAIN CHARLIE P. AN AY A 
New Mexico State Police . 
Espanola, New Mexico-' 

Dear Captain: 

We are in receipt of correspondence from the Honorable 1 " 
Harrison Schmitt, State Senator, and Mr. Manuel S. Go'niea, 
Dulco, New Mexico regarding livestock mutilations in 
Rio Arriba County for the past two years. 

Kindly instruct Officer Gabe Valdez to submit copies of 
all his reports concerning this matter to this office, 
in order that we may "forward them to Senator Schmitt 's 
office. 

Very truly yours, 

MARTIN E. VIGIL, DIRECTOR 



BY: 



W. J. AOLLOCK, CHIEF 
Uniformed Bureau 
State Police Division 
Criminal Justice Department 

ccs File 



The Honorable Harrison Schmitt, State Senator 



MEV/WJB/cl 
ATTACHMENTS ; 



ENCLOSURE FOR LETTER ^TED AUGUST 16, 1978, TO m. MANUEL ■ S . I 



GOMEZ 



V 




TO: 



Siittrb &tatcs Brpartrornt of Justitt 

ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL 



January 3, 1978 



Criminal Division 



On December 29 # 1978, John Ryan, 
Schmitt's administrative assistant, 
called OLA regarding the status of 
this matter. OLA only received this 
correspondence yesterday but we have 
learned that the Senator has personally 
discussed this matter with the Attorney 
General. The AG agreed to have someone 
in the Criminal Division look into this 
matter to determine whether or not 
*here is any statutory basis for 
federal intervention. 



V 




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s so often happens wtth 
crime, it's a question of 
viewpoint, really. Given 
the rate of human slaugh- 
ter in any large American 
city, it might not seem too important 
that between April and September of 
this year 129 cattle were mutilated in 
the state of Colorado. As a matter of 
fact, in 1974, there were about 3,750.- 
000 cattle grazing in Colorado and 
around 37,000 of these died of natu- 
ral causes, so we are not talking 
about an event of prime importance 
to the ranching business. 

But no rancher in Colorado is tak- 
ing this comfortable view of the mat- 
ter. What the ranchers dislike is the 
idea of driving across their pastures ~ 
and finding, as one did last August, 
a dead bull with its penis, rectum, 
testicles, tongue and an eye excised 
with surgical deftness and absolutely 
no trace visible of the surgeon or 
surgeons involved. 

Over the past couple of years, hun- 
dreds of such mutilation.' have oc- 
curred in Colorado, Minnesota, Ne- 
braska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, 
South Dakota, Montana, New Mexico 
and Texas. In fact, if you follow this 
kind of thing, you may have noticed 
the odd item in the newspapers about 
the cattle-cutting craze. I'd seen such 
items myself but not taken too much 
of an interest till my good friend Ed 
Sanders told me last fall that some 
anonymous person in Sacramento 
had sent him a cow's tongue in the 
mail. Now, Sanders is the author of 
The Family, a fine and eerie book 
about the Manson group. Like my- 
self, he had taken only a passing in- 
terest in cattle mutilations. The ar- 
rival in June of what he likes to call 
the lingua bovina ezcisa, packed in a 
shoe box, at the office of his literary 
agent escalated his attention remark- 
ably. In June, you may remember, 
Sacramento was rendered the more 
colorful by two young Mansonian 
ladies called Squeaky Fromme and 
Sandra Good strolling about in their 
red robes. 

Back in 1970, when Sanders was 
compiling material about the Manson 
group, ritual murders, and other di- 
verting practices in California, he'd 
examined the case of a ritual de- 



capitation of a goat in Topanga Can- 
yon. Five years later the question 
seemed to be whether excised animal 
parts had, so to speak, become part 
of the currency of satanic groups; 
whether a sliced cow's tongue was 
now an essential part of the ritual- 
ist's working equipment 

So far, after some investigation, 
Sanders has found nothing to con- 
nect the tongue from Sacramento 
with the mutilations in the Midwest 
But he did, in the course of a drive 
across the country, find himself stand- 
ing in the office of the sheriff of 
Elbert County, Colorado, looking at a 
Polaroid photograph. It showed a 
cow with its udder bag and rectum 
removed. The cow had been pregnant 
and the photograph also showed a 




long, thin, unborn calfs neck and 
head, which the mutilators had cut 
and pulled out of its mother's uterus. 
The calf's tongue had been cut out 
As Sanders later remarked to me, he 
could understand why the ranchers 
were getting upset 

The mutilation case histories make 
for depressing reading. In Minne- 
sota, in the fall of 1974, a young cow 
was found dead with its sexual or- 
gans, one ear and the udder removed. 
The incision to remove the udder was 
made in the form of a diamond. The 
previous spring, the mutilation mob 
had turned up in Nebraska. Among 
its victims, a calf with its sex or- 
gans removed and its body drained of 
blood. On we go to Oklahoma to find 
reports of a Hereford cow killed by 
strangulation or a Wow on the n*** 



.and with the tip of its nose, its 
tongue, left ear, udder and vagina all 
removed with a knife. And on and 
on, from Texas to Colorado to Mon- 
tana. Behind them the mutilators al- 
ways leave county sheriffs and vet- 
erinarians saying they have never 
seen anything like it before, and local 
authorities on black ritual discours- 
ing on the importance of always 
using fresh warm blood, if drinking 
the stuff is called for, 

A survey of newsciips and other 
literature on cattle mutilation seems 
to indicate that the whole business 
started with the mysterious death of 
Snippy. Snippy was a. horse whose 
mutilated body was found on a ranch 
near Alamosa, Colorado, eight years . . 
ago. Snippy's throat had been cut and 
flesh from the head and neck re- 
moved. Also removed were Snippy's 
brain and stomach. Snippy's owner 
was convinced that his horse had 
been "zapped by a flying saucer." 
Snippy's bones may still be viewed in 
the museum at Adams State College 
in Alamosa. 

U.F.O/s are still being blamed for 
the cattle mutilations. Some students 
of the craze simply see no other ex* 
plantation. Carl Whiteside, of the 
Colorado Bureau of Investigation, 
evidently felt it necessary to contest 
this hypothesis, since he told me seri- 
ously, "We do not feel these people 
have any magical quality that puts 
them in the realm of the supernatural 
or some alien planet civilization/' 

The occupants of U.F,0/s have not 
so far appeared to refute slanderous 
allegations about their attitude 
toward terrestrial livestock. People 
associated with occult groups, on the 
other hand, have been vehemently 
trying to distance themselves from 
the unknown slicers. Back at the 
start of the year, after twenty-three 
mutilations in Texas, a self-professed 
witch in Dallas told a local reporter 
she thought they were the work of 
**a satanist group from Fort Worth." 
These Texas cattle had been drained 
of their blood, which the witch 
thought was consonant with satanic 
addiction to blood. "They give. witch* 
craft a bad name," she added. 

A writer in Gnostica was even 
more alarmed* "Despite the obvious 
illogicality of it," said Isaac Bone* 
wits, a former member of the Church 
of Satan, "the favorite theory right , 
now among state and federal investi- 
gators is that occultists of some sort 
are involved. This of course is sheer 
scapegoating, since only a rank ama- 
teur would believe it possible to get 
usable psychic energy out of such 
mutilations, and a rank amateur ' 
would not be able to (a) levitate so 



without leaving evidence of a pump- 
ing machine, (c) make the neat 'sur- 
gical' inciaions that were used to re- 
move organs and extremities, or (d) 
teleport so as to be able to perform 
two such operations on the same 
night, hundreds of miles apart" 

It would be interesting to know 
what Bonewits would consider the 
talents of a professional; but he was 
right in thinking that at one point 
federal and state investigators did 
think that occultists were involved* 
For a time, indeed, they thought a 
solution to the great mutilation wave " 
was at hand. 

Early in 1974, a student at Kilgore 
Junior College in Texas wrote a 
paper on "The Sons of Satan, M which 
contained detailed descriptions of 
how this group would mutilate cattle 
between midnight and sunrise- The 
ritual would be completed just as 
sunlight started to filter down on the 
animal through the branches of a 1 
tree, (In the absence of trees, the 
adepts would hold a branch over the 
beast and proceed as usual with this 
substitute.) 

The teacher at Kilgore Junior Col-" 
lege was sufficiently revolted by the 
theme's details to destroy it forth* 
with. The student said he had heard 
the story from a friend familiar with 
the satanists. An English professor 
from Pennsylvania told John Makeig 
of the Fort Worth Star~TcU$ram 
that he was familiar with the Sons 
of Satan group, had some of its mem- 
bers in his class, and had seen "some 
girls who'd cut off their fingers and 
pieces of their ears and things like 
that" Their "primary thrill/' he 
added, was to eat their own flesh. 

Ali this information was passed on 
to Don Flickinger, an Alcohol, To- 
bacco and Firearms agent in Minne- 
apolis. Early this year Flickinger be- 
came the main federal investigator 
of the mutilation phenomenon, for 
somewhat bizarre reasons. Cattle 



mutilation is not, as a spokesman in 
the Justice Department stiffly in- 
formed me, a federal offense. Flick- 
inger became involved because three 
prisoners in federal institutions sud- 
denly wrote to various authorities 
announcing that not only did they 
know the satanic cult practicing the 
mutilations, but that this same group 
had compiled a "death list" of in- 
tended assassination victims* Among 
the alleged targets were Senator Hu- 
bert Humphrey and a federal judge 
in Minneapolis. \ 
~ The U.S. attorney in Minneapolis, 
Robert Renner, put A*T*F/a Flick- 
inger on the case because, as he put 
it to me, "We thought it was the only 
agency freewheeling enough realty to 
do something" The informants con- 
tinued to pour out their stories: a 
small city near the Gulf Coast would 
have its water deliberately poisoned; 
two people in another Texas town 
would suffer dismemberment in the 
near future. Just enough of the in- 
formants* stories checked out to cause 
Flickinger and investigators in sev- 
eral states to continue the hunt for 
the allegedly four-hundrcd-strong 
band of rich cattle-mutilating satan- 
ists. Reputed leaders of the group in 
Texas were polygraphed. All survived 
such examinations. One of the claims 
was that the group was escalating 
from animal to human mutilations 
and police earnestly scanned all cases 
of ritualistic murders that occurred. 
Flickinger himself was threatened 
and his door daubed with blood. 

Sometime in the summer of this 
year the federal investigation came 
to an abrupt end. All that a person 
in the Justice Department associated 
with the case would teii me was, "We 
were looking into alleged threats to 
elected officials from the same type 
of people involved in cattle mutila- 
tions and we were unable to come up 
with anything at all" This was not 
particularly illuminating, but John 



WIDOW PRICE 

Oscar Price died with a hunk of steak in his throat, 

dining among friends at Top af 2J, a restaurant \ 

for people on top of it alL His friends thought 

him laughing, then mildly miffed, red-faced 

at his wife* who jolted her potato and missed his going* 

Where she lives now (on Ipp of a hiU) % 
she wonders about choking. This is on days 
when racks shift place and daisies are spineless 
with west wind at their backs. She watches birds, 
how flycatchers take food and are gone* 
ft is frightening: alt this shifting and bending 
and flying. The thing about choking* too. 
She nthse* Oscnr, she sijs* 



Makeig at the Fort Worth Star-Tele- 
gram had also been receiving letters 
from two of the informants— con* 
victed armed robbers in the Marion 
federal prison — and was able to con- 
clude that the federal investigators 
had become convinced that the in- 
formants were putting out a lot of. 
bogus information in an attempt to 
get moved to prisons from which it 
would be easier for them to escape. 
This view was strengthened by the 
fact that all three informants had in- 
deed made escape attempts. 

Thus ended federal involvement in 
the investigation of cattle mutila- 
tions and thus also ended the last 
convincing series of leads anyone ha$ 
yet come up with. * 

What are we left with? In the hun- 
dreds of cases of cattle mutilations, 
no one has ever been seen at or near 
the scene of the crime. No trace of 
the perpetrators — footprints, car 
tracks or even evidence of the use of 
helicopters — has ever been detected. 
Many ranchers believe that heli- 
copters have been used, partly be- 
cause a large number of sightings of 
unidentified helicopters have been re- 
ported, partly because it seems this 
is the only form of transport allow- 
ing easy access to remote rangeland. 
Some investigators believe that such 
furtive use of helicopters would ex- 



Q 



plain the large number of U.F.O. 
sightings in the affected states. 

Cynics say that small predators 
are responsible for many of the al- 
leged mutilations. This may some- 
times be the case, but Carl White- 
aide, the Colorado Bureau of Investi- 
gation officer, told me that out of all 
the dead animals sent to the veteri- 
nary school at Colorado State Uni- 
versity six were fresh enough to be 
amenable to autopsy. One had been 
the victim of a predator, five had 
definitely been mutilated by humans. 
In all cases, he added, the animals 
had died of natural causes and the 
mutilations had occurred post-mor- 
tem, which he said produced curious 
questions: 41 Are the cattle being 
killed and mutilated by the same peo- 
ple, or do the mutilators come upon 
them and do the cutting?" 

Out of all the investigations only 
one clue has emerged. In the late 
summer a Colorado rancher found a 
blue plastic valise on his land. In it 
were a cow's tongue, an ear and a 
scalpel. 

The day I spoke wUh Whiteside he 
had just returned from a meeting of 
three hundred ranchers in Kiowa. 
Elbert County. Elbert County suf- 
fered sixty-three cases of mutilation 
over the summer. Whiteside said the 
ranchers "were literally up in 



arms The thing that' 

and frightening to them is 
body can get onto their n 
actually cut up an animal 
no trace. What we're afraid 
we are going to have a ho 
our hands, A person runs e 
wanders onto a ranch and 
thing you know these peopl 
spooked become involved i 
der/* 

So be careful about road a' 
time you drive around the J 
states. Ed Sanders, who is a 
an, told me that one of the 1 
driving around mutilation 
was seeing trucks trundling 
to orthodox slaughter. Yo*j 
steak for a lifetime and ttiL 
tated over the fate of on< 
* whose organs have been aliw 
unknown cow molesters. It'i 
ironic tension between homi 
tistics versus humdrum deat 
roads. As I said at the stai 
Question of viewpoint. Crim 
what you care to see. 
- And how to solve the ca 
jolly A S T,F. official told me 
swer is "to get two guys dr 
as a bull with specially large 
etand them on the range ar 
It could work, I suppose, bul 
see that the investigators ar 
desperate* 



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em adopted a wait^^j-sec 
attitude. And sonic of tin* Stateside fugi- 
tives had j;rnwn downright paranoid af- 
ter years on the lam. "I low do I know 
they won't lock me up and put mc back 
in the A nay?" asked a diehard deserter 
in New York. 

When the Clemency Board— headed 
by an outspoken critic of the war, for- 
mer New York Sen. Charles Coodcll— 
logins its work, some of ilie resistcrs* 
fears may be cased. Coodclls dovish 
views will be bolstered by those of other 
board members, including National Ur- 
ban League director Vemon E. Jordan 
and the He v. Theodore Hcsburgb, pres- 
ident of Notre Dame and a former head 
of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. 

lnc panelists clearly have 
some very difficult problems 
ahead- weighing, for example, 
time served in jail against time 
owed 'for alternate service, or 
battle honors against time spent 
AWOL. And the board con- 
tained some hawkish members 
who might oppose leniency, in* 
eluding retired Marine Corps. 
Gen. Lewis Walt and James 
Mayo, executive director of 
Paralyzed Veterans of America. 
Still, the Ford plan had the vir- 
tue of all compromises. Said 
lieshurgh: "As long as Nixon 
was in, these guys could rot as 
far as he was concerned. Its 
the difference between no 
chance and some chance." 

INDIANS: 

Glazing Saddles 

It didn't look like much of a 
hnrdcr crossing. The sign by the 
side of the road merely de- 
included a 10-cent toll from pass* 
ing motorists, most of whom 
didn't even stop. But the mu- 
tant Kootenai Indians manning 
the roadside picket lines outside 
lion tiers Ferry, Idaho, weren't 
kidding. After years of frustra- 
tion trying to deal with Washington, the 
67 metuliers of the Kootenai tribe finally 
lost patience last week and declared war 
on the United States— by registered mail. 

Their challenge was delivered in a 
letter to President Ford demanding a 
l£8,000«aere reservation, plus os much 
as $3.2 million for tribal land the govern- 
ment had paid for in 1962 at the rate of 
3(i cents an acre. To back it up, they 
threatened to tax white homeowners 
and businesses squatting on their ancient 
tribal lauds. Idaho's Gov. Cecil Andrus 
scut in 00 lawmen to keep the highways 
clear, but tensions soon eased. The Bu- 
rem of Indian Affairs invited tribal lead- 
ers to l>egin negotiations, and the citi- 
zens of Uonncrs Ferry relaxed. *Thc 
Indians have told us that they don't want 
a war," said one sympathetic local. They 
know it's tough for 07 people to get a re- 
action from Washington, D.C " 

32 



MYSTERIES: 
The Midnight Marauder 

Each day, just before dusk, ranchers 
and farmhands pile into pickup t nicks 
and fan out across the rolling prairie of 
northeastern Nebraska. They park mostly 
on ridges or hilltops, where they can 
scan the pastures and the narrow roads 
that wind through them. With rifles and 
shotguns leaning against their trucks, the 
men watch nervously, smoking cigarettes 
and talking with each other over a net- 
work of citizen Vband radios. Some of 
the men will stand guard all night, yet 
none of them really knows what he is 
looking for. *Tvc never seen anything 




•Warpath*: Tribesman soliciting tolls 



like this," says State. Sen. Jules Bur- 
bach, who has represented Knox County 
for eighteen years. "Folks are almost 
hysterical."* 

Since last May, more than 100 cattle 
have been found dead and gruesomely 
mutilated in Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa. 
Cn John Sunderrnarss farm outside 
Madison, Neb., a cow was killed with a 
blunt instrument last June and her udder 
and sexual organs svere cut off. When a 
veterinarian examined the corpse, he 
found that all of the animal's blood had 
been drained. On the nearby ranch of 
Vern Stringficld, a month-old bull calf 
was clubbed to death. Its blood was 
drained off, too. and someone cut a 
hole in the calf's side, removing the 
intestines oud coiling them neatly next 
to the head. 

Humor and anxiety have produced a 
host of unproved tWrics to explain the 



bizarre events. Many people, noting that 
$oinr of the victims were black, sn*rw>t 
that drvntevs of witchcraft rrniy h ; \vr 
done the foul deeds. "It tcmUl he some- 
one setting up a fertility cult of moth* 
kind," says Hichard Thill, a Cennatt- 
s Indies professor at the University of 
Nebraska who teaches t toner edit witch- 
craft courses, "or it emild be someone 
putting you on. If they are putting you 
on, they are pretty sick." A few residents 
report sighting strange creatures re- 
sembling bears and gorillas, and at least 
one fanner claims that a shitty UFO 
landed in a Held where a slaughtered 
animal was later found. 

Rustlers: Still others think the killings 
may be the work of marijuana smug- 
glers, who supposedly use searchlight* 
equipped helicopters to harvest the wild 
stands of pot known to grow in Ne- 
braska. A helicopter often has been seen 
Iioveriiig over the range around the time 
of a mutilation, and some ranchers swear 
they have been chased down lonely 
roads by choppers. Helicopters are also 
said to have been used in cattle rustling, 
and some stockmen think the rustlers 
may be collecting blood and organs as 
lures for tattle grazing on the open 
range this fall. 

As the tension mounted, law-enforce- 
ment officials held statewide conferences 
to sift the accounts and to calm the rifle- 
toting cattlemen. They organized a posse 
for a fruitless search of the area. The plot 
thickened when autopsies were conduct- 
ed on some of tiie dead animals. The 
doctors reported that most of the animals 
had died of natural causes, such as bac- 
terial infectious and kidney disease, or 
from swallowing oil that had been 
dropped ou the range. Afterward, the 
medical reports concluded, the car- 
casses were chewed by predator coy- 
otes, wolves, bu?.zards. eagles or even 
magpies. 

Cuts: The explanation doesn't suit ev- 
eryone, "Why did:i*t we notice this sort of 
thing in other years?" asks one skeptic. 
"The predators are not wolves," insists 
Senator Burbach. "They are a scntido* 
tuesticatcd, two-legged animal called 
man." Noting that many of the cuts 
seemed to have been done with a blade, 
Corden Cru!>cr, an organizer of the pa* 
trols, remarked: "I've yet to sec a coyote 
who can chew a straight edge." 

Some officials are beginning to worry 
tliat the real danger is not some ghostly 
butcher, hut the kryrd-up vigilantes 
themselves. After two slugs pierced the 
canopy of a utility-company helicopter 
checking power lines, the Nebraska Na- 
tional Cuard ordered its helicopter pilots 
to cruise cross-country at higher altitudes 
than usual— generally 2,000 feel instead 
of 1,000— to avoid being fired upon by 
frightened ranch hands. **! would hate 
to think what would happen," a Cuard 
spokesman told Newm\>:i:k's William 
Schmidt, "if one of our pilots was forced 
to put down a disabled chopper in a 
pasture at night. Someone micht get 
killed." 

KeH»week« Srplemhrr 31ft. 1974 




Ji ■ 





\ ' - * ' 5 ' ■ ■ ■ ' 




A *i*«ctrs tet'c^ w .> "few- 
: TO^bi fscuasr c*£ Hat ttbcn — ^^^^^ 



5y JKITZ TirO>ErSGX 



* A? with TfcrdtsdoOTT rf* pr^ *S*r Ife!^ »*2J» J^Jjf 
'd^ LTOi^stmr^la ltox c<ottA Gecoet »d State 






w^s rubric viTter sokbk &r>j <?-subi* 
S^f it wJli hsv* ccci^raJ co ;Le 
.hts:}^ lhr^:^3 rorursi rw*t ! 
it vo: 1 cool V[w - be , 

"* *S*A - * ^ * 

Tdc i^r* v:~"rS v^v t 5 lie 
. first swft f?s! ifws to hsr? C*c£2 
0-^:?pc;c;? is .cc-TrC^CTiCD %nth the" 



• drz r*s, em ii txi off lo :Ne north. . 
and dswryesirfb r^o Afl 
yot>coD!<5?cc*es;irrd light. It-"-' 
S^ppsafii so fhSSL 1 1« red ssxred;* 

, in S7>jn7sng.*; : *V * : • 



Mrs. V*4 r*i 



"5 cs *3 
ht Sh= 



brr-Tt^ h>r fcssc tod that erf" 123 





, 1 tr« <anatss Evit>5 xear cads 1* i. 1 • 



£tr^>cddcd i c lie calcnti. "STc 
tbt enh^ tie b tie pete 




|i — *' - ■ f 
*1 had jos: grot 
^^«?y the rwafiT ^ 
rA ^rao£c iig ht,v jfee recalled. ;U 
jposgixt jxisfbc tte pdjhbccs >?rr 



• j, : V_L — r:' 'V - ^ * eH5 » * szverca locEce. eyes 

* A JS °^Z\ Sdko &^::\: ***** ooz^myxL x^4"; 



\ Mutilated Cow is DiecowedinDulce Area' 



cow — 



DtfUfK - A mutilated dow — the 
wvtnlft In the area thla yew — hia 
bee n found near Du!cc wid a State Po- 
lice officer *oyi hn tellsv&e ho Jun 
found 4:v\&+ nco, the cattto ara bete? 
transported eUcwhers for the mutil«» 
ttoni and the carcams r*:unwd to th^ 
nntMnWhomo paa turn tluriarn* 
n!aht 



The mutilation occurred *tt\u ! 



tlowhero. Ha.bcHovw the cattta aw ? 

itrMtcd from the pasture during the / Manuel Gomw ranch, in i paitw 
night, uktn to a aedwhd arc*, mutl*! rollea east of DuJcc, Come* lui 
Ifittd and returned to the OA2tura. / four Mrtin'm mttK!>HAM * 



bred and returned to the pa:tur». / 
"You could tell where thtuo dimpe' 
or viici weraaHiched/* he nld> "I'm' 
ppiltlvt ttey do their worK 50uu*here 



4 * 



1 Tfe* earefljjf of the most recent mutf* 
J Jetton vaadUcovertd V/ed&ndfiy.Tlu 
udd*r find the rectum cf a ^yofir-old 
Hereford cm* had been wv w od, nmj e 
pardon cf IjJo lower lip v/aa roluing 



%. Yh* ew, he jaW, wu lying on It* 

rwht side and there do evidence 
of e struggle. Only a minimal amount 
of Wood vraa new thn body: 



paaturi U 
lui loii 

four wttia to mutilation* iin« l?7t/ 
Titer* have been a total of 10 mutUt* ' 
tiona In the area duricg the put ft? 
yaara. ' 

1 Repeatedly fruatreted in attempt! to * 
unravel jtie mutilation ceaci, valda . 
Tfcuraday uld ha tattsdi to tnertbla * 
moet of the Gorcex cattle "to lei Jf 4 



• VaWet 'wJd the anknal'i vertalm 
were broken, 

Thurtday effernccjf, ti Vttit, Tmaj, 




quorqueiiaitembllnt a device to» 
examine tha cattle* "Wt'fl get Ilia htri :: 



Inveitlgatore ratlmtta t»^e TmnUi-.- te^mof Invenicaiora — recently-. in a corraj'and nm tbem throuirh tte i 
Itofl occurred Mott!*y niftht. On th^ formed. to probe. muiLU^a utafiulnc^iot^m chrnn and if tv* cm BbAj 
eiuno d^:c ex.ictJ7 2 ye^w a^o^ n rw:ch« tlirccjhotjt tbe Wtrt fo? the " "anything ^.Valdti wddT Ha uldr^ 
c^si wul a wdet of wyiurloue trtcVs tfefw y«iri — arrive* In Dulcc to^ cxpecta 'to conduct tbe txperinLj 
y/m ^kcoverrd in th* xrex Str.w JV* ^nniine the site and Hie carcaaar' next Wceiu " v * ■ 
Ilea officer C*bo VaWa »,dd n» tar* . 

case iluVi week wAafwatcd within 2C0 1 . 

viwtls of w?:cre the csr«s> found 

In the W6 c«* ^ 1 - . r 

r 

I 




• • • .t f . • 

In examining tho c*tcji.?i . Valdoi i 
afJd he found thet the !:Yt tront lest 
and the left re.ir had been 
fncttirtl. He eiid ho couW clearly ^ 
pert*!?* IridSRittlona b tfte- n^h,;' 
ne:r tho fwcfcrcj, ^nd ho betleveii! 
th:y wxd left by c!*m;* cttachtd to . 
the Mdtuftl'f (ejfit 





JTe 3 ** S* Ck>< 

** -' ii 
if* .1 

-to? * 



ggll 1 



f - 5 to ;* 

' o ^ « o 



w § * 3 — ** 

;~» ^ ^ fc: rt 



?4 
-SI 



eii * g ^ 

»■ r' ■■- 



AS 




£*§:■; 



-c^a «J2 t J^ 





ill! 

a* 3 . 

^ « E 

rj - p o 5 



ff > v ** 



m 14 *r 
si 



Or; _ 



^! *t £? 

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t> S -5 



1^ 



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a K s 



£5 



is- 




th5T II ten 



[ 5^0; T;^x V^r-Tj to Ki -; ^ a 

t ■ WW » " 

r;td f-^itE^' ncW7-rf DliTTtv; 



r in: 

••25 



*- Tbroe trfej iasar 

a tUy later described » "i *cj-7 
^S*tt (roje tghr ocisaie cbar 



yibL EiWVir^; w*o E-Ws : ia:; 
CDtof Tbeb^roci^aid the light I 

— • < , ; t , ■ v , ' v : ' - 
]bsJ Just eo^s to]bec! abd rotf- >| 
dorfy &e jot Ijti5> with a I*ihi ; * « 



< ^ *v ■ 

cool 
: pots 



U In 
Kid 






[fLtilpted Cow is Discovered.!!! Duljcje"' Afea' 



claawtoro. tfo.fectleves tfia cittla *f« ; 
airlifted, (rait tin paitura 4urSn| She ' 
nljhr, tiiitn to a aoeitidtd arm, tmitk' 
tatcd and retunud to Itus pasture / 
"You could tell whero tlw* clampi 
or vbei «er**«(ttched l M ha li&'Tm* 
l*o*ltlv* ibey do their work aoroewhwo 

nliht- v ,i : --v , t Tfw «w, J»e «(d, wu lying ot> It* 

- % . T * ' ■ ' 't itfb! fiirift and thcr? so c*Id*ftca 

<of a itrujflli Only * mtalmf unimt 4 



ThamutlfiHono«urrcd\,^ha 

Minn*! r.ftru** 



aovtmh In the orr,* this year — haa 
born found nenr Dwlcc fiid i Slab Po- 
lice fifflar iayi ha taltevfti ho to 
found rtvftenco, the ctttto ira tetoj 
irnmpcrtcd tlitwhtn for ths mufilji* 
ttem aitd th* caitaam raraiiad to ths 



J 



' Ttecftrauu of thsmoit rtcattmufr 
lAttonvjus rfijrcovcrsd Y7ad&:id*y, Thv* 
tidier fepd tht return cf a ^yjar-oid 
Hartford cow hud bcan'uvf'fad, tni t 
portion cf tii'j lower !lp vm miwlny 

Invtatla&tort eittnuie tha mutfji 



fclfjfxl tva* war tha body; 

- Yafcht laid fta atdnud'i vartaliri* 
were broken. 

# .ThtfKtay aftc rroof, a ParU, Taiiit 
twin of InvatiUratora — rocantly* 



miles uit of DulcflrCmai iua fort 
four catdt'ta mutUationi aim 197*. 
niw* iwv« batg t total of io mafia* 
lioiu Id tha art* durtog tfcs put ttra 

Ropeitedly rrottrttid In attempt to 
unravel jha mutilation tajci, Valdat 
Tburodty laid ha lnrtndt to aifewWi 
west of tha Cot&w'cattla *to rat if 
they ira belrnr mirkK) Jn wy wit that 
cantttldcmlfladlnUndarkatWi 4 ^ 



Ha wi 4 rallrtd itUatUt In Atb^< 
quorqueiifliietnbllnt tdivlcoto* 

\ a&emiiia iK« catUi* gel U» haij: 
In i corral -and ruo tfcem through iha 



lloa odcorrcd Mur/Tdy rijIiE. On tha v {SfJSJfl-^f ^ and fais 1/ w» caa (hi 



r, 



EWLio tiji,c ^ yc^r* ojij r a car* 

cjsnarJLa «rta?i of mynurlou? tncka 
v/cra dbcovvred in the arcs, Stula ^ 
it« officer Cib^ VaWa tAid ihc tv^ 
cias thin was loriicij ivithta SCO ;, 
^rda of where tha carota wca found 

- v;; .i 

Valdex he cotilt! nnl diicstn wy - 
TPicxa in | ha ftrira of t!js Moi^ay -nXtha \ 
wtybti^, nor covU &e ftfli any 
tfprlnu Jjft by thd, mutUat^ ccw, " 

In onamlnlnj fta" VaWu t 

add he feynd that the !ctt front U« 
tm<J t(i« i?ft rciir l*? had ba£n 
fnctvjrtl. H* eild ho uotiM cltarly _ 
pcr::iv« indetiU'.irai tit fha- f;cj^ f % 
n;:r tha fracwre?, *>r^,ho tMjltsvCi v' 
t^:y wrra Jtft by clam;« Htached to ■ 
the arJtital*a lest, ; 



p«t liirco yean — Arrived In DijIcc to- 
^*tftnilntt tha alto iiitl lh« carcaur 



■nytwnt'-vuan aaidPH* a-v~ -t* 
exptcti to cocduct tha trteii tt 
tiastt/«)c *" ■ ■ w - 



(U ' ' ' ■ O 





Four Mutilated Cows Feiiad Near Bulce . jj 

CJi^ — IUC ^£££5 crcrrccr \ txur.TKho traced thn* cf tto cwx. v tfc* axinals recast hzi iztz cored. 

rk ~ ., * t- -,.wt^ ♦ • Hi stkl tlat four d!$cCi-> 

of kt^jiIs hire bcea foc^i *t * siatfe rD4 ^ cf ,v c -. rAcs3 u tf * k;f rf & ^ 

l;cr— sa. - 'jth*j^«^abu^»f<^i^J^irKip3!c^«.'• I>J« area since >\friL • • : • 



Q 



■ 



u - f a; 




Four Mnnlated- Cows Found Near. Dulee . 

. * • • - 

fJ ^>^K«^«^r e ^^cr^i^^if. ^i^'^S^TS 




: ' ■ Mutilated Cmlea/ 
; Foummcqr Cilia 

*■ •'.■•*' 1 . * 

Jooro.ilSpwm- ■»•:'■'• 
' Tlwru weranotridu. 





October 16, 197S 



Mr. Manuel S* Gomez 

General Delivery w 
Dulce, t;cw Mexico 07528 

Dear Manuel \ 

This letter is with further reference to the livestock mutilations 
that have been plaguing northern l:ew Mexico and southern Colorado 
ranchers in recent nonths. 

Enclosed is a letter from Chief Martin E* Vigil, Director of the 
Uew Mexico State Police, written in response to izy inquiry on your 
behalf. Enclosed also are copies of all the mutilation reports pre- 
pared by Officer Gabe Valdez, 

Officer Valdoz has assuredeme that his investigation is continuing, 
but so far has developed no positive leads as to the identity of 
the uutilator4s) - Please be assured that I will stay in touch with 
the State Police, and will contact you again if any new information 
becomes available. 

Thanks again for the opportunity to be of service, and please don't 
hesitate to contact my office again if I can i^e of further assistance. 

Sincerely,* 



Harrison Schmitt 

9 

HS:wc 

Enclosures 




-A 




STATE OF NEW MEXICO 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 
NEW MEXICO STATE POLICE 



JERRY A POD AC A, coverhoa 
0y DR, CHARLES E. BECKNELL, 

AdmmtitJ-*lW« Servfcfi D^iiiiW 
Go*rectigrts Di union 
Ctiminjl Jutto* Support Drn»twi 
fin* Ueitco Suit folic* 
Adult Pjrotr Boird 
Juvenile Pirolt &o*rd 
Grilled Q»m» frevroticm C«*nMfri*n 
PuN*C Dtftndtr 



September 19, 1978 



Pctt Off e* . 

St*i« rot™ 



r 



The Honorable Harrison Schmitt 
U. Senator for New Mexico 
1251 Dirksen Senate Office Building 
Washington, D* C. 20510 

Dear Senator Schmitt: 



Pursuant to 
from Mr* Man 
of the royste 
for the p^st 
Police Offen 
with reports 
and whatever 



your correspondence, dated July 10, 1978, regarding a request 
ucl Gomez of Dulce, New Mexico, for a government investigation 
rious livestock mutilations which have plagued Rio Arriba County 

two years, attached hereto kindly find official New Mexico State 
se/Incident Reports submitted by Officer Gabe Valdez, together 

from members of the Kew Mexico Livestock Board, for your informat; 

disposition you deem appropriate! 



Trusting the information is satisfactory, I remain 
Very truly yours, 





CHZEf MARTIN E. VKJltfi DIRECT'OR* 
Hew Mexico State Police 

MEViWJBijl 



" ; » * 



^CLOSURES (26 PAGES) FOR LETTER DATED OCTOBER 16, 1978, TO MR. MANUEL ■ S . 



GOMEZ 



..." '■■ ■■ • • 

•DATE: August 1975 

OWNER: Jinrcy Wall - 13 miles South and 1£ miles West of Percales. K, 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Calf 
DATE DIED; August 28, 197.5 

POSITION FOUND IK: _ y$ 
fl ORCANS-TAKE?L&^lvV^ ■ N ^ 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None 
INSPECTOR: Lloyd Newman 



"• t e rrainal' -colon? \\T A 

— ~ ; \ " 



JJATE: SEPTEMBER 9, 1975 • 
O'.ttER: Alva A. Simpson, Jr. - Abiquiu. New Mexico C/5 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Bull, hereford .- * ' 

DATE DIED: Between 5:30pm August 30, and 8:30pm August 31, 1975 
POSITION FOUND IN: Right side Q. 
ORGANS-TAKEN :C^Scr o turn jj£pen i s p re c turn" 1 "? 

TRACK EVIDENCE: Vet ground and an elbow imprint was found 3. O . 

INSPECTOR: * Pat Archuleta 

■ • - 

DATE : October A, 1975 

OWNER: Mark Crow the r, San ford, Colorado . 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Bull 
DATE DIED: October 4. 1975 

POSITION FOUND IN: > . 

ORGANS TAKEN: tongue cut out, half of left ear cut off, testicles, 
. penis and rectum had been removed.. * 

TRACK EVIDENCE: . There was hair on logs and birush, also several trees 

about three* inches in diameter had been broken down 
where, it appeared he had been down prior to his dentl 

INSPECTOR: Paul B« Riley .* 

■ 4 m • 

DATE: October 11, 1975 

OKKER: Virgina Aycock - Springer, New Mexico .g 3 

ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Cow •' 

DATE DIED: October 11. 1975 

POSITION FOUND IK: • , . 

ORGANS TAKEN i ..Left eye picked out, the. ba^ had been cut- our including 
".some hide around if-, that was all that was taken, j '■■ 

TJ7»CK EVIDENCE: tfono tented ; , ' . * . - . 3 s 

INSPECTOR: Harold Gilbert ■. . - " ■ 



■/"' OWNER: . Sam Britt - 33 miles Vest of Clayton, New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Hereford bull, 3 years, H00-1500 lbs. 
DATE DIED: 36-48 hours before October 11 
POSITION FOUND IN: Ri^ht side 
ORGANS TAKEN ri^Scrocum, 1 - 'penis," rectum 
TRACK EVIDENCE: 1 None stated 

INSPECTOR: Frank Besc . * ■ 

DATE: October 13, 1975 

OWNER: Alvin Stocton - Raton, New Mexico , . * , 

A*NIMAL DESCRIPTION: Bull 
DATE DIED: October 11, 1975 , 
POSITION FOUKD IN: Right side 

ORGANS. TAKEN; -^Scrotum testicles, penis -'and end of sheath"'. 

< TRACK EVIDENCE: Only those made by Mr.' Stocton. Sheriff Grubilnik. 
•_■ and Ben Vooten 

INSPECTOR: Ben Wooten 
DATE : October' 15, 1975 

OWNER: W. F. Martin - Springer, Now Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Black bull ' ' . 

DATE DIED: October 15, 1975 

POSITION FOUND IN: - ■ ' . / 

, ORGANS TAKEN: Rectum, penis, testicles' 
TP.ACK EVIDENCE: None stated 
INSPECTOR: '. Harold Gilbert . 

DATE: October 18, 1975 " ; 

OWNER: Rock Ranch - Kara Vis'a., New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Black angus cow 

DATE DIED: Found October 16 - had been dead seven to' eight days pri 
POSITION FOUND IN: Laying on back '.. 
ORGANS TAKEN: Rectum and vagina- ' 
TRACK EVIDENCE:. None noted .■ 
INSPECTOR: Dwayne Mas soy 



• ■. Q 0 

»t\x£: ".October z**, i\ti$ 
, ' CVRER: Mark Crowthcr - Kan ford, Colorado , 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Bull, registered 
, DATE DIED: Had been dead three or four days 
POSITION FOUND IN: - 

ORGANS .TAKEN tongue and' left ear 

TRACK EVIDENCE: Only those of bull 
INSPECTOR: Paul Riley • . ' 

DATE: October 29, 1975 

CV.T.'ER: Sam Dunlap - Tucunicari, Hew Mexico , " 

ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: * Bull 
DATE DIED: October 29, 1975 

POSITION FOUND IN: . 

ORGANS -'TAKEN ::*4tSB^al ;, '.pr^ 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None stated 
INSPECTOR: D. F. Garnett 

DATE: ' November 4, 1975 . ' . 

OVNER: Robert Burns - Nara Visa, New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Cow, black angus 

DATE DIED: Had been dead six or seven days when found 
POSITION FOUND IN: Laying on back 
..ORGANS TAKEN: '.Sexual organs and tongue "also left ear 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None specified - varmits had eatten on the animal 
INSPECTOR: D. F. Garnett " •■ 

DATE: November 5, 1975 ■' : 

OWNER;. C. A. Ragland - Tucumcari, Hew Mexico ■ 
AKIKAL. DESCRIPTION: Heifer calf, 450 lbs. 
DATE DIED: November 5, 1975 

POSITION FOUND IN: • 

ORGANS, TAKEN: . All sex organs, bag ''skinned off, flesh gone < 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None stated 

INSPECTOR: D. F. ■ Garnett 



. OWNER: Herman Riley - 
^ -ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Black cow ' 
DATE DIED: November 11, 1975 
' POSITION FOUND IN:* Right side 

ORGANS TAKEN : ;^Tongue',^eye~^Oexposed) 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None 

INSPECTOR: ' Mel Sedillo. Jr. ' 

DATE: November 11, 1975 
OWNER: Forrest Atchley - 

ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: 6 to 7 n.o. old steer calf, tlacV.-mottle faced, 

still on mother. 

DATE DIED: November 8 or 9, 1975. 

POSITION FOUND IN: . . 

. ORCANS '..TAKEN is^Rectua " ■'• ■ 

TRACK EVIDENCE: . None noticed 
INSPECTOR: Dwayne Massey 

DATE: ; November 13, 1975 
OWNER: M & M Feed Lot - 
. ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Yearling heifer ' 
DATE DIED: November- -12, 1975 

* 

■ POSITION FOUND IN: ' Right side' 
ORGANS TAKEN: "Udder and sexual organs* 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None [ ■ . 

INSPECTOR: Bud Kc Adams 

DATE: November 16, 1975 C 
OWNER : Bert Cox - Quemado, New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Cow 

DATE DIED: October 24, 1975 ■ ... 
POSITION FOUND IN: Laying on back . ; . , . 

ORGANS. TAKEN: None .' 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None reported 
INSPECTOR : . Tom Wagner 



O O 

unitLi January a>, ib/u 

OWNER; Sam Criego - Pivitada, New Mexico 

ANIMAL DESCRIPTION*; Black Motley face L£ 
DATE DIED: December 26, 1975 
POSITION FOUND IK; Left side 

0 RGA KS EN : Cut all of the rectun, udder, two holes on jugler vci; 

on right side, hole in beewcen front Icrs, a little b« 
which looked like the/ mifiht want' to pet to the heart 
Two holes on b^ick in front of hip bones came size as I 
ones in neck, one to each side of spine right across, 
looked like they were made from thr- air while cow was 
standing up. All sexual organs; and udder. were . taken. 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None except for bird tracks O. 

INSPECTOR: Pete B. Marez 

DATE: January 19, 1976 , 
OWNER: Dipper Cattle Company - Pintada, New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Crossbred red motley face 
DATE DIED: December 19, 1975 
POSITION FOUND IN: Left side 
ORGANS - TAKEN All-- sexual-- organs* and "tongue f ' 
TRACK EVIDENCE; None 
■INSPECTOR: Pete B. Karez 

DATE: February 14, 1976 13 
OWNER: Rhea Howe - Engle/ New Mexico 

ANIMAL. DESCRIPTION: 2 yr.. old Charloais-Hereford heifer, 700 lbs. 

DATE DIED: Between February 11 and 13, 1976 

POSITION FOUND IN: * Back and left side 

ORGANS -TAKEN;, 1,', Udder -j ">:'* 

TRACK EVIDENCE: Rained night before 

INSPECTOR: Tom Bennett • " t 

DATE: April 23, 1976 

OWNER: Pete Gutierrez - Chilli, New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Blue Roan Mare 

DATE DIED: Nighe of April 22 or 23, 1976 . '/ 
POSITION FOUND IN: Laying on her back '/ ■ 
ORGANS TAKEN: Dag' 'area 'and rectum area • . ' .. . 

TRACK EVIDENCE: Numerous track of coyote's (or dog) in .evidence 
INSPECTOR: A. J. Cibbs 



UATE:- May ly,(_//6 * O 

/.' OWNER: Sharp Ranch - Corona. New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION': El ack angus bull 
DATE DIED: May 15, 1976 
POSITION FOUND IN: Left side on back 
ORGANS rTAKEAT^TesiicicV^^eimv'ciy 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None 
INSPECTOR: Claude Foster ' 

DATE: June 29. 1976 
OWNER: Tony Lamb - 

'ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Yearling steer 

DATE DIED: 48 hours prior to date 

POSITION FOUND IN: Left side 

ORCANS-TAKENfit-RightjeaVandxight eyo.^the tongue, circle cut 

. ^out ad^hiSvnavel.-.V'penis'was gonev>and he had also 
• been cud around 'his* rectum. * - ■ - • ■ ■■ 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None stated 

. INSPECTOR: 'Harold Gilbert 

DATE: July 10. 1976 

OWNER: . • 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Buffalo calf 
DATE DIED: July 10, 1976 
POSITION FOUND IN: 

ORGANS TAKEN: i Tongue, testicles and penis. Cut at the rectum. 

also gone was large intestine. 

TRACK .EVIDENCE: A white helocopter was seen the morning of July 8 

* DATE: July 1, 1976 
OWNER: Stanley Cisneroj*.- Questa , New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Solid red cow - pregnant 
DATE DIED: June 29' or June 30, 19.76 
POSITION FOUND IN: 'Laying on right side 
ORGANS TAKEN : Left' eye \ udder was cut off 

TRACK EVIDENCE: None ' ■ ,- : s. • 

. INSPECTOR: Milton Ctilbertson 




.DATE: August 24, 1976 

OWNER: Charles Linder. Hernandez. New Mexico 
ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: 3* nonth old Charloai* bull calf 
DATE DIED:' August 21, 1976. 
POSITION FOUND IN: Left side 

ORGANS- TAKEN^Penis'aT^cVsticles".^ 
TRACK EVIDENCE: None 
INSPECTOR: Jim Byrd 

DATE: September 8, 1976 . • 

-OWNER: Pacific Western Land Company 

ANIMAL DESCRIPTION: Black cross bred steer calf,' 4 mo. old ' * 
DATE DIED: September 5 or 6, 1976 

POSITION FOUND IN: Left side ■ . 0 

^ORCANS/.TAKEK^rV^ \ ''- [ 

TRACK EVIDENCE: .None *' * 

- INSPECTOR: Gene Donohoe ■; 

' * * 

L#^<Cfco» - /f^^S€ Chf-^-r* 7**.*ftf „ 



MUTILATION REPORT 

INITALLY KPORTED BY - AIo^I ^JlJj ^M 

ANIMAL DISCRETION -Vv/U*. f* c </ ©a I I - C Pfp-X../^ * J 
DATE ANIMAL DIED OR WAS MUTILATED {AS ACCURATE AS POSSIBLE) - T^Os" # 
POSITION ANIMAL WAS WHEN FIRST SEEN (RIGHT OR LEFT SIDE) - / " . q 

DATE AN I HAL WAS LAST SEEN - 7^/?^ ' . & 

AREAS MUTILATED - f?^<J t f Yl rt P | J / 

ORGANS TAKEN (DESCRIBE IN DETAIL) - ^ "l 0 ^ 0 ^ UJ C\ j; c^(s- 0 



TRACK EVIDENCE (ANIMAL, VEHICLE, BIRDS, ETC. ) - <D I u ' LU 

DISTANCE FROM PU3LIC ROAD ON RESIDENCE - [Zfy P r 

ALWAYS TAKE PHOTOGRAPH OF CARCASS AND SCENE. . 5 * 



/ 



' DISTRI 



iti *\j/tV*i^# Lrv-riCivrs, • -„.., , ' . - 



6 ) 



o 



i. ac^cy;. r^v^Sv^A^^^:;^^ i UR1 <NM M ■ 



>.* C JCUD DfT TYPE. ; •^■fvfS.?* j-U- *?.*■•*.* y\ i.'i'.V ' ->'> 



3. FILE NUMBER 



6. i*K£M]Sn TVi'c (Cuciou 



I Highway 



4 Ch 



Commerce 



Service S ta lion 



7; Occident location -:.,vy i : ir-J^~\\s • / : * T; V r t > v. • ' 



GEO 

i7 



7 



10. WEAPON TYPE (Circle O 



Tunc 9. ^jUN(^HW*jK/^K ' 
'-. YES»= ]S NO ] j UMC 



Cunj 2 1 CutT?nsToof| 3 



id 



8. INCIDENT DATE V 



DATE 



untie ten 



TXT 
75? 



11. COMPLAINANTS -.- .V.Sj/r*. ^t-.>^...'»^V.T-%-.'^:- 



12. ADDRESS . 

P. 5ox*372» ISalce, ». tl. 87523 



hi 19. ADDRESS v ^r^Wi' 1 * *v v -<«" > V - -V • v : t » 



14. VICTIM'S NAME . 

• - • * - * • w m * * » • * . 



22. NAME >iO. (CncJe One) FA RENT SUSPECT , >1 IN ^5 , V; ^^-N J - . 



27.ADDR£SS^t>**'0 r C^V^—VivJ?-"- *l?y v ";«t : V\ 



. 2». A^o 



XL. MA»I£N0.2- (CiicleOne) PARENT ' SUSPECT .. WITNESS . WA RRAjNT ...^ • . 



27. ADDRESS ■» vAVir-'.i U-"*-:'«f •«s^."-. * •> V 



34.. VALUER : 



35. color t - -*c- ; -rr.r 



36. YEAR 



45... 



28. Ago 



16. Sex) 
21- 



17. Dee of Birth 



23. Soc.Sec.No.' _ 



53. Socbec.No. : 



24.R>x 



18. K 

751 
TO 



25.5c<|26 



■nrrr 



29..Hetiht 



30. Weight 



39. STYLE 



37. VEHICLE MAKE v v 138. MODEL. ~ ~ v; ■ - 

'•iTus U3.LIY |44. vehkJlLsVatus, ; 5 ; 7 



41. LICENSE NO.. .. 



24.R.vJ^.Scn 2i 



31. .Km [^iT 



s 



r 



46. CRIMINAL DAMAGE AMOUNT 



51. 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



• """"T]sale/Mfs | } Vsc 



CURRENCY 



OFFICE EQUIIMENT TV. RADIO , Etc 



$ 



CONSUMABLES 



*«• S 



5 .i' 1 



47. UWikOLLEii SUkol^tr 



. JEWELRY . 



UVESTOCK 



457WcIuri 



[50- 



CLOTHING : 



S 



FIREARMS 



OTHER 



VEHICLES . 



HOUSEHOLD 



S * 



TOTAX: 



• V 52. R ECOVERED PROPERTY 
Stolen Locally-Recover 
Stolen Locally-Recorei 
Stolen Other-Recover© 



55. CASE STATUS 

# 



53. DATE OFFENSE RtiOKHrl 



54. DATE RETORT PREPARJ 



. ..-;:>• m Active -yfi, riq^ b y ; *'*;>/v r ; v^J' 

i Ftr^Hon.Hv near ad. ExoUin 



4* V 



On. Gfi-23~7& nt Ap^roccls^tir^y ©tt>Q £-=w Iftv Jlaouol Gotom^ DuLcc, JU II. con- 
tact**! -writes: by public oervico staging that ho batl f ouod a tbxeo y<uir aid 
cm. ct bis rrtacb vMcb e?**aaroo to haw bcsa ntitilstodt -ani fchofc hs -c&ild 
ILia* for rarxtsr to check into it, tfrit&r c3viss4 lir* Gcc&z that ha 
OXk ox£ ct4 tbat ho would proceed tbcro at SrOO cq 06-14*76 

Vritor confute ted^rScv Iteul Eilcy o£ tba Stacico Cattle Sanitary 3osd 
procea^ca to tbeT Ccpcui Tl^nch- Upon rjnrivrvl at tio Enr-ch* cbsoxv^sJ 
tK^t ih^ only vtrhieio fcrcck* vera tJvisa or Hf- Gc**£x*u pick u;>» Slnco bis 
rnccb £3 lccbsd ui> mxl tbo c^ly -antr^ca Isl tbrotivfc tlm £nt^ upeti by writer. 
At tba nctoe^ vritor c^ai^cd fc3io cttcsso of n 3 yr. obi bir-ck Uiitc-7ncc*l 
cov v*iicb uas lying on ±t*o riflSit slue* *ha Is* it cjiit > tba tan^ue^ tb» utfcor^ 

£hA ^etsoct bai beiro r<saov<Nl vith vbot appear**! to bo a tih&rp ?jre:clM 
ir^trwcjit^ tta tx^cira ui blood 7**ro left on tbe ckln o£ fcba ccw, Tha Mua 
on tbo mu'i&nsi^ch ai£o o£ tbo CO.; v.ts vbit^ Do tbnt epoetin o£ blood vfc^Id 
cav*> b(M3 tosily ifetcccLxl* C-Ii&c cvitJeccNSf on tbo cm a fari^li puncture 
on tbo brif&ftfc* 17o otlxrr oviiicscca irr? ^vdSUhla c*£ to c^uoo o£ vleaEJi* 

^Irc^r-nfc o£ cccr^ tj— i bed lontVJ t^ico # lcrr/i^g thvco pc«3 risrka ;x>3l- 
tl^r^l Irk n tri^ng^lpr ^aw^ tHic tfisctiEcii; of na^ii j>:xJ jur*:t w.s ht n + 

in dl^ot^r^ Xnve^ tis^ cicra at tbc scone* sbo:JCil that £1jovj c^-nil tzlr^lx 
hrxl f^llKttii. tiv^ ctrv £cr l ^rocr-:^\ii3 1 y oOO 1 ^ ?*\-tcba of tVj cc^/ r>^-cu vb-xco 
zh>& cSz^ssl&d r^*4 isilcnu ibo rsiall trljyrf trr.ic^ vetst csll trro^iM tha 
ca.v Ofcb^-r ovic^.^ca rio?>Gd £hat et^s^* r-rroTvl tb^ trivet c» r^bcy followed 
tb-i ccs?^ brhl bec-a ccorcbcd^ Al-ito a ycllw oily cub*t_c*>co lc<i^te4 in 
two plscaa voo*x tb^ fxull trip^i*. £hl3 L^cb5t: nnc^ v^s ciibr.ilttcU to tbo 
State* Pollen LAb. *ibe unrsble to detect fc^t crontfiot o£ tb* siibdtinica, 

A ztcz&lo o£ tbe ftrbst*-»iG vns s^aittsd to a ^-riv^to leb ccd t):cy ^crft u«ola 
£o nnalys* the &^t*toicro to tber £ncfc iiuit it diai?f^iTc4 o^ Cisscnti^ratec 
Si'in aazplii© verc cnalysed by tho St a to PolS« Lab ajx! tlu* Judical Etccaincr'a 
o2f iefc. It rapctft ctl tb&t, tba slcin bal bison, cut vith a sbicrp lji^trasontp. 

to &&^17-76 trrftcr contacted a I!r„ Ew?n>3 5u^2c« £ro=s Albti*jc«r*;iift > JL 11* 
to yroc**d to tic st^DO rwl CTsxJnct a vodLutlp^i test* Tbla vas 3 days 
<i£t^r tbo iucidr*it lisd occured-- Ilis £Itm!±ii3A i>&ra thrA crtnind the triped 
norfca szwi in tbo iiswoiate trocks^ tba lot ioa lirvci vns tvira tha r^rrwl 
backsrwrttt raaling* tir. Sictt*ou ! 5 ^dlific^txocs ncy b& chec^ad C3 bo is 
a xotixoO aatentirt* £rc*s Sand la Lsb^ Aibucccrqac^ H* II* It is tbe ogripdoo 
of thi3 vrlfasr tbat radiation £te«lias» «o deaibor&b&ly beins left fit tbo 
£c£rs£ to tooSu^cx fc??e^ti^at or» p 

7ber9 ViMt -also <rvi^nc^ tifct C3*a trlpc4 narus bad rotnmocl rcxl xoswoved tbo 
left cat* Xripod rtorks t>tre focrtd ov^x Zbr* Gooax's tiro tracks of bis 
orisinal vl^it* " Ebo left car w» tact ubtsi Ur* Cco«s £tr»t foortd tba 



Cow Mutilation - Page 2 



The. cou hod a 3 laooth old calf which has not been located since, the incident 
This appears strange since a snail calf normally stays around the rother 
cow even ^though the cow is dead. 

Writer has conducted an Intensive investigation into approximately 23 cattle 
rwfcilations which have been reported in the state of Hew Mexico within the 
lost 16 months. They all carry the sa^e pattern* Also during this investi* 
gation writer has been able to determine that on one of the xrcttilatod cows 
which oc cured in JTcw Mexico, a high dosage of Atropine insecticide*^ ana- 
lysed in the blood system* 7b is substance is a tr annuitizing drug. The 
Los Aloaos Scientific lie search Laboratory has conducted a necropsy on 
several snisiala including ^ buffalo, which revealed that the anijaals 
had been highly infected with Black Leg* 

Investigation has also revealed th.it an all cattle jratilatioos which have 
occur ed in ttew Mexico and surrounding states, that the object of the Epi- 
lations has been the lymph node system. 

This vriter has been assisting Sheriff Tex Craves, Logan County , Sterling*. 
Colorado* Simples from Logan County Rutilatcd cows xtcro brought by this 
writer to be analysed by three private chemists, n3 it appears tbot the 
Government associated lab or i toxics are not reporting complete findings* 
The substance ishich was on the ccv (cutilated in J^o^an County) vas 
analysed as containing an ion exchange resin find Vitanin Bj^* Walter is 
working with Sheriff Graves due to the fact that Sheriff Graves has been 
unable to get cooperation froai Colorado State University in Che analysis 
of snnples. These trips have been iDade on **riter r s ovrt tirr-e and at his 
own expense. VJritex hn contacted several states where these iru til at ions 
ejdLst over the 1000 izark* 

During this period of investigation several theories have been thoroughly 
checked out such as a "Satan Vorshipera" group and predators. Both have 
been ruled out due to expertise and preciseness and the cost involved to 
conduct such a sophisticated and secretive operation* It should also be 
noted that during the Spring of 1974 when a tremendous voount of cattle 
were lost due to heavy snowfalls* the carcasses had been eaten by predd^ors* 
These carcasses did not resez&Xe the carcasses of the ontilated cows. 

Investigation has narrowed down to these theories which involve (1) Experi- 
oental use of Vitamin 331(1 ^ testing of the lycph node system, 
During this investigation an intensive study has been made of (3) Ifttat is 
involved In gens warfare testing, and the possible correlation of these 3 
factors (gem warfare testing, use of Vitamin testing of the lyinph Node 

System), 

./ 

Investigation is continuing on this case* 

Respectfully submitted, 

: . ' fiL&s tfa. 

■ ; * ■ *.. Gabriel I» Valdez 

liew Mexico State Police 



6' 



o 



5. INCIDENT TYPE 1 ; .> -i r>./".- ■(-....;-(■ ,- . ... ■ ■ ■ i . 



7. INCIDENT LOCATION rf" ;■. ~ ..„■, " ... . . 

Sierra AcaiiOiy ggj Hgdco lias S eiAaar , a ^mch '•' : ^ * 
S. INCIDENT DATE 7u nm Turn la ~ DATE Tstt , „Ju 



U. COMPLAINANTS Vh.; . .^^7.^ 



CEO 

17 



: - YES ' USK 



I 



6. PiCtSnStTTTZ iLoUt 



_Htth*3V 



Commerce 



Service Station 



7 Hanch 



10. WEAPON TYPE (Ciicle 
Cunl 2 | Cutti*^ Tool} 



12. AD OK ESS 



3 19. ADDRESS • , - . * 



to 



22, NAAt£ MX 1 (CiicJ*On*> y PAREMT 7iU5^£Cf i WITKT5S WANTED " " 



27. ADDRESS ^, v , t -^: : v 7; w :;>V 4 - ,v ; > \ \; S L , ^.v 



2S. Aft 



22. NAME NO* 2 (CueleOne) - PARENT . SUSPECT ; . WITNESS WANTED 



27. ADDRESS T *' ^ > *-r-;.-' , t ><■ v ♦ . • ■■ / . - v . , - 



^ P VALUE ^ 



35. COLOR - ,v.,r.. 



40. ViN 



36, YEAR 



JSTAie 



37*VEi^JCLE MAKE 



A 



n 



17, Doe of Birth 



IK.. 



TTT 



23. Soc.5cc.Nd. - 



30. Wc^ht _ 



JL Hal ,133: 



2J. Soc Sec. No, \ 



29. Hc^ht 



flTus 



41. LICENSE KO. 1. 



43.L1Y 



5^ 



;x 



5?- STYLE 



44- VEiiiLLiLiTAil/5 



P 



3 T11~n7 



44. CRLMJNAL DAMAGE AMDU>fT 



4 J . UWI kOLL U/ i>L tfi> I JJ,L£- 
SaJe/Mri ) ■ | ;?o^ 





SI. 


CURRENCY 


JEWELRY 


CLOTHING 


VEHICLES 






Stolen 


S 


S 


/* 








Recovered 


s 


J 


S 






u 




OFFICE EQUlfMENJ 


TV, RADIO .Etc, * 


Ft REARMS 


HOUSEHOLD 






Stolen 


S 


S 


S 




* 




Rccov*:t«1 


s 


5 


J 










CONSUMABLES 


LIVESTOCK 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


+ 




Sfolim 


S 


S 


S 








Rccovmd 


s 


. s 


S 








55. CASE STATUS 









7FTT77E" 



son 



52, RECOVERED PROPERTY 
Stolen LocjJIy-ReooveTu 
Stolen Locally 4* eco rare- 
Stolen Othcr-Re=OYt red 



— t 



f | Aclir» < : : [ Ctoftd 07 Arwrt \ j ^Unfoundad, ExpUIft 



S3. p-vrE orrt>i£ rjuxjrtld 



54, DATE REPORT FREPAREE 



... • ( - ) 

5. iSCi D ENT.TYPE ' • .v.? . . — . ~ ~ : — 




J 



1 i4. vjctim-s name ^ ■ . _ ; — : . z : — " 



12- ADDRESS . 



19. address .'■ .: ■ . . ... . , r-r. — 

NAME. Nf> i tTiTTiZ iw KTBTiCt cl rVbWW --■ ' 



22, NAME WD. J (Ciicje OncJ ; , PaRJEN! ^Uif'Wi 1 ..Wllhta4 WAMtD - - 



; P NAME NO, 2 (CbcteOnc)* ^ PARENT / , SUSPECT V WITNESS -WaNIED ?Ji 



27. ADDRESS ~ ~ T^ZTTT 7 ^7^^^— ~ ~ t , 

14. VALLnrr: 35. color * ■'s\.;^.^\ 



36, YE Ait 



29-JIcfehl |J0. Wotht 



2B. Age 

37.VEJJJCLEMAJa J,,, | Jtf.UOUtL J ~ ... . 



15. R» 



JO- oOLUFAf iOf* ~ ^ , — 



23. SocSfrc.No* ■ 



29. Hei£ht 



30. Wc^ht 

* *** 



t 



24.ftxcl25.S^ 



TTTf 



4KUCENSEN0, ~ .?2. US 



43* ilt y 



39, STYLE 
44. VLHJCUiTAiuS ; 



. I ••• I 

JL Hoix jf3; 



ha p 1^3 t*~aA agpassjx^jalz s ^ __Tho sa:c orr:mr> hid >cc n sa rgjpxil:/ r^ iZ^ ^~ 



W. CRIMINAL DAMAGE AMOUNT 

■* 



Stolen 



S(oJen 



Stolen 



CURRENCY 



|SaJe/Mfg j j vPo». j ■ 



OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



CONSUMABLES 



«.CAS£STATUS . : v ^ V ^.V ^J1^73 " ^ 



JE\VELRV 



TV, RADiO,E<c. 



LIVESTOCK 



CLOTHING 



FIREARMS 



J ■ 



OTHER 



VEHICLES 



HOUSEHOLD 



TOTAL 



35 



y g 5 2, R ECOVERED PROPERT" 
T Sto^n LocAUy-Recovn 
Stolen Locatly-Rccove 
Stolen OUier-Recovere- 



I- (S3. DATE OFFENSE REPOKTEE 



i4. DATE REPORT PREPARJE 



[EaccpUBnaUyCtewed, ExpUin 

JS * RJWTOC OFFICER (Signature* Number) - _ ~ ■ , . HT. APPROVING Off I«R (SiTUlarf* Number) J 

— ■ <T7 ^ -~ v — . _l ■ _ ' " ' ^ " * " 1 ; - t * 



* i: 



I 
I 



i 
i 



.0 



o 



S;iNQDENT TYPE - „ . ; ; . 



1, INCIDENT LOCATION -^v;.'7~^r " \ ~ ~ ~ 

3gKisfl'a Vigil 'g^Sanca Ztatcg/ Rev ^cdco " ^' ? 7^-- - 



8. INCIDENT DATlu Tin* to ~ DATE " T^r^STa AftutR ' UJSIK&^K 



Tito" 
17 



f ; : 



Highway 



Com/nerca 



Service Station 



arnica 



3Q. WEAPON TYPE {Cite 
1 I Gun I 2 [ CottiftKTori 



14. VICTLM*SNA>1£ - 



' r I Cen UaL rules, ITar 



v, 



exico 



I?, ADDRESS 



22- NAME NO, 1 (CiicJ* On«) PARENT WAN LED - 



27. ADDR£SS 



i ■' "» .■ i »■•■^ r '*■_ , "•^.' , ■■.F- i , *■ , *■ > ■ 



28- Ape 



22. NAME NO* 2 (CifdeOne) * v PARENT .SUSPECT - WITNESS WANTED 



27. ADDRESS * 



S4_ VALUE t 



35- COLOR X- • * 



40, ViN -^ ■ . ■ — 



36. YEAR 



JbTaST 



37. VfclHCLE MAti£„ 



U,Ra*J 16. Serf 



J7, Doieof 3inh 



Dtonto — — 

Auto Tlochnrdc ' ; . 



23* Soc- Sec. No*.. 



24.iUrj25.Sct 



29, Htif/U . po.Wt^ht 

~23.~~5oc»Sec.No... * 



2?- Height 



30- Weight 



41. LICENSE NO. - *2,LI5 



IAKJE "fIOI5B£L ~~ 



21 



TTlTV" 



1£ 



(31. Hair 



5 



19. STYLE . . 



447^EHi^Lt ViAlUi 



> 



^o^i wrt laying cr t t hair lojft aic3 jj^mfc Ic^r nrd Tort f n£^ 

u hirii fadlcatoo tint cnimli vgtfa rtoci V e^T^it^o . This ^'s n ^ 

in tha ?qttem otr catao gutiXatlcaa, ^ho^j two f^rr 'z^-ir o ld n^ Uv^ co--a r-d > > r : 
_<tcwi mwaLrsataly > daja when gsngg round than. Pinkish hlood Surm 



46- CRDUNAL DAMAGE ANtOUNT 

5 aoo.oo ^/ 



Stolen 



Rt cohered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



OFFICE EQU1F>^ES: 



CONSUMABLES 



JLWtLK f 



TV. RADIO, Etc. 



LIVESTOCK 



FIREARMS 



OTHER 



HOUSEHOLD 



TOTAL 



52* RttOVfcR£D PROPER! 
Stolen Locally-Recovi 
Stolen Loolly-Recovi 
Stolen Other^lecovet 



54- DA^^^^^SfPAR 



.* * / ■ ' . ' : < > 1 "V - ; 

■ ; ■ " £ j Acti^ * | jcuued py Arot I [ unfounded, Expbin # > / - % / ^.ji^." 

[ExceotenilJyattied, Explain ■ '< v ^V"^ * ' . ^ " ; " / " " *\ * % - 



|E xtep tionaUy 




S7 V AFPR0VINC OFFICER (Soutur^Jk Number) - - 



0 



3. INCIDENT TYPE 

V Cattle KiutLLatLm 



6, I'itEMiirn ^atic 



4 _C 
B 



Commerce 



Scm« Station 



2: 
, > 



7, INCIDENT LOCATION - v . . . , 



"6ate" 



CEO 

17 



7 *t^JCH 



10- WEAPON TYPE (Ciiclc 



INCIDENT DAlE 

07-12-75 



Tiro 



to 



C\(? ] UNX 



Gun t 2 1 OiHinjTcpl ] 



II. COMPLAINANTS 



12, ADDRESS 

P.O* Ecct 74 AcarxULit, -erf tfesclCD 



14. VICTIM'S NAME ■ 



L5.R*4 

A 



M 



17. Da of Binh 



IILi 



20. OlCOfAllON 



it: 



19. ADDRESS 

Bex 74 iierrrr AzvixdliAy Titrj KercLco 

22. NAME NO. 1 (CifckOnc) FaKE^NT | JU5FECT WANTED 



23. 5oc.5tc.No. 



2<V.Kxr 25, Sat 2 



27. ADDRESS 



28. Af« 



29. Height 



22. NAME MO. 2 ICifcleOnt) . PARENT SUSPECT WlTNfcSS WANTED 



JL. Hue 



31 



TXTiocTSec^NoT 



1 2S. A S e 



ti: 



77. ADDRESS 



29. Hc^ht 



yk t MODEL 



30. Weight bi. Huf 



39. STYLE. 



34. VALUE - pS.COLOR?* 



£ 4d. V1N- 



36. YEAR 



37, VEHICLE MAKE - 



41. LICENSE NO. > P2. liS 



O.LIY 44. VEHICLE Sl'AibS 



4S. 



S to 10 firms ^nd ^ 5 H- vI T-r , i ^^^^ — 



-5J » 



< 



46. GlCMINAL DAMAGE AMOUNT 

s5 co*co 



30. 



5L 



Stotcn 



Rteomed 



CJkRcNCY 



JEViTLRY 



OFFICE EqUIIMENI ' TV. RAPtOȣtc, 



CONSUMABLES 



LIVESTOCK 



CLOTHING 



FIREARMS 



OTHER 



VEHICLES 



HOUSEHOLD 



TOTAL 



52. HE-COVERED FR0PERT' 
Stolen Loc^Jty-R tcovtr 
Stolen LooUy-Recovfi 
S tolen O t hu-R ccover e 



> 



55. CASE STATUS 

Exception *Uy Cfctrod, ExpUbi 



53. da^qoils^: tj^ohtec 

L 



54. DATE PO * Tm RE Pa RJE 



f j QeMtd by Axmt 



^UnfDkind«d F Explain 



56. REPORTING OFFICER (5i{!Uturc& Numb«t) 



57. APPROVING OFFICER (S\ewturo& Number) 



{ 

o 



o 



5- INCIDENT TYPE \. 



7. INCIDENT LOCATION i^/V VW.VrfiS^'^'- :^ v ^ --ri 
r--* ■ * J - & **** -' * * 



X 



6. FrESUSTvEFE (Ctfdr 



2JL 



Service Station 



6 1 



10. WEAPON TYF£ (Circle 



I* INCIDENT DATE: 



.Tuna to ■■ -.; v DATt » fl 



Time 



11. COMPLAINANTS - - 



IS ] ( NO) j 



X 



J2. ADDRESS 

Gen p ol Pulcg/ iter >i «ieo 



Gun [ 2 T CiUtwsTool^ 



191 



14, VJCTLM3 NAM£ 



16. Sol 



17. Drte of Birth 



ill. DCCCPTmOB 



IB.- 

75 



1*. ADDRESS - w - 



7T 
75; 



22. NAME NO. 1 (Ci*cl* One) 7 PARENT ~ SUSPECT TFITKEZS WANTED 



23. Sot See^No. 



24. ft**l !*.£=£ 



27.ADDR£SS- 



2&, Age 



29. iirtthi 



30. Weight 



3i. hill 



22, NAME NO. 2 (Circle Odo) . PARENT SUSPECT ..WITNESS WANTED 



ii. Soc, Sct.W 



24-K-vi 



2$. Age 



IS. Sex 



21. ADDRESS 



■ ■ 



H 
> 



34. VALUE 3j.C01.0A .., 



36. YEAR 



> 



40. V1N - 



29- Height 



37, VEHICLE MAKE 



41. LICENSE NO. 



30- Wright 



MUDhL 



pi, JUir yni 

39. tfl'YLE 



a + us PITuy 



44- VEHICLES 



TATur 



g u g rem £tg=£ old cro33 Koroford g.ntl KIacIc Angag rrvtivo opvr w^n^ .foy y i l-ivin^ cm 



l^Jt nigj vith rocrt^D^ 3*?:c or:?j: n ,- t^rvrog^ nrA cgxg r c r^avocl* Pin kiah W.cort from 



' T h ic]i indicates that it ^gg liTtcri *snc droor^l bnc> to thg Trour\i : K-JS rtr 
rr.d imgor the ggu v;i3 goTt and ghgwgd i^dvatqticn^ sro the coV/i.tojt been clron-c 



GOO ^grdg i^on rj^a cotf w^r& tho iJ* circular indentations similar to tho nn-TS 



la which jhg X grg bc^STU Zrrrzl^mlr tha ^niral^ Sad 



<6« CRIMINAL DAMAGE AMOONX 



50. 



51, 



Stolen 



U 



Rc cowed 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



CURRENCY 



JEWELRY 



OFFICE EQUIFMENT TV g RAD<0 , Etc. 



CONSUMA3LES 



LIVESTOCK 



CLOTHING 



IRE ARMS 



OTHER 



VEHICLES 



HOUSEHOLD 



TOTAL 



52- RECOVERED PROPERTY 
Stolen Locally-R«o*CT 
Stolen Locadly-RtcovtE 
Stolen Othe^RecOTCtei 



55, CASEStATUS 



53- DATE OFFENSE REKJRIEU 



6 



-a 



54, DATE REPORT r-RtPARfc 



| ^ "|ActiT« y* f'j Clcirwl by Arrest ; ** j ^jUitfoundtd, Explain 
ExicptiorLiUy Cleared t Explain " 



56, REPORTING OFFICER (SigDAture A Wumbcr) 



57. APPROVING OFFICER. (Sip»tiwe % & Humi)a) T^" 



p, INCIDENT TYTE - , ^L^&^^r 

..■ Cattle Mutilation.. ••.'* ' i.-C 1 .. .;;'.■'•:■■*...■ 



6- 



: s I L 

1 ' l] Ufa 

* - I i" Co 



6- PHi,Mj>L i f?E (Circle 



Strocx Station 



f- 1, INCIDENT LOCATION \ i-; v VV V"' -V, 

j5 hslcc, Kc^ i:c^e^^^^ 



°17 1 



JO, WEAPON TYPE (Ci«l* 



IK COMPLAINANTS y* - ^v;^r- ^"f ; V-^ - ^ v 



J 2. ADDRESS 



I*, VICTIM* NAME i - ^ ~ ■ /. a-:* ~ ~ ; " r77— 



A 



II | 07-39-23 



IT 
73= 



is. 

717 
75< 



19, ADDRESS . . „ v * ^ . % fc . 

?* 0».Cox 37ZV- -Eulca, 3- ■ 



22. NAME 



NO. 1 (Cucia Dnt) ™ PARENT,- SUSPECT ^WANTED 



27? ADDRESS -c-..- .. H y \?^»- v .« '^.V >V- 



22. At* 



22. NaMENO.2 (CbtteOfte) ^.PARENT : SUSPECX ^WITNESS . WANTED ... v 
2 T. AP 0 RESS ; : ^ „ * ■ ■ ; * ^ „ * - ; : * v. .' r .. v. |2B, Afi« 



VALUE 



ll> VIM 



36. YEAR 



VEtMCLE MAd.^ t ; 1 



23* Soc.Stc.NQ* c% f 



* * i_ * ■+ - 



29. Jictfht 



li. MODEL 



JO. Wviiiit 



T£ 

Si; 



35. STYLE 



45. 



sa5?.i 


BO-..--*. - 


~|Salt/Hfg j *| : *om. ^ [ ■ ■ 




CURRENCY 


JEWELRY 


CLOTHiNC 


V1WJCLES 






S 


5 ■ ■ 




Rccomtd 






* 5 






OFFiCEEQUIiMt>- 


TV, RADiO t ElC - 


FIREARMS 


HOUSEHOLD 


Stolen 


5 


S 


J 




Recovered 


S 


. s 


S 






CONSUMABLES 


LIVESTOCK - 


OTHER ■ 


TOTAL 


Stolen 


S 


% 


S 




Recovered 






% " ' 





52. RECOVERED PROPERT 
Slate* Locally -Recover 
Stolen L&c^ly-Rtcqvri 
Stolen 0lhcf4lecover« 



55. CASE STATUS 

■ V 

f Tf iActiw »*vS.7 J f laeif ed by Amit ]?. 



53- DATe OFrZXSE REPOKTtE 

4-24-7S ' ■ ' | 7 



54. DATE REPORT PREPARE 
7-31-78 ' ■ V ; 



5S, RKTORTING OFFICER (Si^ture A Number) 



CWIES: I Whit^ Pink, Golden -ACENCY ...VeUow- STATE (UCR) 



57. APPROVING OFFICER (SipntuieA Numbtr) . 



- - — ( . . . . - • K ) 

K ACCNCY- ^ - ; : J i ^ rV : - 'Vi^/?:; • ■ V ? ;t ; , I O R I NM 
V XftU Vftrfcn Sfc*£a- Pali eft:'/??.:* V.* _ 



, 3- FILE NUMBER 

"I r 



: "s." narrative 4-26-7B**t;7:3*> 'A'iC'tbia writer va© coatsctfcd by Kr* Kanca! Cn-cr, Dolce 
*•*?■ H- Jt* in rt f er coca * to an elrv» rsonth old cross Herford-Charolais bull be lochias to' i 
bod apparently been cutll sated***' Investigation sbawed that this eleven cocth old bull " 
. ■ ■ • dropped by soo& type of aircraft gorth : of Xr+.'Gcr&T. f s rraach houi« . (approximate ly 6 CO 

* ■ The recto^'sr^ i^^crgans hr*d b«a reserved with a abzrp scd/p«cis** iatrnssssit^* Tbe 

■• ■ i _ « 

*•*•■*--"•.•.«••■*,»■. • ., . # •■ . * -*_..■. • . . 

boms hgd:V! sn beea .rearawj^-^JThg ball sustained .Tls^blft bruLcis aroesad tlra brlsVet cr 

** 3fe^r^f.i337rtOL icdicAtar that a strap was used tx> lift* and Icwer tifcss cai5Kl"to kzd' froci tb 

■ -* jiixcraf trl V* Tbci'bcil* r^poercd to nave beca daad'for about 3 jir** ?rinta ^3ze frnicd 1C 

T nor£Vo£"tbc slaLa aalrvtl^Vlbestt 4" c! latter round footprints Isid to the "cainal ~ aisd 

;'V l°9 * £?Zi&exB tbey appcxrntly ratumed to a ; boveritig alrcrcf tJ/ The^lisprtots VjTpeorod 

•V- bif <Hilta* heavy" sircA tljQ 'ground vca dry cad hard ctad ^utsmiblle tire tr^ch^ frba thc- 



J^-*" polica:c«*wre "barely v •> !VV 



/ • Tb^o * lr*iprint 3 ( 2- c >pC-- v x3<t to bave scrap* d Lha* jjrc^jr.d they boved* :j- Tha liver rr-d 
* beart of tb-Ls aolsiusi t?«3 removed by vriter»" 3otb the liv*r r^d heart vcrc vhitc *md* 
*2-x»3Ky^ !l*3oth orS3n2r bad the toarture apd ccnsi3tcrocy of peanut butter^ .f*Tbc carctio vaa 

ccbycratud* * Tfco bcart van t^kca to the Loa A I awff Kedical. laboratory to be .-analysed 
"*■ t>.e liver v« takctr to 2 different private laboratories for esoexia atloQ > ' ] The Los A Is 
/ ircdicallLsborst cry returned a. f itullns "oa the beaxt*. (Heport attacked) >* : • r - r ^ 



X LOS * L^OP-ATnaX ; 



Eoco Pras^entj So'riicrcstcopic changes of slsnilf icaace wrd found :/ 
^^■^Lao SBy crr3cy""SBPcr i ^sn3yC s s*ar*»ax^r3 ss srrcrscss^ MPssscscirtViS csssttos s?ctyc 
• * : ^ # . : \ «jsc la 'fibers t»ere jtea. Hoscle fibers also contained c 



9. RZJCOVERLD PROPERTY 



10. 


CURRENCY 


JE^XLRY- 


CLOTH fNG 


\TH1CLES - 


1 piOKn ovier*r\cc 
OFFlCf EOLHPSIFVT 


t>vere<a Loni 


Stolen 






$ 


% 






Rsccvered 


5 






S 


s 


$ a 




*. FIREARMS 


HOUSEHOLD 


CONSUMABLES 


LIYT.TTOTK ' 


' OTHER 




Stolen • 


$ 




$ ' 




s - ' 




Rtcoyere4 


5. 


$ 


S 






s 



11. CASE STATUS 



Aghro | jClwwl by Amat - r ? j Excgptioaally Qeired ' | lunfoumfcd 



J - i^W^lNG WiTCER (5yjMtui»i Number) - * ; - v ..- * 14^ APPROVING OFFICER (S«uture & Number) vv ^ 



12. REPOR 



"agency^. . ■ r ^T~Z^r:. •■ - loiuUtW 
ocv y5e=rfco- Stcte Police : ' : ^ r ** % *' - * 



* 3.FILENTJMSFR 

, .v?:;;;^ rj «;supplemehtal report ' ^ "^page Vn F ' ,? 

g> Narrative Bg^tcrlolcrgyg "A, specimen obtai ned frag s boxsrt chraber v« «ralt3Tw ©ad 
; — % ~ ' " [55532 E3 cS5E2I3 a Z53^HSp53 5?S3SX55 XS55ExrI£3 55 UZSS 
■ ' - ' - r * " m * species. Definitive: classification wis sot raatfe. 



4 7b* liver v=s checJigd against ! a healthy food Tgsrfrat liver vbich show* e different 
4 r=jci.l^tcd .bull's Utot. Tfce hull's liver contained do e£pp6r»' sad 4 cLcmri the acroi 
phcaybaroiig, xiiac > aod potassim^ l?To cspljiiastioa for this, coodit loir i* available 

* ... - a m . rrr 1 . .• . ! " r~T! * ♦ - : ^~tt 

" psrarent ti3C„-;A group of microbiologist* sre.cwrarias thtcfc ohftorarilitiesV . X 

Sf the privrrLc^Laba are bgfag trithhel* b ut^if cbough' evident* La foirsd" prosecute 
; \ - njrag o£ ttesg-l^rssarieg uil l he xslcwadj; "ALw the blood vMcfc e^re of f of the 
hcfctvben It pr^&vrr^^bly dro??od ll£kc ?lak in color". --This hio=x! did aoc c 



nf£fisr several dsy3.- Thar hide, en rher ntalra brittle Ctod felt: to touch UfcdTcsiic 



?*ip«.>* Tlc^v te-deTTsoath tha tilde va3 pinkiab in color. A probsblo explain* ticn'fc 
t>: ntlsH Mood ia^coatral' ty^e of radiation.' tx&sd to JtLtl tlae" snissal/ McoriSiiffl ^D 



1-4 



ira €Kc?ar»— • Tba red corpulJIc:) desLroycxi leaving tJie p.ilo p JnUinh col^r-. : A3 
tD::icoI»«r/ fir^Ilrrgx on blocd errs no^ativc h^ cause of tho. disa Lninctioa erf this radl^ 
* It i* believed tb^t chls type of rodiatieir is not hacaful to hvtrwr^; although. 



*p?rox±n*tety 7 pecpla vho visited the rsjtilc.tieCi site cocrplaincd of stsuso* ^nd 
However, thia writer luia hrf no A\jch ^yiDptc» aftaar checking proximately 11 exit 11 
' izi the ?*st A cscmtb^ ; ^ ■ y v ; T> v ■ ^ V " /; > 

• Thar ccly trapes to thi^ retilAtioa nite ia- throrsh Cc«^ f 5 frcat y^rd- 



vt^biclo seen or he^rd enteri^ tbo p^tivre^ 7h& slaia ball ves la^i: *4cn at op 
proxi=*t*lx S:00 pa en A-23-73 snd ^ppa^rod healthy at this tie*. E<wver r a Mr/\Ji 

9. RECOVERED PROPERTY ^ i TT^ " % 

| } Stolra LwaQy R ecovcrr d LocdJ y [ Stolen Locj^arcowed Otfrrr | Istol»n othrr Recpyei^ Lo< 





CURRENCY 


IF*VELRY ■ 


CLOTHING 


\THTCLES 


OFFICE EOUtPMrvr 




Slokn 




I 


S 


5 


$ 


S 


Rocmr rrej H 


L * 




s 


5 


$ 


5 ; 




FIREARMS > 


HOUSEHOLD 


CONSUMABLES ' 


UVT^Torv 


flTHFtt 




Stolen 


$ ' 


% 


$ 


3 








$ 


s 




S 




1 




| .^Ki^o6r/cEIliS«B.*«* Number) , ... .... . . • • j*- AWROVJNC Dl 

7 - '^UoJt.--'^i-f^ytUJ\f^>^^/^ 



OFFICER (S^tinn & Number) 



COPIES: White, pink,-C*>W«i^ ACENQY V*tio» - STATE fllCBI — 




r^) heard a ten* flying airerert ln the vi-elsity of vbere tJie rairlLctcd bull ww^ 



^ap'proxf «7i<?rely 13 xailea 2&st of Dulcfir on Junfi 13,. 1976 vMch ~lso Involved one of Kr 



■ ; -Manual Ccsaes:** cc t tiff . - • Ixrycs t lotion, of dsesfc.stranse mutilations have beca Ucsipen 
/* inability to find laboratories^ vblch. vlll pfcrfom testa sxl report accurate finding: 
- TMs vTlter y*s* : f ortimatc cno™*** to have ftoiid this wtilatieo cbcrrtly «cftcr it'ece: 
; Iri-rc tb*rri . ciscd » rraln^ I s *£r£;£o\mA- only cays- cr irr*5:Sra after ?=itiloticm_ „* : It ts.vritci 
v ;*^'laics>- tb c£ " tbesa '* crilsili la Suave* i^^a ^r. sect for tiro before tbay" trrs. sitilstsiS 

■"* " r : <~;^*Al6<> -ir^dt^ssti«*sbcrys that dll zinc tin Ciena «re to native cattle- /fltt'Kio Ac 
- - ' " Cjxnaty «rrrcxfcstcly : 15,CCQ fc^nd of 3t3&rs i~ ported frosi .\rincn^, I^:cico r Taxes;* etc 



" - h:r^ not bc^rr* :»tilr.tDd*V: It vriter's theory tl:*it these r-nl^nls itra- plcliu'l. up by 



olrcrrift^ ^tilet^'cloe-lierc* ^2x1 returned scd dropped frca aircraft* - This. Is inrli< 

froa bruised sn*r:3» aod broken bones o*t - • I- '.^""f \ 

* . * Identical TsutllsEticna fcrrv* boar* tnStios place alll over the Smifchv«t. It ta si 

- " J • . . 

.■■•**."■ ' 
thct no «^er vltacsses to tieae Incidents ba^/e ccos fcr^axd or that x» ctcciScota cr 1 



; hairo ocraxed* - Oaa b» to sdalt U^it vhoever is xespaasi^la for tht purt i,at±oma la 1 



: ' 

veil organised with bourxlless.tftcfaaolo^ ^tnd financing nad secrecy. 

- - - - . 



J • „ I^rfttsr Is- -presently getting, c^tipcaont: thengji the efforts of i2r. Ecvard Utir^csaj 



cirjuarnoe, E. X* to detect OTbstsncea osz th^ cattle pbtch mlg&t aarfc ttum snd bo pli 

^ RECOVERED PROPERTY 



Sicken .• 



JO. £ 



"7 Stolen UKalfr-Rccovercd Locally | ^tolcn Locally-Kecovgred Other * I f 



CURRENCY 



/EW-ELRY. 



CLOTH INC 



VEHICLES 



OFFICE EOtflPM^VT 



T.Y,-B*r 



Recovered 



FIREARMS 



HOUSEHOLD 



Stolcxs 



CONSUMABLES 



UVT.TrOTK. 



fTTHTR , 



VTTfi 



Reco*=r«l 



11. CASE STATUS 



V 



* .... * < 12. REPQR 

Owed riunfoonded ■ ' • j / 
^APFROVINC OFFICER (Stgnaturv & Number) ^ # — ' 



^.^F. 5 !: >Vh:tr. Pink. Gnldcs ACf^NCTY. . . . Y*»n*^rriTC ria-u* . 




*m -ell 



I of Hr/'Corez^s cattle i=» the neag futcre-* Assisting la this Invest! Ration ia 



Jfa'STrfjFCT Mexico C^ttls Sanitsry Bonrq irr.d Kgv.Hwrrd SuTEcss r -Al^wpKirque» !I- M 



_ » T- - ' .* ^ — *■ * V " J \ ^ 





- - : " - ■. 














■ * ■ ■ % ■ \ 




* " *- 














^ * ; ^ v. -\ :j 


















3- RECOVERED FROPERTY ^ ^. . . /r., p ■' - m - 
* '"' ; - # | 1 Stolen Local^ Rtroverrd LocdJy . j ^toUn Locrfy-Rccoverrtt Other 


1 " IStoltnolhcr Kecmcrrd Laairy" 


10. 


CURRENCY 


^ JEWELRY - 


CLOTUiyC 


VEHICLES 


OfTlCEEOUlPMFNT., 




Stolen 


5 


S 


t 


$ 


I ■ 


s * 


Recorcrrd 


5 


f 


s 


J 


* 






FIREARMS 


-HOUSEHOLD 


CONSUMABLES 


LPiT.rrorK * 


,-„- OXHEH. ' 




Stolen 


s 








S- _ • »»» 




Recovered 


s 




5 * 


s 







ii* CASESTATUS v y ; 8 .,y ■ ■ »-^V— > V ^ 

| 3CT^TJKC ^FricEft (S^iur* ANuW)_ . " ~ ^ ^ ^APPROVING OFFICER <Si^tui* A Numb*)—- ^^^;V 



[ [ptccptioaal^aewd j [unfounded " ^ ' V ' | 



■UNIVERSITY OF CALIFOp\IA 



LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABC 
(CONTRACT W-7405 ENGO6) 
P.O. BOX 1663 
LOS ALAMOS. N£W MEXICO S7545 



ORY 



IN RtPLY 
KEFERTO: 
MAIL STOP: 



H-DO 
881 



May 9, 1978 



Officer Cabe Valdez 
New Mexico State Police 
Post Office Box 212 
Dulce, New Mexico 87528 

Dear Cabe: ■ > 

Examination is now -complete on the tissue samples from the recent incident at Dulce. 
Microscopic and bacteriologic studies were performed on three specimens consisting of 
heart muscle, skeletal muscle, and a bone fragment. 

FI NDIN GS 

(1) Ha art Muscle : No microscopic changes of pathological significance were found. 

(2) B one Fragment : Ko microscopic changes of significance were found . 

(3) Skel etal Mu scle: Rod-shaped bacteria infiltrating connective tissue betveen 

muscle fibers were seen. Muscle fibers also contained occasional S arcosporldia cysts. 

(A) Bact eriol ogy : A specimen obtained from a heart chamber was cultured and shown 
to contain a rod-shaped organism identified as Clostrid ium species. Definitive classi- 
fication was not made. 

ZNTKKFRETATIOX 



!] No definite conclusion can be drawn from the observation of bacterial infiltration of 
" musclu since the infiltration could be post-mortem. The demonstration of Cl ostridium 
in the heart chambers similarly cannot be definitively ascribed as pathological 
because of the potential for contamination. While the findings are not inconsistent 
with a diagnosis of infection, the possibility of contamination prevents the conclusion 
that infection was the cause of death. The observation of Sarcosporidia cysts is not 
remarkable and could be seen in roost beef animals from this region on careful examinatioi 

I doubt that you will find these observations helpful in your investigation because the 
bacteriological examination is inconclusive. However, we will support you in any way we 
can, and you are welcome to visit our laboratory to discuss your findings at your 
convenience* The offer for instrumentation support also remains open. If ve can be 
of further assistance, please call. Warm personal regards. 

Sin^ereljs^yours , 



DrP:ES 



Slope rel^vours , 

Donald F. Petersen 

'Alternate Health Division Leader 



An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer 



:Tcw y*>rxico Stats 



5. LNCiDENT TYPE 

Cattle Mutilation 



a 



3. f)L£ NUMBER 



r 



6. TKEMliL i t Tt <Cusit Or.: 



Cha:: 



Conunerec 



Service S Li tion 6 Jiin< 



7. INCIDENT LOCATION 

3«lcc, Set? r>Trtra >: 



8. INCIDENT DATE Tune to 



"daTT 



GEO 

17 



7 rasch 



9. IOiIUaNU T K 
YES | X NO | UN* 



10. WEAPON TYPE (Circle Ont 



Gun 1 2 | Cutting Tcolj 3 \ 



csd c tc mi uc d 



II. COMPLAINANTS 



12. ADDRESS 
?. O.. 3cx 372 > Dulc*. H. H. 



li.PH 

759- 



14. VICTIM'S NAM£ 



19* ADDRESS 

P. O- Sox 372, ' Palce, K 

22. NAME NO* I (Circle One) PARENT 



16. Sec 17. Dons of Birth 



07-09-23 



U.Rn 

753 



20. OuLUHaiiON 
rancher 



759- 



SUSKCT " WirSKW WANTED 



27. ADDRESS .< 



28. A*e 



22. NAME NO. 2 (Circle Ooe) PAKJENT 



27. ADDRESS 



SUSPECT WITNESS WANTED 

! 128. A&c 



34. VALUE 35. COLOR 



36. YEAR 



VLS ; 



37. VEHICLE MAKJE 



23. Soc Sec. No. 



l5T Height 130. Wn*ht 



13. Soc. Sec. No. 



29. Height 



30. Wei-ht 



24.fUx 
JL Hau 



25. Soc 



26. 



31. Hiir 



39. STYLE 



4I.LICENSENa fc2.LlS |43.LlY~l44. vTHKTcTS i aTU? 



45. 



46. CRIMINAL DAMAGE AMOUNT 



4 7 . ujKI ilQLU D 5CB 1 AME T 
Sale/Mfg j T| : Po«*. 



SO?? 
3 



31. 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Stolen 



Recovered 



CURRENCY 



JEWELRY 



S - 



OFFICE EQUlfMKS' 



TV. RADIO . Etc. 



CONSUMABLES 



LIVESTOCK 



CLOTHING 



S 



FIREARMS 



S 



OTHER 



VEHICLES 



HOUSEHOLD 



TOTAL 



52. RECOVERED PROPERTY 
Stolen Locally -Recover* 
Stolen Locally -Recover 
Stolen Other-Recover t<3 



53. DATE OFFENSE REFQRIH) 



to 



55. CASE STATUS 

FTl Active 
Exceptionally Cleared, Explain 



54. DATE REPORT PREPARE 



| jCleared by Arrest 



^Unfounded, Explain 



56. RETORTING OFFICER (Signature Jt Number) 



57. APPROVING OFFICER (Signature St Number) . .... 



COPIES: White. Pink, Golden - AGENCY . Yellow - STATE (UCR) 



- ; J":; [jj 5* ORIGINAL REPORT Q 6. SUPPLEMENTAL RETORT V." 7. 'FACE p nF 

narka17VE ^ 6-iV73 X "-^3 cor.tastad V/ ?4r» Kggggl Cores at 2*sn TV*, T-r-yr~»~«» 



T2I 



Ida with tcngsa and sex orrrsna nrocisebr T^?>^f?^. 



Finnish KLood Irora he— rinse vaa rl?^V!,g ?yj j>2 ^^ r t. zLr^b v ^"^ 



c1*»~t> Dr Tice bad been fastened." inn-rinter ^^^^ 



* 



brajEtrg j off* irr^tho grcut:d» This r-olz^J 1^1V2 i 2 ***" Z^zz^ izzzzzzdzziLzO-^ \ ^ v ^--^ -- 

d v-cc"ST>c^^i for ■*c3t3C- 8 '•'Tl^is 'writer ''5*5^0 Svl --^-r^^ 1 ^t A r->'-t"T -.M^> ^ - > ^ 

r-^r y^r oli cc'J3 a^d 3 t'JO ~ao!i"i old hcifam % ^r^ ^ i^*.;^ n ^ ^ — - 

— -■ — 

the larfc fc rar^rt oC their body, sVx?le3 qT t^ f^.or^^gyt nsra ^-^^ x ^ ^ 

nj- £ orlTOta Xzbor^tory At the tirs nf tjs3 ^.M. ^^. ^-n v -"^ 

" — ■■ * ■ * - ^ 

. \ ** . - ' * ■' ■ *. 



9- KLCOVEK- 


ED PROPERTY 


itotm LocaJtf-ReccYerad 


Locdtfr | ' ^tolfft Lc 


fcCtUy-ft *cdv rrn3 Other 


OFFICE FOUIPV^NT 


o*tfud Less 


SifrTfrn 


CURRENCY 
% 


JEWELRY . 

J 


CLOTHING 

* 
S 


\THJCLES 

S 
S 


S 


z 
$ 


Steles 


FIREARMS 

S 


HOUSEHOLD 

S 


CONSUMABLES 
$ * 


I 

S 


% 
S 


Iff 

s 




5 


5 


1 




■ ^ 


12. REK 



11. CASE STATUS 



Acti^ ^ ' 'I jOcOTd by Aff«t _^ j £xccplw»i*]ly Owed *| junTcwiiided 



14. APFROVING OFFICER (Siputur; 4 Number) 



( ! - . 



I. AGENCY.; ? -.V lORlO" 

v^^n s*»*y Pni - . : . . ■ •■ 



07 



3. FILE MJM ft pr 



8. NARRATIVE*??* 



that vbocypr ±3 ro-srenaifrle for thsse raitilaticna is operating c*rfc gf n j 
T^asrcoveT truck van vhich heavily Vuarded,, Tfris van* G7it>r>^3&dlT carriea tS 
craTt which operate* within a 13 rdle rsdius^ This mtes it » rather diiYicuit : 
irrveatlg^tla^ officers to personally vitnosa or fincf circa to these gitilatl:~: 
axtsa where tha iratilatiorrs occur ig 'c^irgfully' analysed vca'^q iu ggy^nca» * Thou 



hsvo teen car!^d years in advance for rsiiilaticn. 



■» -Assisting in '^ia Anvcsti^aca is Cattle jbspector Jirn 7^~j and ' Cfflscr Tfa 
Johcatcgty !Te;/ i'cxlco Ca?W rcrl ?ish # ' " *' 



* ---- 



S. RiXOVERED PROPERTY 



Stoteo Loo^»Ricovewj Locally } ^toVn LocaUy»Reco»ersJ Other 



JO. 


CURRENCY 


Jr^ELRY 


CLOTHING 


VEHICLES 


OFFICE EOVffMEST 








s 


S 


$ 


* 


n— 


Recovrred 




X 


$ ~j 


$ 








FIREARMS 


HOUSEHOLD 


CONSUME T ^ 


LrvrttTnrir 




TOj 


S:o3cn 


J 


1 




$ 


$ 




RscovcrcJ 


J 


S 


$ 


S 


5 1 


$ 4 



, 11. CASE STATUS 



12. REPO 



~, * • . . - # . . * 

* [X]Actfre .1 ^ 1 fae»m!byAneit 


n 


» ^ - — * — — 
Exceptionally Clewed | (unfounded * I <" _ . 


ictn>Rnr»G 0^1CER,tS«niluri A Number) . ■ t 




14. APPROVING OFFICER (Siputux* A Number) - ■ 'i\ V - 


ro^f r. r ,: Wh!.Tc. TL"Jk. .G-!i^R • AGENCY. YcUo* • 5TATE (UCR1 



i 



6 1 



.HARRIWI fSTKMlTT 
CX*CO 

" CO** M ITTT * OH COWMVRCIT. 

COMMtTTCt ON VAKKWQ. 
NOUflNUt AND L'HftAH ArrA1?*t* 

MUOr OOMM1TTCC Off LTW:CT* 



TKCuttcb ^Ictfcs Aerials 

WASHINGTON, 3.C, 10! 50 



December 21, 197S 



The Honorable Griffin B, Bell 

Attorney General 

Department of Justice 

10th and Constitution Avenue f N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20530 

Dear Mr. Attorney Generals 



During the past several years, ranchers throughout the West 
including my horr^ state of New Mexico, have been victimized 
by a series ct cattle mutilations. As a result, these ranchers 
have as a group and individually suffered serious economic 
losses* 

Ifcese mysterious killings have been the subject of at least £ 
two articles in national publications, copies of which are 
enclosed* Kr, Ccckburn*s article in the December 1975 issu^^; 
of Ssquire states that there had been a federal investigation- : 
into this matter, cut it was dropped. Mr, Cockburn implies f; 
the investigation may have been terminated because cattle _^ 
mutilation per is not a federal offense. 



9 



While an individual cattle mutilation may not be a federal 
offense, 1 am very concerned at what appears to be a continued 
pattern of an organized interstate criminal activity. Therefore, 
I am requesting that the Justice Department re-examine its 
jurisdiction in this area with respect to the possible reopening 
of this investigation. 

Enclosed are copies of my files on this subject. While awaiting 
what will hopefully be a favorable reply, X shall continue to 
gather materials that could be of help in such an investigation. 
If you need further information in studying this matter, please 
do not hesitate to contact me. 

Sincerely, 



Sincerely, - 



HStjri 
Enclosures 



Harrison Schmitt 

RECEIVED 



|0CPARTMEN7 Of •" ::yfsj a | 
V. 23? DEC 28 1973 ! 3v 

CHi.,!ixAL DIVISION ^ ^^^^^'^^^^ 



January 31, 1979 



SUBJECT: Steer nutilation, January 29, 1279, 
Torrance County r KM - 



Serjeant O'Deil of the Torrance County Sheriff's Dep&nx.ent called the 
Albuquerque Office early in the afternoon of Janu&ry 29, 1979, to report 
that he had discovered the first reported cattle mutilation in Torrance 
County, and wanted information on vhes he should report it to, 5FD0M called 
O'Dell ajjd vas told the following: 

In response to a telephone call froa Sasaauel X. Hindi, C'Dell arrived 
at a location near the vil^soe of Eur an, ICS, at apprcxi«tely 11 a. is, on 
January 29 , 1979, end found the carcass of a sLx r^onth old steer that had 
apparently been recently autilated. o f *>ell said the carets vas still vara 
enough to celt the sncv around it, 0'I>ell indicated that he had been following 
news reports of previous sutilations in Rio Arriba County and believed that 
the Torrance County cutilation vas the •"freshest 1 " ever discovered. Be called 
because he thourht it would be helpful for investigators to have a fresh ruti- 
letion to c-x*^ine and subject to tests* 

_0'Dell said the steer's scrotum ajid penis had been rer^ved with surgical 

precision — a feature cc— on to all previous mutilations — and indicated 
that patches of hair around the carcass seesed to indicate that the steer 
had been cropped or bounced another feature cei^ron to all previous mutilations. 
The steer's intestines had been removed through the hole where the scrotvn had 
been cut out, but were not disturbed, OT-ell felt that an ajiinal would have 
cone directly to the intestines. The steer's tongue vas not reaoved as in 
previous mutilations, but the insides of the ears appeared to have been 
"beveled 1 " out with a sharp instrument, 

O'Dell notified the state Gs^e and Fish Dapartsent, the State Police Crine 
lab in Santa re, and the Kew Kexico Livestock Board* The State Police Crin4» 
Lab apparently notified State Police Officer Gabe Valdez of ChasA, the officer 
vho hes investigated r^ost of the mutilations over the p-frst 13 months* In the 
interim, the Livestock Board reroved the carcass And apparently froze it* Valde2 
later contacted the Torrance County Sheriff and was to <have gone to Torr^ce 
County on January 30 to investigate. 

In response to your question about whether any of the autilations 
have occurred on^f eceral^l^ nd^ Officer Valdez Moms ne that eight autilations 
vera discovered on the Jicar illa Apache Keseryation,^ and seven on the Santa 

Pueblb^_ The re have ^T7T^«VlTSr~65"^t t le ~pu t i 1 at i ons , an cTTix 
horse mutilation si reported in Kev Mexico since 1975. Forty-five of the 
cattle nvtilations and four of the horse eutilations occurred in 1978, 



6 



•mOMAi. FORM HO. t* 
JULY f»7J COmON, 

UNITED* STATES OOVERNii^NT 



Memorandum 



y Director / 1825 

TO . Federal Bureau of Investigation 

• 3 PBH:ALH:RCA:mac 



frou u/I^Assistant Attorney General 



rati Philip B. Heymann 

sis tan t At to me; 
iminal Division 

subject: .-Crime on Indi^-*Reservationa; 
vi f / ^ Mutilation of Animals 



L 




Attached is a portion of some correspondence 
received from Senator Harrison Schmitt indicating that 
15 mutilations of animals have occurred in Indian 
country in New Mexico in the past three years. For 
several years the Criminal Division has been aware of 
the phenomenon of animals being mutilated in a manner 
that could indicate that such acts are performed by 1 
persons as part of a ritual or ceremony. The report that 
some of the mutilations have occurred in Indian country 
is our first indication that Federal law may have been 
violated* 

It is requested that the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation conduct an appropriate investigation of 
the 15 mutilations and any others that occur in Indian 
£ country as a possible crime on an Indian reservation and 

£ furnish the results to the united States Attorney and to 

£ , the Criminal Division, attention: Roger c. Adams, 

I General crimes Section* Mr. Adams has additional infor- 

mation which may be of assistance to the FBI concerning 
previous cattle mutilations over which there was no 
Federal jurisdiction. 



Attachment ■' 



V 



[CD 

CHCLOSURE 




bjjww _ ... 



FD-36 (£rv. S-23-78) 

TRANSMIT VIA: 

□ Teletype 

□ Facsimile 

□ AIRTEL 



FBI 



PRECEDENCE: 
n Immediate 

□ Priority 

□ Routine 



CLASSIFICATION: 

# 

□ TOP SECRET 

□ SECRET 

□ CONFIDENTIAL 

□ UNCLAS E F T O 

□ UNCLAS 

Date 2/16/79 




TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 
FROM: SAC, ALBUQUERQUE 
\UNSUBS; 

flSATTLE MUTILATIONS^OCCURRING 

' m Western states 

CIR - MISCE L^KEOUS^ ; ^ ^ ^ ~ y 

Tor the past seven or eignT years mysterious-cattle 
mutilations have been occurring throughout the United States 
and for the past four years have been occurring within the 
State of New Mexico. Officer GABE VALDEZ, New Mexico State 
Police, has been handling investigations of these mutilations 
within New Mexico* Information furnished to this office by 
Officer VALDEZ indicates that the animals are being shot with 
some type of paralyzing drug and the blood is being drawn from 
the animal after an injection of an anti-coagulant. It appears 
that in some instances the cattle 9 s legs have been broken and^r^ 
helicopters without any identifying numbers have reportedly J^JL^> J 
been seen in the vicinity of these mutilations. Officer y — 
VALDEZ theorizes that clamps are being placed on the cow's legs 
and they are being lifted by helicopter to some remote area where 
the mutilations are taking_place and then the animal is returned 
to its original pasture* The mutilations primarily consist of 
removal of the tongue 9 the lymph gland, lower lip and the sexual 
organs of the animal* Much mystery has surrounded these 
mutilations, but according to witnesses they give the appearance 
of being very professionally done with a surgical instrument, and 
according to VALDEZ, as the years progress, each surgical procc 
.pp..r. to b« more ^Mj^j^M&^fc* 



that in no instance, to his kndwTSdge, •«« thefieT fcarcASTseB «tever 
attacked by predator or scavenger animals, although there are, 
tracks which would indicate that coyotes have been circling *Ue. 
carcass from a distance* He also (Mhtised that he has requested 
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory t***ronduct investigation*/^^ 12 J 7q 
him but until just recently has always been advised that the t* 
mutilations were done by predatory animals. Officer vattie? 
stated that just recently he has been told by two assistants at I 
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory that they were able to determine 





Transmitted 



(Number) 



(Tim) 



Per 



AQ 

the type of tranquilizer and blood anti-coagulant that 
have been utilized* . . 

Officer VALDEZ etated that Colorado probably has the 
most mutilations occurring within their State and that over 
the past four years approximately 30 have occurred in New 
Mexico* He stated of these 30, 15 have occurred on Indian 
Reservations but he did know that, many mutilations have gone' 
unreported which have occurred on the Indian reservations 
because the Indians, particularly in the Pueblos, are extremely 
superstitious and will not even allow off icers in to investigate 
in some instances. Officer VALDEZ stated since the outset 
of these mutilations there have been an estimated 6>QQ0 animals 
mutilated which would place the loss at approximately $1*000,000. 

R* E* THOMPSON* United States Attorney, advised that he 
had received an urgent call from the head of the Criminal 
Division, Department of Justice, advising him that he would be 
contacted by Senator HARRISON SCMMITT of New Mexico, who had 
been in contact with Attorney General GRIFFIN BELL in an effort 
to obtain Federal assist aire in seeking to solve these cattle 
mutilations. 

Bureau telephone call of 2/13/79 advised that a letter 
was forthcoming from the Department to the Bureau requesting 
our assistance in the investigation based on the fact that IS 
of these animals had been mutilated on Indian reservation 
land, 

On 2/15/79 /Senator HARRISON SCHMITT, USA R. E* THOMPSON* 
SA SAMUEL W, JONES and myself met /to discuss this matter. 
It was «reed that a conference should be held in April of 
this year in Albuquerque involving New Mexico and the surrounding 
States who have suffered cattle mutilation cases in an effort 
to fully discuss this matter to determine what has been 
developed to date and to recommend further steps to be taken 
to solve this ongoing problem* The role of the FBI was 
discussed but was not established since it was not resolved 
whether the FBI would act in a coordinating capacity, JV 
an investigating capacity or both* It was decided however, 
1 that it would be most beneficial if all this available infor- 
mation could be placctd in a computer bank so that appropriate 
\ printouts could be made and an aba^ysis made in an effort to 
" determine a trend or patrterh of these mutilations* 

It is obvious if mutilations are to be solved there is 
a need for a coordinated effort so that all material available 
can be gathered and analyzed and further efforts synchronized. 
Whether the FBI should assume this role is a matter to be 



- 



6 



AQ 




decided. If we are merely to investigate and direct our 
efforts toward the 15 mutilated cattle on the Indian reser- 
vation we, I believe, will be in the same position as the 
other law enforcement agencies at this time and would be seeking 
to achieve an almost impossible task. It is my belief that 
if we are to participate in any manner that we should do so ; 
fully, although this off ice and the USA's office are at a loss 
to determine what Statute our investigative jurisdiction would 
be in this matter. If we are to act solely as a coordinator 
or in any other official capacity the sooner we can place 
this information in the computer bank, the better off we 
would be and in this regard it would be my recommendation that 
an expert in the computer field at the Bureau travel to 
Albuquerque in the very near future so that we can determine 
what type of information will be needed so that when the 
invitation for the April conference is submitted from Senator 
SCHMITT's Office that the surrounding States will be aware 
of the information that is needed to place in the computer. It 
should be noted that Senator SCHMITT's Office is coordinating the 
April conference and will submit the appropriate invitations 
and with the cooperation of the USA, Mr. THOMPSON, will chair 
this conference. The FBI will act only as a participant. 

Since this has not been investigated by the FBI in any 
manner we have no theories whatsoever as to why or what is 
responsible for these cattle mutilations. Officer GABE 
VALDEZ is very adamant in his opinion that these mutilations 
are the work of the U. S. Government and that it is some 
clandestine operation either by the CIA or the Department of 
Energy and in all probability is connected with some type of , . 
research into biological warfare. His main reason for these 
beliefs is that he feels that he was given the "run around 9 * 
by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and they are attempting to 
cover up this situation. There are also theories that these are 
cults (religious) or some type of Indian rituals resulting in 
these mutilations and the wildest theory advanced is that they .. : 
have some connection with unidentified flying objects. S V 

* :lv ;!".* :c * ' v-v.V'^-- 

If we are to assume an investigative posture into this 
area , the matter ~of manpower , of course , -becomes a consideration 

' and I an umable to determine at. this time the amount of manpower - 
that would be needed to give this our full attention so that 
a rapid conclusion could be reached. 

The Bureau is requested to furnish its comments and 
{guidance on this whole situation including, if desired, the 
j Legal Counsel's assessment of jurisdictional question. An 
/early response would be needed however, so that we might 
t properly | if requested to do so, obtain the data bank — 
information. Ir it appears that we are going to become 

-3- 



(. 

o 



o 



AQ 



involved in this matter, it is obvious that there would be a 
large amount of correspondence necessary and Albuquerque would 
suggest a code name be established of BOVMUT. 





*: SAC, Albuquerque 
Director, FBI 

.15 ANIMALS! _ 

eifi- — • 

00 i Albuquerque 



3/6/79 
1 - J. E. Smith 



ReAQairtel, 2/16/79. 2 

Enclosed for the Albuquerque Division is one copy 
of a memorandum from the Department of Justice (DOJ) dated 
Karoh 2, 1979, and attachments. 

In »l*h enclosed memorandum, the 

Albuquerque Division is instructed to conduct an anoiwwiafc* 
investigation into the 1ft mutilations of animals which were 
performed on Indian reservations within the state of New 
Mexico, After the Albuquerque Division conducts a preliminary 
investigation into these mutilations and it is believed that 
placing information into a computer bank will be of investi- 
gative assistance, at that time the request for same should— \ 
be submitted with full Justification. FBIHQ, upon r^ceipTT^ 
of additional information from DOJ, will forward same.V^^ ' 

FBIRQ should be kept apprised on a timely basis 
the results of investigative efforts. 



Enclosures - 3 




r MAlLfeb.33 
. *!AR 7 1979 



MAR 13 1979 




SEE NOTE. PAGE 2 



t 

Airfcel to SAC, Albuquerque 

RE: THE MUTILATIONS OP 15 ANIMALS 

generally ritualistic Jnv«??«J?r b H" eha ™ct«*iz ed as 
Jurisdictions have been n^!?^! 1 ? 6 e f forts ^ various 
New Mexico has taken IS iKElS'in ?Z &t ° T ^J* 1 " from 
has been in bcaitSt wSh thl SSj ln routila ^°ns and 

from DOJ, ma " er ln accordance with the enclosed memorandum 



4" ^ 



- 2 - 



< I 
0 



o 



FD-36 if^"^2^m 

TRANSMIT VIA: 

□ Teletype 

□ Facsimile 

a 



f 

PRECEDENCE: 
I I Immediate 
1 I Priority 
Q Routine 



FBI 



AIRTEL 



J 

CLASSIFICATION: 

□ TOP SECRET 

□ SECRET 

□ CONFIDENTIAL 

□ E F T 0 

□ CLEAR 

4/25/79 



Date 



TO; DIRECTOR i PBI 

FROM: SAC, ALBUQUERQUE (198-541) (P) 

SUBJECT: THE ^SuTILATIONS OF 

15 ANIMALS' ~ i 
CIR (C) 

OO: ALBUQUERQUE 

Re Bureau airtel to Albuquerque , 3/6/79. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are three copies of an LHM 
captioned "Cattle Mutilations" , dated 4/25/79. 

A conference directed by Senator HARRISON SCHMITT, 
New Mexico, and U.S. Attorney R.E. THOMPSON , Albuquerque, , f 
was held on 4/20/79, at Albuquerque. This conference was'' ^ 
opened to the public and was attended by law enforcement/ 'if 
officials from New Mexico and other states, the news medij^\/ 
and interested persons. Approximately 180 persons were xtr^ 
attendance. During the conference, Senator SCHMITT stated 
that the FBI had been designated as being in charge of cattle 
mutilations. He explained to the conference attendees that 
he had conferred with Attorney General GRIFFIN BELL regarding 
the matter of federal involvement in cattle mutilations and 
that the FBI had now received the authority from the Attorney 
General to conduct such an investigation. Senator SCHMITT 
stated that in the past the Federal Government had not 
entered into the eiwrcggigation .because it felt it did not-*"""* 
have jurisdiction^' ^ /0 l/^ \ 




Approved: 



Prior 
CIDDIO, Senator 
New Mexico, tha 
from its head^j" 

{"j^ Eureau t Enc 3) 
^""2-Albuquerque 

SWJ/sg j (>') 




_S 

e conference it 'was explained to WAYNE 
ITT's Administrative Aide in Santa Fe, 
FBI in Albuquerque had received swtnnrity j 
to conduct investigations into cattle 



(RAM) 




jr ±lz*& 



ABM? 1979 



Transmitted 



(Number) 



(Time) 



Per 



cV 

m 



AQ 190-541 



mutilations occurring on Indian lands, but that its investi- 
gation was limited to these mutiliations. CIDDIO said he 
would insure that Senator SCHMITT was apprised of this 
limitation* This information was given to Mr. CIDDIO on 
4/9/79. . .... ; v . : 

^ During the conference, FORREST S. PUTMAN, Albuquerque 
FBI, explained that the FBI's jurisdiction extended to mutilation 
occurring on Indian lands. Re said, however, that the FBI in 
conducting its investigation of these mutilations would take 
into account mutilations occurring elsewhere which showed 
a similar MO. 

The jurisdictional problems of all law enforcement 
officials investigating mutilations were discussed during an 
afternoon session of the conference attended only by law 
enforcement officials. It was pointed out that in most cases , 
the mutilations amounted to misdemeanor violations and were not 
a felony. As Senator SCHMIxT pointed out during the general 
conference that the FBI might have jurisdiction to investigate 
mutilations because of violations of state laws on Indian 
lands , the question arose whether this would be a felony or 
a misdemeanor violation. Under New Mexico State Lav, the 
mere muti list ion of a dead animal would be simply a misdemeanor 
violation. Investigation of these matters would not be in 
keeping with the FBI *s current efforts to concentrate on 
priority matters. 

The Albuquerque FBI recommends that FBIHQ point 
out to the Justice Department that if the FBI is asked to 
conduct investigation into cattle mutilations of which the 
FBI has no jurisdiction, we will be opening ourselves to 
criticism similar to criticism we have received in the past 
for investigating matters wherein we have had no jurisdiction. 
It would seem appropriate that if FBI participation in investi- 
gation of .cattle mutilations is desired by the Justice Department, 
effort should be made to secure Congressional approval or an 
Executive Order through which the appropriate funds could be 
authorized and proper jurisdiction, granted to the FBI. 

Under these conditions, the FBI could approach this 
matter without expectation of undue criticism and with the 
anticipation that the proper resources could be utilized to 
conduct an effective investigation. 






AQ 198-541 

If the Albuquerque FBI Office is expected to broaden 
its examination of the cattle mutilation , additional manpower 
would be necessary* The scope of the cattle mutiliation problem 

Its f hd TTn 4 ±a A Q4»*4»aa 4 a aaawjI A s V 4 mm ^.*-v ^^L/] 

future investigation would be so broad that the manpower 
currently assigned to the Albuquerque Office could not cope 
with the problem. At the present time, the number of 
additional Agents necessary for such an investigation could 
not be estimated by the Albuquerque FBI Office. 

Reairtel authorized the Albuquerque FBI to 'investigate 
the mutilations of 15 animals which have reportedly occurred 
on Indian lands within the State of New Mexico. Further 
investigation of these mutilations is an impossibility because 
of the fact that the carcasses of the animals have been destroyed 
The only purpose which could be served in making inquiry about 
these matters would be to compile a record of what investigators 
have determined in the past. It is expected this would be an 
extremely limited record because those who have looked into 
such cattle mutilations have done so without any jurisdictional 
authority and their records are expected to be very brief, 
if any at all were kept. 

The Albuquerque FBI Office feels that if an investi- 
gative unit is approved and an LEAA Grant is given to the Office 
of the District Attorney in Santa Fe, New Mexico, this approach 
to the solution would probably be the best in the absence of 
full FBI jurisdiction. Such an investigative unit would have 
jurisdiction over investigation of the cattle mutilations and 
authority to prosecute persons responsible for the mutilations 
if they are identified. The FBI could cooperate with this unit 
by furnishing data available to it for assistance in its 
investigation. The Albuquerque FBI feels that if the grant 
is given to the District Attorney's Office in Santa Fe, 
coordination of investigative efforts could be handled 
appropriately*.; > V 

During the afternoon session of the conference 
attended by law enforcement officials/ it was concluded by 
U.S. Attorney THOMPSON that a 'decision would be made whether 
the FBI, the New Mexico State Police, or the special unit 
attached to the Santa Fe District Attorney f s Office would be 
the coordinating agency for the investigation of the cattle 
mutilations. U.S. Attorney THOMPSON said a decision would be 
made within two weeks which of these three agencies would be so 
designated depending upon approval from FBIHQ, the New Mexico 



AQ 198-541 



State Police, and the granting of the LEAA funds. The 
Albuquerque FBI does not recommend that the FBI be the 
coordinating unit unless the FBI is given full jurisdiction 
to look into all mut illations by either Congress or Executive 
Order. . ■ ; - " - ■ 

An article appeared in the "Albuquerque Journal 11 
on Wednesday, 4/25/79, captioned "Santa Fe DA to Coordinate 
Cattle Mutilation Probe*. The article states the Santa Fe 
District Attorney f s Office was awarded $44,170 in grant money 
to coordinate investigations of cattle mutilations. This 
award was made on Tuesday, 4/24/79. According to the 
article, the grant application received the backing of U.S. v; 
Attorney R.E. THOMPSON and the FBI. 

The Albuquerque Office of the FBI recommends that 
the investigative unit to be set up with the grant money be 
designated as the coordinator for cattle mutilation investigations. 
The Albuquerque Office would maintain a liaison with the investi- 
gative unit and cooperate with it in exchanging data and restrict 
its investigations to those cattle mutilations which might 
occur on Indian lands in the future. 



6 J 



o 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

, Pimm Mtr m Albuquerque r New Mexico 

April 25, 1979 



CATTLE MUTILATIONS 



On April 20, 1979, a conference was held at the 
Albuquerque Public Library at Albuquerque, New Mexico. This 
conference was chaired by Senator HARRISON SCHMITT, Republican, 
New Mexico, and United States Attorney R.E. THOMPSON of 
Albuquerque. The conference convened at 9:00 a.m. The morning 
session was attended by representatives from various law 
enforcement agencies, news media representatives, and the 
general public. Approximately 180 persons attended the 
conference during the morning session. This session lasted until 
approximately 12:00 noon. 

Senator SCHMITT opened the conference by explaining 
its purpose. He said, "This hearing is to define the scope 
of the problem and the basis_ for federal assistance and to 
examine how the FBI might be involved." U.S. Attorney R.E. 
THOMPSON explained to those attending the conference that 
federal jurisdiction for investigations conducted by the FBI 
is limited to those areas approved by Congress. U.S. Attorney 
THOMPSON said there is a possible violation of a federal statute 
requiring that aircraft be appropriately marked and identified. 
He explained that this statute might possibly have been violated 
because of reports that the unidentified aircraft have been 
observed in the area of cattle mutilations. 

Senator SCHMITT explained that his staff and others 
have searched the federal statutes and have concluded there 
is possible federal jurisdiction under Title 18, U.S. Code, 
Sections 7 and 13, having to do with violations of state law 
on Indian or federal lands. Senator SCHMITT expressed his hope 
that the FBI could conduct investigation into the cattle 
mutilations under these statutes. Senator SCHMITT stated to 
the conference that the FBI would coordinate the investigation . 
of cattle mutilations. _ _ _ 



This document contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and 
its contents are not to be distributed outside 
your agency. 




CATTLE MUTILATIONS 



FORREST S* PUTMAN, Special Agent in Charge (SAC), 
Albuquerque Office of the FBI, explained to the conference 
that the Justice Department had given the FBI authority 
to investigate thoee cattle mutilations which have occurred 
or might occur on Indian lands. He further explained that 
the Albuquerque FBI would look at such mutilations in connection 
with mutilations occurring off Indian lands for the purpose 
of comparison and control, especially where the same methods 
of operation are noted* SAC PUTMAN said that in order for 
this matter to be resolved, the facts surrounding such 
mutilations should be gathered and computerised* 

District Attorney ELOY MARTINEZ, Santa Fe r New Mexico, 
told the conference that his judicial district had made 
application for a $50/000 Law Enforcement Assistance Admin istr at ioi 
(LEAA) Grant for the purpose of investigating the cattle 
mutilations. He explained that there is hope that with the 
funds from this grant, an investigative unit can be established 
for the sole purpose of resolving the mutilation problem. He 
said it is his view that such an investigative unit could serve 
as a headquarters for all law enforcement officials investigating 
the mutilations and, in particular, would serve as a repository 
for information developed in order that this information could 
be coordinated properly* He said such a unit would not only 
coordinate this information, but also handle submissions to 
a qualified lab for both evidence and photographs. Mr. MARTINEZ 
said a hearing will be held on April 24, 1979, for the purpose 
of determining whether this grant will be approved. 

GABE VALDEZ, New Mexico State Police, Dulce, New Mexico, 
reported he has investigated the death of 90 cattle during the 
past three years, as well as six horses. Officer VALDEZ said 
he is convinced that the mutiliations of the animals have not 
been the work of predators because of the precise manner of 
the cuts. 

Officer VAIDEZ said he had investigated mutilations 
of several animals which had occurred on the ranch of MANUEL 
GOMEZ of Dulce, New Mexico. 

MANUEL GOMEZ addressted the conference and explained 
he had lost six animals to unexplained deaths which were found 
in a mutilated condition within the last two years. Further, 
GOMEZ said that he and his family are experiencing fear and 
mental anguish because of the mutilations. 




CATTLE MUTILATIONS 



at Libre School in Farasita, Colorado, exhibited a map of the 
United States which contained hundreds of colored pins identifying 
mutilation sites* He commented that he had been making a 
systematic collection of data since 1975, and has never met 
a greater challenge. He said, "The only thing that makes sense 
about the mutilations is that they make no sense at all.* 

TOM ADAMS of Paris Texas, who has been independently 
examining mutilations for six years, said his investigation 
has shown that helicopters are" almost always observed' in the 
area of the mutiliations. He said that the helicopters do 
not have identifying markings and they fly at abnormal, unsafe, 
or illegal altitudes. 

Dr. PETER VAN ARSDALE, Ph.D. , Assistant Professor, 
Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, suggested 
that those investigating the cattle mutilations take a systematic 
approach and look at all types of evidence is discounting any 
of the propounded theories such as responsibility by extraterrestri 
visitors or Satanic cults. 

RICHARD SIGISMUND, Social Scientist, Boulder, Colorado, 
presented an argument which advanced the theory that the cattle 
mutilations are possibly related to activity of UFOs, Numerous 
other persons made similar type presentations expounding on 
their theories regarding the possibility that the mutilations 
are the responsibility of extraterrestrial visitors, members of 
Satanic cults, or some unknown government agency. 

Dr. RICHARD PRINE, Forensic Veterinarian, Los Alamos 
Scientific Laboratory (LASL) , Los Alamos, Hew Mexico, discounted 
the possibility that the mutilations have been done by anything 

kt^ ** r\^n4 El a bb4 j4 tus lix j3 avhth j civ niT'n* s bac 4 n 

his opinion predators were responsible for the mutiliation of 
all six. 

Dr. CLAIRE HI BBS , a representative of the State 
veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Sew Mexico State University, 
Las Cruces, Hew Mexico, said he recently came to New Mexico, 
but that prior to that he examined some mutiliation findings 
in Kansas and Nebraska. Dr. HIBBS said the mutiliations fell 
into three categories: animals killed and mutilated by predators 
and scavengers, "animals mutilated after death by "sharp instruments 
and animals mutilated by pranksters. 



-3- 



CATTLE MUTILATIONS 



TOMMY BLAND, Lewisville, Texas, told the conference 
he has been studying UFO activities for twenty-two years and 
mutilations for twelve years ♦ He explained that animal 
mutilations date back to the early 1800 ! s in England and 
Scotland. He also pointed out that animal mutilations are 
not confined to cattle, but cited incidents of mutilation 
of horses, dogs, sheep, and rabbits • He also said that the 
mutilations are not only nationwide, but international in 
scope. 

Other speakers at the conference suggested ways of 
approaching an investigation into the mutilations, urging 

individuals. 

Chief RALEIGH TAFOYA, Jicarilla Apache Tribe, and 
WALTER DASHENO, Governor, Santa Clara Pueblo, each spoke 
briefly to the conference. Both spoke of the cattle which 
had been found mutilated on their respective Indian lands* 
Governor DASHENO said he is concerned as to the extent of 
the jurisdiction by investigating agencies into the matter 
and Chief TAFOYA said some of his people who have lost livestock 
have been threatened. He did not elaborate on these threats • 

CARL W. WHITESIDE, Investigator, Colorado Bureau of 
Investigation, told the conference that between April and 
December, 1975, his Bureau investigated 203 reports of cattle 
mutilations. He said in addition his Bureau conducted an 
under cover investigation in an attempt to resolve the mutilation 
problem. He said during the investigation by his Bureau, numerous 
pieces of evidence were submitted to the Colorado State University 
Large Animal Hospital and all civilian and military helicopter 
flights were monitored during this probe. WHITESIDE said, 
"Sadly, most of these efforts produced no results." He said 
they were unable to place any unidentified vehicle in the air 
or on the ground near the carcasses that were found. He said 
his group submitted 35 carcasses to the laboratory for examination 
Only 19 of those submitted were deemed to be of recent enough 
vintage to make an examination and of those 19, nine were deter- 
mined to be willful mutilation's. He said of those nine, it was 
concluded that two were done by pranksters. WHITESIDE said 
that his organization even set up a secret witness program with 
the cooperation of the Denver Post", but this resulted in no 
information to assist in a solution to the matter. 



CATTLE MUTILATIONS 



During the afternoon of April 20 , 1979 , law 

enforcement officers met with U.S, Attorney R.E. THOMPSON 

for a special meeting. At this conference were representatives 

from the FBI and numerous state law enforcement officers from 

New Mexico. Also in attendance were investigators from Nebraska/ 

Colorado, Montana, and Arkansas. During the conference emphasis 

was placed on an attempt to determine the most appropriate way 

of approaching the solution of the cattle mutilations. The 

officials decided that direction for the investigation should 

be the responsibility of one of three agencies — the FBI, 

the District Attorney's Office in Santa Fe, New Mexico/ which 

has applied for the LBAA Grant, or the New Mexico State Police. 

U.S. Attorney THOMPSON concluded that within the next two 

weeks a determination would be made which of the three agencies 

would be the primary investigative group and the agency's 

responsibility for the collection of data regarding the 

mutilations. U.S. Attorney THOMPSON pointed out that the 

FBI would have to receive approval from Washington, District 

Attorney MARTINEZ 1 group would have to receive the LEAA Grant, 

and the New Mexico State Police would have to obtain clearance 

from its headquarters. 
* 

During this session of the conference, investigators 
from Arkansas pointed out ;that they have examined 28 cases of 
cattle mutilations and it is their conclusion that all cases 
were the work of intentional mutilators and not of predators. 
The examination of carcasses submitted by their investigators 
have been done by the Oklahoma State University Forensic Lab. 

The investigator present at the conference from Montana 
expressed his opinion that carcasses found in Montana were also 
mutilated by deliberate efforts and not by predators. 

All investigators present during this session recommended 
that there be a central collection unit which could coordinate 
information from all areas. Also, all investigators recommended 
that a standard procedure and form be adopted for the investi- 
gation of future mutilations. They recommended that evidence 
be examined by a qualified veterinary pathologist. 



b' 



O" 



Airtel 



J 



5/2/79 





To: SAC, Albuquerque (198-5*11) 

From: Director, FBI 

lAlLATIONS OF 

IXMlALS 

CIR (C> 

00 i Albuquerque 



1 - J. E. Smith 



Re Albuquerque airtel to FBIHQ, V25/79. and 
Butelcal to Albuquerque, 5/1/79. 

FBIHQ concurs with the reoommendation of SAC, 
Albuquerque In that the Investigative unit eurrently being 
established re cattle mutilations within the PA's Office, 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, be designated as the eoordinator Jat-this 
matter . ^> 

t 

NOTE: Re airtel recommended that the coordinator for the 
various Jurisdictions involved in the investigation of cattle 
mutilations will be the DA's Office, Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
FBIHQ concurs with the recommendation. 





LsfsJ C#M. 

Haa* 1 Uif . - 

t-cMe-t,^ 

S Te«*. lent, f f fff 

FeUltAtfi. Off. 

TeUfltMs ti, 



. *» MAY 3 1979 ^ 



MAELROOU 



8 



"UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 




subject: TIffi_K3IXLATI0NS OP 
^15 ANIMALS 

— CRIME ON INDIAN RESERVATION 
/ 00 : Albuquerque 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 



date: 6/1/79 

1 - Associate Director 
1 - Mr. Boynton 
1 - Mr, Moore 
1 - Mr. Ingram 
1 - Mr. Gow 
1 - J. E. Smith 

2> 



Ckf AD A4«~ 
0*, AS fa 

A i it. DIf 




Mlk Afh.OH. 
Ttftpk**. It*. _ 




PURPOSE: To respond to the Director's request for Infor- 
mation concerning an article appearing in the "National 
Enquirer" newspaper dated June 5» 1979* page 5, which is 
captioned, "FBI Joins Investigation of Animal Mutilations 
Linked to UFOs." (See attached.) 

RECOMMENDATION : None. For. information. 



APPi 



Dlr*ctO 



Assoc. Or, 
Oep. advIti. 
Dep. AO Iriv, 



A dm Se'v, 
Crim. Inv. 

Ld Donatory 



Le^af Couh. 

Pi*n b Jt |f>ip t 

Tech, Servi, 

Py&tic Affs;oif7 




DETAILS : By memorandum dated March 2, 1979* Philip B. Heymann, 
Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, requested that 
the FBI conduct an appropriate investigation in New Mexico of 
the fifteen animal mutilations and any others that occur in 
Indian country as a possible Crime on an Indian Reservation and 
furnish the results to the 1). S. Attorney and to the Criminal 
Division, Department of Justice (DOJ). This memorandum 
stated that DOJ had received correspondence from Senator 
Harrison Schmitt, New Mexico, indicating that fifteen mutilations 
of animals have occurred in New Mexico Indian country in the 
past three years. In this memorandum, DOJ advised that their 
Criminal Division had been aware of the phenomenon of animals 
being mutilated in a manner that could indicate that such 
acts are performed by persons as part of a ritual or ceremony. 
This memorandum from DOJ further stated that some of these 
mutilations which have occurred in Indian country are DOJ's 
first indication that Federal law may have been ¥ 4 * lc ts4'**? 



closure 





! : i JUN ^1979 



CONTINUED - OVER 



on the Payroll Savings Plan 



Memorandum Gow to Moore 

RE: THE MUTILATIONS OP 15 ANIMALS 



On March 6, 1979* the FBI, Albuquerque Division, 
was instructed to conduct an investigation into the mutilations 
of fifteen animals or any others that occur in Indian country 
in accordance with the aforementioned DOJ memorandum dated 
March 2/ 1979 . 

On April 20, 1979 > a conference was held in 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, concerning the problem of animal 
mutilations, primarily cattle, in which approximately 180 
people attended who included various law enforcement agencies 
from several states, news media representatives, and the 
general public. Senator Schmitt chaired the conference and 
the U. S. Attorney, New Mexico, and SAC Forrest S. Putman, Jr., 
Albuquerque Division, were in attendance* SAC, Putman advised 
the conference that DOJ had given the FBI authority to investi- 
gate those cattle mutilations which have occurred or might 
occur in Indian country. During this conference, numerous 
theories were expounded concerning who is responsible for 
these mutilations including members of satanic cults, predators, 
pranksters, extraterrestrial visitors, and some unknown 
Government agency. At the conclusion of this conference, it 
was decided that one agency would be designated as the 
coordinating investigative agency for all Jurisdictions 
involved . 

Subsequently during May, 1979, the District Attorney's 
Office for the greater Santa Fe, New Mexico, area received 
approximately $50,000 in LEAA funds to act as the coordinating 
investigative agency of cattle mutilations. 

Since March, 1979, there have been no new cattle 
mutilations in Indian country, and our investigation with 
respect to the identities of the individuals responsible for the 
fifteen cattle mutilations has been negative to date. 



I 



FBI Joins Investigation of Animal Mutilations Linked to UFOs 



%i WILLIAM MLHHIU, Mt MUTT **4 DAVID WftHSHT 

The rB! uii joined in ihe isvesiisalicss of &be falsam mutUsUsss of 
thousand* of crating horses and cattlt over u 16-atate jrta — attacks which 
have been linked lo UFOs, ta L ' V ■ 

- Disclosure of the FBI role was made at a recent conference of officials from seven 
suit* .where the attacks have reached aa atanninf level 

• Sen. Harrison Schmftt <B.-N. Ilex), tbeex-estroneut and idealist who ergsnJzed 
the conference, declared; ^Either we've got a UFO situation or we've got a massive, 
massive conspiracy which is enormouely well furiML" 

At least 0,000 cattle and horses have been butchered with surftcel precision over an 
estimated 1 mUitan square mile area stretching from Tennessee to Oregon since the 
mutilation* began around LOTS, The \M million square miles is more than a third ofthe 
tola) land area in the con- 
tinental United States, 

In many cm the stuck* 
have coincided with U FO sight- 
fogs. Battled investigators say 
the strange patten of the 
mutilations Lnctutlei time star- 
tling facts: 

• No tire mark*, (ootprintsor 
other sign* of human activity 
ere found near the mutilated 
carcasses . 

• Only the blood and certain 
pans of the animal* — usually 
the reproductive organs — are 
removed. ■ 

a Thky element* found on 
and in tome carcasses art the 
same as thaw- ejected after a 
VrQ sighting in New Merino* 

a Buisard* and coyotes re- 
fute to eat I hr mutilated h or a ia 
and cattle 

Sen Sefcmitt, who received a 
Ph.D. in geology from Harvard 
University ana was a member 
of the Apollo 17 mooO'landlrtf 
crew\ said state and locaJ law 
enforcement of Ikislt have been 
unable lo come up with leads on 
their **-n and FBI help Is 





' Those arc' their enact words 
. . i The 'star people' know what 
they're doing and should be 



UPPUMQ In^arrrs ho*e OWrrad In 16 states* 



"To dale, the mutilations 
have been as mysterious m 
they've boon grisly," he sild. 

"The Justice Department au 
thorucd I be FBI office In AJbu 
eue.ro.iw to become involved in 
the invest if niton or 
crime* on the basu that aeveral 
of the mutilation killings ec< 
eurred on Indian kinds," 

Many attack* have occurred 
on antmaii al (he JkSrUia 
Aua'chft Reservation In Duke, 
glue*. 

"Any place *r*iC bad a 
rmnibriion. we have also had 
I'FO Mfhiings." reported Gsbc 
Valdai, a veteran New HesLco 



has 
m SO 



state 

veatigeted 
tacks. 

If predators are involved, be 
" we have some predators 
with super powers. We And 
these carcasses are beinj lifted 
up (otf the ground) .and inter 
they leave damp marks on the 
legs. It Is also vary hard forme 
to believe that a predator can 
take the heart out of an animal 
through a small wound in the 



animals and lake diem back to 
the spaceship. 

"There have been thousands 
of these mutilations nobody 
knows about, The Indians are 
usually frightened to -death." he 
said. 

nrney oon i say anything 
about tt because they snow tt'i 
being none by jtsr people/ they 



fXPUTS; New Mexico stare trooper Gob* Voider tokos 
tissue, sompfes from a mutitotod cow found at Dutcs, N, 
,Mm, Assisting hkn.*s retired tcJvrrtrtt Howard targes*, 
who's investigated several sirnHor fnoloenH wirhValdei. 

know why they're doing fe. soJUPt) researcher: "Whel lew 
h|0«ea'we have Concerning those 
responsible lor the mutilations 
suggest thai we are dealing with 
weT-equippco\ highly capable 
airborne entities' . , . We are" 
forced. J feel, to the hypo* test* 
that unidentified aircraft are 
the means — UFOs ' 

Te sat in soiviag the mystery* 
District Attorney Eley Mar- 
tinei of*£spanota. N, Hex., is 
seeking a S40 h Doo grant from the 
U.S. Law Enforcement As* 
etas nee Administration. 
- Admitting UFO* are a poesl- 
WlK>\he*a*d: 

"i fnigtR be the UrM diitrfci 
attorney In the country to prose' 
cute an abea from outer space," 



Dr. afontehh aatd he J 
sat aliens from 
apace ire responsible for the 
ettacks end are using the 
animals' oodles as pari ef their 
study of life on earth 

If any other mveetlgsiart — 
police, scientists and UFO re- 
searchers — agree that UFOs 
are the only possible txptgna- 
iwev 

Said Richard Slgtsmund. a 
Boukfer. Colo, 



Dr. Henry Montelth, an engK 
fleering pnysicisi ai ouuis 
Laboratories which handles se- 
cret government projects, re- 
vealed (bat Indians art so tar* 
rifled by the mutilations, they 
bury the carcasses Inunediste- 
br and are reluctant to discuss 
what happened. Evert their nogs 
refuse w go near the ca re s h ps. 

Dr. U ontelth. who has been 
Investigating the attacks stnoe 
they began, said Indians have 
tola him of actually seeing! 
spaceships lend and unload ^ 
"star people" who chase down 




HAfUtftON tCKMITT 
NEW MtfXJCO 

COMMITTO ON COMMERCE. 
ftCfKNCC AND TRANSPORTATION 

com Mrrm ON APPROPRIATIONS 

rooMMirrnoN 




Ultnilcb <£*Utlej$ J&enale 

WASHINGTON. D.C 10SI0 

June 6, 1979 



Assoc. Dir. 

D«d AD Adm^ 

Dep, AD Inv, 

Asst. Dir.: , > / 

Intel 



p:cn. f- hsp. 

Tech. Servs. 

rub!i: Mtiolf. 
Director's Sec'y ' 



Dear Mr. Director:^ 



IS 




As you may know,rERe U. S. Attorney for New Mexico, 
R. E .^Thompson , ftnd I convened a multi-state live- 
stoclMn^^ation! conference in Albuquerque on April 
29. As a result of that meeting. Agent Sam Jones of 
the Albuquerque office of the FBI was assigned as 
the Bureau contact for those individuals desiring 
to report animal mutilations and to organize the 
Bureau's activities in this investigation. 

Please provide an update with regard to the status 
of the Bureau's activities to this point, as well 
as an outline and timetable for projected action. 
I am receiving many questions from constituents on 
these matters. 

In addition, please advise me whether sufficient , 
funds are contained within your present budget to / 
cover projected activities with respect to the 
Bureau's involvement. As mark-up is scheduled 
to begin within the near future An the Senate 
Appropriations Committee, of wh^pji I am a member, 
your contacting me by June 11 as—to whether 
additional funding is required, *vid the amount, 
would be* appreciated. //A — /j *// jf * 

Sxncerely, ' 




Harrison Schmitt 

The Honorable William H. Webster, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
Washington, D. C. 20535 



5 JUN 22 1879 




M JUL n 1379 



6 ! 



i 




1 

i 

-4 

j 




Honorable Harrison Schmitt 

vtutvu Statii SviUitv 

Washington, D. C. 20510 
Dear Senator Schmltt: 



June 19. 1979 

1 - Mr. Moore 
1 - Mr. Ingram 
1 - Mr. Gow 
l - J e E e Smith 
1 - Mr. Mintz 

Attn: E. P. Mosche! 
1 - Mr. R. E. Long 

Attn: L. C. Groove: 



Reference la made to your letter received June 11* 
1979* • copy of which la attached for your ready reference. 



tMm. 



Please be adrlaed that the Department of Justice on 

%» 4 lAfA — -» but — a _ a. * 



In New Mexico of fift»»n ■nima' pknjiiiatlona and any others 
occur in Indian country as a Federal violation* 



that 



Since March, 1979, our Albuquerque Office has 
- conducted an Inquiry concerning the aforementioned mutilations 
and are in contact with other law enforcement agencies 
investigating animal mutilations. There have been bo new 
cattle mutilations reported to us in Indian country, and our 



- w i — 




responsible for the fifteen cattle mutilations has been / t 
negative to date. / j ' jj 

Tour interest in obtaining additional funds for the 
/FBI's involvement is appreciated. However, at this time 

tuffielent funds are available within our General Government 
5 rimes Program to support our Investigation in this matter. 

_ 

t iour constituents, please contact us. 



- eontact «£V W-/oM~ ? 

^Sincerely yours / 



**» Oil.: 1 y 



William, He Webster 
Director 



8 JUN 22 1979 



Crim. bv, 
Meat, 
fctell, 

I secretary 
let el Cava 
flea. A lata , 

Teca. Servi. 

Twisiet 

fettle AH*. OK. ^ 




Enclosure 

AC, Albuquerque (For information) (Enclosure) 



ere *vr\mt? TiA/n? 



Honorable Harrison Schmltt 

* 

NOTE: This letter is written in response to a letter from 
Senator Harrison Schmitt (New Mexico) concerning the FBI's 
investigation of the cattle mutilations in New Mexico's 
Indian country. 

^n-^J^JS?;*. 11 ' 19 l 9 i J ? hn Ryan ' legislative Assistant 
to Sena tor Schmitt, was telephonically advised by L. C. Groover 

fS f i i " De P ut y Assistant Director, Administrative Services * 
Division, that Senator Schmitt 's letter was received at PBIHQ 
^JL^J *i* 1979 • Mr * R y an was advised that the FBI had 
sufficient funds to handle our investigation concerning 
cattle mutilations and that we would advise the Senator the 

■J2S%2£ ?!E< 1 ? V ! St if atl 2 n - T1 »is response has been coordinated 
among the Administrative Services Division, Legal Counsel 
Division, SAC Forrest S. Putman, Albuquerque Division and the " 
Criminal Investigative Division! division, ana the 



\(j APPROVED! j^^^fl&gaicou* 



1 - Mr, Mintz (Mr. Moschella 
1 - Mr. Moore (Mr. Gow) • 
1 - Mr. Boynton 
1 - Mr. Woodby 

June 26, 1010 



Committee on Appropriations 
United States Senate 
Washington, D, C. 10510 

Dear Burkett, 

In your telephone call you Inquired about the livestock 
mutilations problem in Mew Mexico and the actions being taken 
by the FBI concerning them. 

Livestock mutilations hare reportedly occurred In a 
number of states, principally In the Southwest; however, the 
only known mutilations over which the FBI might have investi- 
gative jurisdiction have occurred on Indian lands In New Mexico. 

£L OK bf r>W _cL 




On March 3, 1979, -too "Department di Justice requested the 
FBI to conduct an Investigation in New Mexico oi fWeen.anlnxBU <_ 
mutilatioiifl and any others that occur in Indian country, filnce ' 
March 1979, our Albuquerque Office has been investigating these 
mutilations and Is In contact with other law enforcement agencies 
investigating livestock mutilations. There have been no new live- 
stock mutilations on Indian lands reported to us and our Investigation 
with respect to the Identities of the individuals responsible for the 
fifteen mutilations mentioned previouslv has been negative to date. j A 

Too may also be Interested to know tn^DAprf^Jn?, I9T9--. — . » 

w 0k * conference chaired by Senator Harrison Schmitt, New Mexico, 

b*. was held In Albuquerque concerning the problem of livestock ■* J,JU 2? 19: 

f>t». AD l#v, 

NOTE: This information is being furnished in response to a UliphuulL ■ - 

&(-'- 1... inquiry from Mr. Van Kirk on 8/25/79. We furnished the same infor- 

!£» mation tcJBjj^tor Schmitt by letter dated 6/19/79, except the portion 

relating tpjww Albuquerque conference and the LEAA grant about which 

&^ c r.;,.7X^ nator ^* n1 ^ was already aware. /f 3 —ftYf T %- 

isc.Mi«t._L-L ; *" i f 



lock, Seres, 

Tremi«f 

r\W« All».0«, 

TtJtsaeet tm, 

0we*W»aee> MAIL ROOD 





Fwt/POJ 




Mr* Burkett Van Kirk 



mutiUttoM, primarily cattle, which to attended by law enforce- 
ment agencies from several states, news media representatives 
and the general puttie* M the conclusion of ttila conference It to 
decided that one agency would be designated a* the coordinating 
Investigative agency for all JurUdtctloiia Involved, Subsequently* 
the District Attorney's Office for the Greater Santa t% K*w Mexico 
Area received approximately $80,000 In LEAA fund* to act as the 
coordinating agency of livestock mutilation Investigation** 

If we can be of farther assistance la ttds matter, please let 
me know* 

ttncerely yours, 



L* Clyde Groover, Jr, 
Deputy Assistant Director 
Administrative Services Division 



APPROVED: 
Director 



AssO- Dir. __ 
Dep. AD Atfm. 
Dep.ADfnv< 



Mm. Swv, 

Crinr IrtVi 



Intel. ' 




Laboratory 



L«fT3f Coun. 
Ian. 1 tnsp." 

Training 



PiibifcAfft.QK, 



ATTNOFi 



C 1 * 

o o 

UNITEO STATES GOVERNMENT 

A memorandum 

^AjSAp, ALBUQUERQUE (198-541) P 
'/•^BANGED" 

- MUTILATION. OF^ANIMALS ON INDIAN 

i^^OnJ?ewjj^ic6' 7 
XX: -cift (cT 

(00: ALBUQUERQUE) 

TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

Title marked changed to show thrust of investigation 
by Albuquerque Office: Title formerly carried asgfiU TILATIO KS 
OF 15 ANIMALS 11 . 



Re Albuquerque airtel to Director, 4/25/79. 



i' 



Enclosed for the Bureau are three copies of 
an LHU captioned, "MUTILATION OF ANIMALS ON INDIAN LANDS IN ' 
FEW MEXICO", dated as above. _ / 

The news articles which comprise the major 
portion of the enclosed LHM were furnished by WAYNE CIDDIO, 
Administrative Assistant to Senator HARRISON SCHMITT, Santa Fe 
Office. CIDDIO also furnished a copy of a news release from 
Senator SCHMITT which is included in the LHM. It is felt 
that the Bureau should have this information in the event 
of inquiries which might be received. 

Regarding the information in the July 17, 1979, 
news release of Senator Schmitt, the Albuquerque Office is 
of the opinion that investigation in this matter should continue 
to be limited to those mutilations reported as occuring on 
Indian lands within the State of New Mexico as per instructions 
in Bureau airtel, 3/16/79. The Albuquerque Office considers 
this to be the maximum limit of its inquiries. 

Since being instructed to investigate this 
matter, there have been no further mutilations reported 
on Indian Lands In New Mexico. Liaison has been established 
with appropriate law enforcement personel to insure that 
mutilations are reported to the Albuquerque FBI Office. 

(2/Bureau (Enc. 4) BBC-18 ~ ~ " "~ ~ 

V-Albuquerque Q ^ 




r 



, Savings Bonds Regularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 



OPTIONAL FORM NO. 10 
(REV. »-?•) 

OS A FPM R Mt CTH) 1 01 .1 1 ■• 
(010-112 

• ewtim o oust 



( 

o 



) 

o 



AQ 198-541 



Concerning 'those prior mutilations reported 
to have occurred on Indian lands, no law enforcement agency 
was assigned investigatory responsibility and as a result # 
no adequate evidence collection or record making was under- 
taken. The Albuquerque Office has questioned law enforcement 
officers who have been at the scene of the alleged mutilations 
as observers* A few photographs were taken, copies of which 
were obtained* No evidence has been obtained because none 
was collected. In view of this, no further investigation 
will be done regarding the alleged mutilation of the 15 
animals previously reported. For this reason* the title 
to this case was changed showing the correct perspective 
of the Albuquerque Office investigation. 



0 



o 




Im tUpiy. PUam Rwfer to 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 
August 1, 1979 



ANIMAL MUTILATIONS 



On July 25, 1979, WAYNE CIDDIO, Administrative 
Assistant to Senator Harrison Schmitt, Santa Fe Office, 
furnished copies of newspaper articles from an Espanola, 
New Mexico, newspaper, the f, Rio Grande Sun", regarding 
mutilations. 

Mr. CIDDIO also furnished a copy of a news 
release from the office of Senator SCHMITT which was dated 
July 17, 1979. The news articles and release follow: 



This document contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property of the FBI 
and is loaned to your agency; it and its contents are not 
to be distributed outside your agency. 



! i 

/ // - /o/J ' 7 



6 



o 



■They, Weld m fifiwlMMz. 



By GAIL OLSON 

Of the SUN'S 
Santa Fe Bureau 
The county's "freshest" 
mutilation report eo far 
reached State Police 
within five hours of the kill 
last Saturday, but nobody 
came to investigate. 

"2 was really disgusted. 
The news media said 
investigators would come 
as soon as they were 
called/ 9 complained 
Dennis Martinez, who 
discovered the carcass 
"within 300 yards of my 
place/* in Truchaa. 

"It is sad news/' he said 
of law enforcement's 
apparent lack of interest 
in the case, which from all 
reports is a classic. State 
Police called the county 
livestock agent and DA 
Eloy Martinez, but sent no 
officers to the scene. 

His wife Francis, more 
cynical, was nonchalant 
about the absence of of- 



V 

Acial investigators. She 
reported that as of 4 p.m. 
Tuesday, no investigator 
had been seen In Truchas. 

•They don't come here 
very often — not unless 
something is hanging from 
a viga," she explained of 
area ' law enforcement 
personnel and what she 
sees • as their attitude 
about the small mountain 
village. 

Ken Rommel, hired 
through a $50,000 federal 
grant to Investigate cattle 
mutilations in Rio Arriba 
county, had not been on 
the scene as of late 
Tuesday afternoon and 
was not available In his 
office. 

Dennis Martinez said 
the latest chapter in 
• county mutilations lore 
began between S a.m. and 
5 a.m. Saturday morning. 

"I heard the dogs 
barking/' he explained of 
that time, though "the 



thought of mutilations was 
far away from my mind/* 
He explained that as he 
has s number of "open 
fences" that result In 
"cattle going through 
property." The only thing 
he noticed about the 
barking dogs was they 
would "go to the boundary 
of the fence and turn 
back" rather than chasing 
. the cows as usual. 

When he began his day, 
he said, at approximately 
7 a.m., his brother. 
Ernesto 1 Martinez and 
"another Ernesto Mar- 
.tlnez/' the Ernesto 
Martinez who owns the 
property upon which the 
cow was found, were at his 
door. 

"Come and see It/' they 
invited, asking him to 
bring his gun, as wolves 
have been sighted in the 
area lately. 

"The cow belonged to 
Juan Antonio Rael and it 



.was a female," 'Dennis 
Martinez said. 

"I saw what appeared to 
be s mutilation, it had 
little blood which was orjy 
visible where the ton~jd 
used to be. The tongue, r.e 
said, had been sliced at its 
"roots." precisely. 

Right after the viewirg, 
the state police reportedly 
were called. 

The night before kc 
been "peaceful" he 
reported, except for the 
slightly peculiar behavior 
of the barking dogs. 

Everyone believed the 
find to be a good one. as 
they had "come in time." 
Dennis Martinez and his 
wife both said a number of 
Truchas residents had 
reported seeing "orange 
lights" in the sky that 
night, some flying over the 
Truchas cemetery. 

After the authorities 
were notified, Dennis 
Martinez said, "I stuck 



But No Owe Gaume 



around from 7 a.m. until 
2:30, making sure" that no 
investigators were 
coming. 

He admitted he was "a 
Utile bit scared" of the 
mutilation which occurred 
so ne£J his home. He 
explained he had been in 
the Colorado Springs area 
when a number of 
mutilations had taken 
place there. 

"The way its done, when 
you see one, its a little bit 
diiVcrcm", then when you 
just hear about one, he 
explained. " . 

The eyes of the fresh 
cow, he noted, attracted 
attention among ob- 
servers* 

•The villain, he amid, 
•tried to scrape at it," as 
If he or it were trying to 
gei a tissue sample "from 
the while part of the eye/ 9 
The rectal area, the udder 
and the ears were 
removed from the beast 



with surgical precision. 

Dennis Martinez said 
Neil Bockman, a Santa Fe 
photographer and film- 
maker looking into the 
phenomena, appeared on 
the scene. Bockman wrote 
an article for Read Street, 
a news publication, 
recently on the 
phenomena entitled 
"Burgers for the Gods." 

"The case itself didnt 
seem unusual, except for 
the fact that there were 
wolves in the area," Bock- 
man said. He reported one 
neighbor's dog chewed 
•the backend" of the cow. 

He was puzzled that law 
enforcement officials had 
not appeared on the scene. 

U.S. Senator Harrison 
Schmitt Tuesday * also 
expressed concern that the 
investigation was not 
attended to immediately 
by law enforcement 
personnel. 

"I don't blame them for 



being upset." he said of 
the witnesses, explaining 
that he is seeking more 
funding for the FBI's 
study into the problem. 

••That's one reason 2 got 
the language" of a funding 
request recently an* 
nounced to support the 
FBI investigation, Senator 
Schmitt explained. "I 
want the FBI to be more 
deeply involved." 

He said "more coor- 
dinating of local in- 
vestlgations" is needed at 
this time and that the 
"central point of the In- 
vestigation," he believes 
now, should be the FBI. 
though some cen- 
tralization may be 
achieved by the District 
Attorney. 

^My understanding was 
that FBI agent Sam Jones 
.was assigned to coordinate 
law enforcement efforts on 
mutilations," Senator Sch- 
mitt said of his anaylsis of 



what transpired at a 
recent conference of law 
enforcement personnel 
involved in mutilation 
investigations. 

•The fact that the 
District Attorney's grant 
was pursued didn't change 
that." he said further, of 
Martinez's federally 
funded investigation. 

•'Maybe my un- 
derstanding was wrong, 
but my understanding was 
that the FBI would be the 
coordinating agency," he 
said. 

When told that .Ken 
Rommel, the Investigator 
the District Attorney 
hired after receiving a 
grant to pay his solans 
had yet to contact Gabe 
Vaidez. the State 
Policeman who has the 
most experience in in- 
vestigating mutilations. 
Senator Schmitt said 
VaJdcz' experience should 
rymtiffHMt,; mi 9* * •„ - 



( > 
G 



O 



Csatlaaod from Page 1 

prove valuable to any 
Investigator. 

•That doesnt sound like 
complete Investigating,* 9 
Schmitt aaid of the 
omission of Valdez' 
participation. 

In light oi the Uck of 
.Investigation of the 
Truchas episode, the SUN 
has received a number of 
reports from confidential 
sources about 
dissatisfaction with the 
course Rommel's in- 
vestigation is taking. 

Persons who have 
spoken to the Investigator 
complain he is "brusque/' 
or "too flippant/' or he 
doesn't take their ideas or 
their reports . seriously, 
and they'd rather not 
discuss with him further 
mutilation phenomena. 

Other persons express 
fears that not only 
Rommel, but the District 
Attorney and the State 
Police, are working 
together to cover up 
whatever Is behind the 



mutilations, and rumors 
are spreading fast 

"Eloy Martinez went to 
the 8tate Police and told 
them that Gabe Valdes Is 
not to have any part in this 
Investigation," one serious 
Valdes fan told the SUN. 

Another version of that 
.story is that a "muzzle" 
has been placed on Valdez. 

Both stories were denied 
Tuesday by State Police 
Quef Martin Vigii and by 
the district attorney. * 

"I have not put out any 
orders to that effect," 
Vigil said. He explained 
that he has asked that 
information be channelled 
to Rommel, but if a state 
policeman should get a 
call on a suspected 
mutilation, he should "go . 
on over there." 

The district attorney, ! 
too, denies the existence of i 
a gag order on any state 
police officer. ♦ 

"I never have, and . 
never will. Impose any 
kind of a gag rule on any 
law enforcement officer 
because I don't have that 
authority nad even If I did 
It would be impractical for 
me to impose any form of 
gag rule," he said. 

Of the alleged meeting 
with VigU. lie said, he 
believed that the story 
grew from an actual 
conversation he had with 
the chief. 

"I think that the 
meeting was only my . 
request to the chief that 
since we now have a * 
designated project 
director in charge that it 
would probably be best to 
have everything relating 
to mutilations funnelled 
through that Investigator. 

"If for no other reason, 
the grant terms • and . 
conditions calls for that 



kind of a concept- 
Martinez said a teletype 
received by every affiliate 
State Police officer of the 
state assigned Richard C 
de Baca as liaison between 
officers and Rommel and 
that "relates to the notion 
that If there Is a mute in 
their responsibility that 
hopefully they will contact 
Rommel." 

Of Rommel's failure to 
appear at the Truchas 
suspected mutilation, he 
said he Is "reasonably 
assured that Ken is 
looking into it" 

•This happened on a 
weekend and Its one of 
those Instances where I 



believe an effort was 
made to contact Rommel 
with no success." 

Of the allegations of a 
cover-up, Martinez said, 
'The only thing I can 
really state I would flatly 
deny basis for supporting 
the contention that there is 
a cover-up # if for no other 
reason than It would put 
the grant in jeopardy." 
. He advised those with 
such contentions to "apply 
to the grantee, the Law 
Enforcement Assistance 
Association." with that 
complaint. The LEAA, he 
contends, would "support", 
the complainant "one 
hundred per cent." 




Mutilations 

Probe Disappointing 

Examination of the tint quarterly report sub- - 
mltted In our famous $50,000 cattle mutilation probe 
would indicate results to date can be described at 
best disappointing. The worst might be to suggest it's 
a waste of the taxpayers* money* , 

In summary, chief investigator Ken Rommel, at 
a salary of $25,000 a year, gave interviews to 
television stations and newspapers, talked with the 
Colorado Bureau of Investigation, confirmed support 
from a numer of state agencies (which he had 
already) and checked out three suspected 
mutilations in his first five weeks on the Job. 

That cost about $2,600 in salary plus unknown 
expenses. 

The report says the investigations Into the three 
cattle deaths (one each in Milaga, Coyote and Tree 
Fiedras) were not complete, although one 
Albuquerque newspaper quoted Rommel as saying 
all three were caused by predators. 

But lo and behold, a mutilation reported tn 
Truchas Saturday morning, only several hours after 
the animal's death and probably the freshest Uv 
cident to date, had yet to be checked out by i p.m. 
Tuesday - more than four days later. Our "Desert 
Fox 1 * hadn't made it to Truchas, the state police 
hadn't responded, the livestock Inspector was not to 
be seen and the only explanation our district at- 
torney (he's the one who got the 150,000 giant) had 
was "itwasaweekend," 

We must advise our cattle mutilators that the 
game is played only five days a week — we rest on 
weekends. 

Now fellows, there is a tremendous amount of 
interest in this subject as evidenced by the turnout 
for the Albuquerque conference conducted by New 
Mexico's Sen. Harrison SchmitL Additional proof is 
the fact that the feds coughed up $50,000 to look into 
it 

While the public can't expect a solution in the 
first six weeks of activity, lor pete's sake they can 
expect more than that skimpy one-page report issued 
last week. And they can expect, for the money they 
are putting out, for someone to show up to in- 
vestigate reported mutilations. 

Byt as one optimist remarked cheerfully: "Look 
at It this way; it's only $50,000. It could have been 
hatf a million." *- 




243 Russell Senate Office Building* Washington, D*C. 20510 Media Contact : Anne Grai 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
July 17 f 1979 

Washington, D*C. B«S. Senator Harrison Schmitt announced today that 

the Senate Appropriation* Committee, on which he serves, Included in the 
Fiscal Tear 198D Justice Department Appropriations Report language directing 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to maintain lte investigation of 
the cattle mutilations that have occurred in northern New Mexico and elsewhere* 

Schmitt said euch action by the Appropriations Committee is "necessary 
due to the continuing widespread problem of cattle mutilations and the need 
for federal coordination of the investigation*" 

H I hope that the Committee'a endorsement of this proposal will increase 
the FBI's investigative activity so that the answer to this bixarre and 
grisly fiystery will be found/ 1 Schmitt added* 

The FBI will investigate the incidents that have occurred and which 
are prosecutable under United States Code 1152 and 1153. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 



ffif.. . \ 12/10/79 - memorandum 



SAC, ALBUQUERQUE (108-541) C 



Mm ITION OF ANIMALS O N INDIAN 

LANDS IN NE W MEXIC O 
CIR (C) " 
to! 00 : ALBUQUERQUE 

DIRECTOR, FBI 



Re Albuquerque letter to the Director, 8/1/79. 

Since being instructed to investigate this matter, 
there have been no reports of mutilations on Indian lands in 
New Mexico. Liaison has been established with appropriate law 
enforcement personnel to insure that mutilations are reported to 
the Albuquerque TBI Office. 

In view of this, no investigation is currently being 
conducted regarding mutilations, and the Albuquerque Office is 
placing this matter in a closed status. 



Q- Bureau (RM) 
1 - Albuquerque 
SWJ : rag 
(3) 




DATE: 



REPLY TO 
ATTN OF; 



1/15/^80 

SA 




( ) • . 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

memorandum 



UQUERQUE (198-541) C 



wMCTi MUTILATION OF ANIMALS ON INDIAN LANDS 

IN NEW MEXICO 
CIR (C) 

toi 00: ALBUQUERQUE 

DIRECTOR, FBI (198-1048) 



I 



Re Albuquerque letter to the Director, 12/10/79. 

Enclosed for the Bureau are five copies of an LHM 
captioned as above. One copy of this LHM is being designated 
for KENNETH M. ROMMEL , District Attorney's Office, Espanola, 
New Mexico. ROMMEL is the Director of a Special Investigative 
Unit set up under an LEAA grant for the purpose of investigating 
animal mutilations. 

No investigation is currently being conducted by the 
Albuquerque FBI Office regarding mutilations, and this case is 
in a closed status. It is again pointed out there have been no 
reports of mutilations on Indian lands in New Mexico since the 
Albuquerque Office wai instructed to investigate this matter. 

\ 

(2)- Bureau (En^feYO 
1 - Albuquerque 
SWJ : rag 
(3) 




Gejrr fid^ 




1^' 



- ' Buy U.S V Savings Bonds Regularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 
January 15 , 1980 



MUTILATION OF ANIMALS 
ON INDIAN LANDS IN 
NE W MEX I CO 

CRIME ON INDIAN RESERVATION 



By communication from FBIHQ dated March G, 1979, the 
FBI, Albuquerque Office was instructed to conduct investigation 
into the mutilations of animals occurring on Indian lands in New 
Mexico ♦ This instruction was based on a memorandum dated March 2, 
1979, from the Department of Justice to FBIHQ , which authorized 
such investigation. 

On April 20, 1979, a conference on livestock mutilations 
was convened in Albuquerque by Senator HARRISON SCHMITT of New 
Mexico, and the U. S. Attorney for New Mexico, R. E. THOMPSON. 
This conference was attended by law enforcement investigators 
from several states, FBI representatives, other interested parties, 
and the press* Approximately 180 persons were in attendance. 
Near the conclusion of the conference, it was reported by the 
District Attorney in Santa Fe, New Mexico, that a Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration (LEAA) grant had been applied for to 
provide funds for a fecial investigative unit to investigate 
cattle mutilations. Subsequently, it was announced that the LEAA 
grant had been made, and that a special investigative unit for 
this purpose had been set up under the auspices of the New Mexico 
State District Attorney in Santa Fe. Former FBI Agent KENNETH il. 
ROMMEL was appointed to head up that unit* 

Investigation by the Albuquerque FBI Office determined 
that there had been reports of dead animals from both the Santa 
Clara Reservation and the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in New 
Mexico. Discussions with GERALD HILL, Bureau of Indian Affairs 
Criminal Investigator, Pojoaque, New Mexico, regarding the dead 
cattle which had been reported on the Santa Clara Reservation by 
members of the Santa Clara Tribe disclosed that these reports 
were in 1978. There was no evidence to cause it to be determined 
that the animals had been mutilated, and Investigator HILL did 
not make a complete investigation of the matter, nor collect any 
evidence for examination. Subsequent discussions with RALEIGH 

This document contains neither recommendations 
nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the property 
of the FBI and is loaned to your agency; it and its 
contents are not to be distributed outside your 



6! o> 



MUTILATION OF ANIMALS ON INDIAN LANDS IN NEW MEXICO 



TAFOYA, Chief of Police, Jicarilla Apache Tribe, disclosed similar 
information, i.e. the reports of unexplained dead animals were 
in 1978, and although they were surrounded by suspicious circum- 
stances, there was no evidence to positively determine that the 
animals had been mutilated. In neither case had evidence been 
preserved for examination, nor were there any complete reports 
of investigation done regarding the deaths. 

The Albuquerque FBI Office has discussed the possibility 
of animal mutilations with law enforcement officers in New Mexico, 
including MEL SEDILLO, JR., Investigator, New Mexico Livestock 
Board, Albuquerque, New Mexico, who has examined numerous animals 
which had been reported as being mutilated. Investigator SEDILLO 
said that in each instance his examination showed that the animals 
had been attacked by predators. 

Since the conference of April 20, 1979, the Albuquerque 
FBI Office has received a voluminous amount of correspondence 

<f «• A 4 mm, 4- « m 4- ^ _ « *• 4> <t ^ w* W .~v Wm«.«% ^.wn mm *4 s4 +■ V* «%4 mm ^kAr\i*4 a» «Arva«i/44 Mff 

i.iuui iiiicicsicu paibxco w n\j uavc cajjuuiiucu tnun vucwiaco ic^aiuiuB 

this subject. Copies of this information have been furnished to 
KENNETH M. ROMMEL for his assistance. 

On January 15, 1980, KENNETH M. ROMMEL advised his office 
has pursued numerous investigative leads regarding the possible 
mutilation of animals in New Mexico. He said that to date, his 
Investigative unit has determined that none of the reported cases 
has involved what appear to be mutilations by other than common 
predators, ROMMEL said he has travelled to other states and con- 
ferred with investigators in those areas regarding mutilations, 
and to date has received no information which would justify the 
belief that any animals have been intentionally mutilated by 
human beings. ROMMEL added that regarding all the dead animals 
he has examined, the damage to the carcasses has always been con- 
sistent with predator action. 

The Albuquerque FBI Office has alerted law enforcement 
officials who have jurisdiction over Indian lands in New Mexico 
concerning the March 6, 1979, authorization for the Albuquerque 
FBI Office to investigate the mutilations of animals on Indian 
lands in New Mexico. These law enforcement officials have 
advised that they would immediately notify the Albuquerque FBI 
Office in the event there are any new occurrences of suspected 
animal mutilations on Indian lands. 

On January 15, 1980, this matter was discussed with 
Assistant U. S. Attorney RICHARD J. SMITH, U. S. Attorney's 
Office, Albuquerque. Assistant U. S. Attorney SMITH said that in 
his opinion there is no Federal interest in continuing an investi- 
gation in this matter in the absence of further reports of acts of 




■u u 

c 

MUTILATION OP ANIMALS ON INDIAN LANDS IN NEW MEXICO 
suspected mutilation of animals on Indian lands in New Mexico. 



€ . V-/#ffice of tye Jisirici (Attorney " } -J 

£fir»i 3fixbfriai district > * 



Mr, 




Kenneth M. Rommel. Jr. G P^°° P » diil » 

«*rv mi m fgyt OfHoe Ion 129 * t 



March 5, 1980 



003070i5 



Director . .^f^-" 



/ 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 
J. Edgar Hoover Building 

Walton, D.C. ^ ^ f; t^ K ^A^^ J$ 

t>ttention: F.B.I. Laboratory ' '"'jpftJ.'Oh, Rps** r (J*Tv'& 790*^ 

Z o C-fentlemen: 
& U- Czl 

5E C?or background information, I refer to your Albuquerque origin matter entitled 

O ^ follows: 
i-iJ <- X 

O0S»f- u Mutilation* of Animals on Indian Lands ±a Sew Mexico — 
Crime on Indian Reservation. 

r_ r^: -Uiclosed for examination is one vial containing several flakes of an unknown 
£T i_ ^terial which this office would like to have identified in connection with an 
O^J^Jficial investigation, : 

For your information* since approximately 1975, New Mexico and other states^ 
primarily those located in close proximity to New Mexico* have had incidents 
referred to by many as "the cattle mutilation phenomena/' Stock animals* primarily 
cattle, have been found dead with various parts of the carcass missing such as one 
eye, one ear* the udder, and normally a cored anus* Most credible sources have 
attributed this damage to normal predator and scavenger activity. However, certain 
segments of the population have attributed the damage to many other causes ranging 
from U.F.O.s to a giant governmental conspiracy, the exact nature of which is never 
fully explained. No factual data has been supplied supTJoyting these theories^/ 

/ A b 7 /y 

In May, 1979* responding to pressure from his constituents * the Jpistrict / 
Attorney, First Judicial District of New Mexico* applied for and waT 
one year L.E.A.A- grant to investigate these mutilations. 

I retired after twenty-eight years as a special agent of the F.B.I, to direct 
this investigation, ^ im 

As previously stated* there are those that have attempted to make a connection 
between cattle mutilations and U.F.O. sitings. 





* 5 9 APR 171980 




o. 



Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 



March 5, 1980 
Page -2- 



In July, 1978, a U.F.O. was reportedly observed by a resident of Taos, New 
Mexico, reportedly hovering over a pickup truck. The next morning, the enclosed 
powder flakes were reportedly recovered from the roof of the aforementioned 
pickup. 

Some of the individuals that are most vocal to the media have Inferred that these 
flakes are identical with a substance that was taken from cowhides in a controlled 
test conducted in the Dulce, New Mexico area. 

Dulce, New Mexico, which has been the site of several reported mutilations, is 
located approximately seventy miles from Taos, New Mexico. I have not been able 
to locate a sample of the substance reportedly collected in the Dulce test, but 
it has been described as a florescent material. 

1 

1 have, to-date, been 1 able to confirm any connection between these two substances, 
and have been told by those that have seen both that they are not identical. 

However, I would appreciate it if through the use of a G.S. Mas spectroscopy test 
or any other logical test, that these flakes can be identified. This in itself 
would go a long way to assisting me to discredit the U.F.O. ~ Cow Mutilation 
association theory. 

If need be, the flakes can be destroyed during your examination. 
Your cooperation in this investigation is appreciated. 



Sincerely, 




KMR/dsm 
enclosure 



<R*v. 4-45-78) 



d 



i 



CO 



REPORT 
of the 



o 



1 - Mr. Aaron 



V 



LAtO MAT OUT 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
WASHINGTON, D. & 20S3S 



Mr. Kenneth H. Rommel, Jr. 
Director V 
Office of the District Attorney 
First Judicial District \ 
Animal Mutilation Project 
_ root Office Box ISM V 
P Kapanola. K*w Mexico MMS 

^mLATIONS OP AH»4AW ON 
INDIAN RESERVATION; TAOS, 
KBW MEXICO, elTLY lift 



April S. MM 
BBQ18TBBBP 



FBI FTLB NO. 
LAB. NO. 
YOUR NO. 



Mt-lMt, 

O0S0TNS 8 MX BI 



Examination »qu««Ud by: 
Kefwanoe: 

EusanttioB nqiwatcd: 

Specimen: 

Ql Flakes of unknown material 

Result of examination « 



LOCK i 3XUB 



Letter dated March », 1M0 
Chemical Anslyscs - Instrumental Analyses 



Specimen Ql was Identified as • white enamel paint typical 
of an acrylic telex/ emulsion -type exterior house paint. The Ql particles 
appear to hare originated from a wood substrate. 

The particular origin and/or manufacturer of this paint cannot 
be determined. The Ql particles are suitable for comparison purposes la 
the erent • suspected source is located. 



Specimen Ql to returned herewith. 




ed with an 



wmiioa baa ba>«o made with the underetandint. that the evidence i* conatot*) with an official 
tavastifaUon of * criminal natter mod that the Laboratory report will be need for official pvnpoea* only, releted 
te> the iovaetifation or a eobeequent criminal proa* cation. Authorisation cannot be panted for tb* nan of the 
^lboratorw report in connection with a civil prooeadioi. iit>I t ^ <r t a. c /\ — S . 



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RECORDED 

3/12/80 

plb* 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

Loborotoiy W*rk Sheet 



AARON 
3/7/80 



Xe . Mr. Kenneth M. Rommel, Jr. 
Director 

Office of the District Attorney 
First Judicial District 
Animal Mutilation Project 
Post Office Box 1209 
Re; Espanola, New Mexico 87531 

MUTILATIONS OF ANIMALS ON 
INDIAN RESERVATION; TAOS, 
NEW MEXICO, JULY 1978 



FBI FILE NO. 1^ gf— /O V — 
LAB. NO. 00307063 S MK ftT 



YOUR NO. 



Examination by: 



Examination requested by; 
Ra fere nee: 

Examination re que ate d: 
Specimen! received: 

Specimen: 

Ql Flakes of unknown material 



Addressee 

Letter dated March 5, 1980 
Chemical Analyses - jwj/AMwWAi. 



TO 5./f?Ad 

M 1 ^ 3/ * r 



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■ npPORDED AARON 
t / FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 3/7/80 ' 

3/12/SQ UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE J. v 

Loboratory Shttl /Jp^^ 

To . Mr. Kenneth M. Rommel, Jr. 
Director 

Office of the District Attorney 

First Judicial District fbi file no. 

Animal Mutilation Project 

Post Office Box 1209 lab. NO. 00307063 S MK r<X 



r* : Espanola, New Mexico 87532 , -7-- rV"*S> " 

i Brt „««*.i W-W!.^-,. " -H.; " 

MUTILATIONS OF ANIMALS ON ^-^^c**^*?. -> 

INDIAN RESERVATION; TAOS, ""*"" | 3.1'--" 

HEW MEXICO,. JULY 1978 " "~ \\ 

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BjuwiBwiar. rp.-jw.Tftd: Cbeinicsl Analyses - inirAw^rtt 4A*t*yfr<b 

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ALBUQUERQUE (198-541) (C) 



MUT X LA.T ION_ OF ANIMALS ON I NDIAN 

"ltANDS_IN_NEWl MEXICO 

CIR (C) — . 

00 : Albuque rque 



O 

j UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

memorandum 



DIRECTOR, FBI (198-1048) 



Re Albuquerque letter to Bureau, 1/15/80. 

Enclosed for the Bureau is one copy of a bound 
report entitled, "OPERATION ANIMAL MUTILATION." This is a 
report of the District Attorney* First Judicial District, 
State of New Mexico, prepared by Kenneth M. Rommel, Jr. 
(former Special Agent}, Project Director, and dated June, 
1980. 

A perusal of this report reflects it adds nothing 
new in regard to potential investigation by the Albuquerque 
FBI of alleged mutilations on Indian lands in New Mexico. 



r 




9 ml ig mo 




- Bureau (Enc. 1) 



if* 



- Albuquerque 
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(3) 




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OPTIONAL FO«M NO 10 

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1*10-112